Proofreader wanted


Has anyone else noticed the erosion of literacy in today's magazines?
Two recent examples:
1. The January Sound&Vision is reviewing a new $8000 integrated from Yamaha.
The first sentence asks: "Are you drooling over those massive UV meters?"
(Don't they mean VU meters?)
2. Another review (can't remember the source) describes some speakers as
"immanently listenable". I think they meant "eminently listenable".
Cowabunga!
Convert?fit=crop&h=128&policy=eyjlehbpcnkioje0otu3nzu4odisimnhbgwiolsicmvhzcisimnvbnzlcnqixx0%3d&rotate=exif&signature=23dd1c06fc5289a6ed927f289325487396b77769ec179d52068b68bf75107822&w=128dweller
As to #1) No, they mean "UV" meters, since the new Yamaha has a response "from DC to (ultraviolet) light"!

As to #2) It must be great to be a reviewer, since apparently you can upload your write up during happy hour!
Perhaps the proofreader was a spellcheck program. "Immanent" is actually a word, as are "imminent" and "eminent" of course. See eminent/imminent/immanent.

Sadly, both errors pale in comparison to the erosion of literacy that is commonly seen these days in emails and internet posts. I suspect that over-reliance on spellcheckers is to blame in some cases, but only in a minority of them.

Regards,
-- Al
You should see the articles that are all over yahoo or msn. I've lost track of how many times I've seen grammatical errors and even spelling errors. Heck I've seen grammatical errors in TV commercials. I don't remember the product but they kept saying funner. Whomever proofread the script sadly didn't do their job IMO.
Don't get me started on the editing failures in the Hartford Courant, our local daily newspaper, which has more misspellings and grammatical errors that you can count on your fingers and toes in each edition. It appears that their money woes are so severe, they have dispensed with editors altogether.
Agreed. As in other measures, grammar in this society has reached an all-time low. No matter the resource level at my (very large and well-respected regional) company, basic acumen in the English language remains more or less nonexistent.

Personally, I find plagiarism (one symptom of the outright dishonesty in this industry as a whole) a far more egregious sin. Multiple episodes on this site, where the general forum had no issue with it, caused my participation and overall faith to plummet to almost nothing.
Whow how terrible.
I must agree. Grammatical and syntactical errors abound in all media and it never fails to confound me that news reporters, whose specific job it is to relate information clearly, cannot construct proper sentences.

However, plagiarism is more serious as it is the theft of ideas and/or product. References or statements with attribution, even a casual one, are too rare.

Spelling errors bother me less and can be amusing.

(Now, that's a grumpy way to start the day.)
Always plagiarize grammatically correct text.
The abysmally low level of discourse on the internet, newspapers, and such can be laid squarely upon the doorstep of the American educational system. Kids are no longer required to diagram sentences, use proper grammar and punctuation, and spell check has made even cursory spelling acuity a thing of the past. Hell, they don't even have to know how to hold pen in hand, keyboards rule the day.

Nowadaze (yes, I know, I'm using it for effect), it's all about how the little darlings feel and letting their souls speak to us. After all, when every kid now gets a trophy for simply showing up to the soccer game, how can one expect them to honor real work and achievement?

And I believe this all got started when every other automobile, SUV, etc. on the road sported a "Baby on board" placard.

The horror, the horror...

-RW-
It has always amazed me that diagramming sentences went by the boards. Oh well, now we have Twitter! How's that for progress? LOL

PS. In my case though I must admit that diagramming sentences went hand in hand with nuns, which was a truly fearsome combination :-)
Here's an actual reply I received right here on Audiogon when I asked a seller to pack a heavy amp with thick heavy foam (not packing peanuts) all around the amplifier:

"Hire those guys pack and ship I can ship this I will trow it in outher box off mcintosh c2300 I buy one shit pink panter starafon and be ok I ship krell kas200s it is much more hevier amp"

I actually Googled the word "starafon" because it threw me, but I couldn't find an appropriate answer. Then I read it to my wife, and she said that the seller probably meant "Styrofoam," and I realized she was right.

Needless to say, I did not pursue the deal any further.
Plato, I could be wrong, but I suspect English is not the first language of the seller in the example you cite. There are lots of people on Audiogon for whom English is not the first language. That's a different issue than the decline and fall of the English language amongst the U.S. populace, which I think is the point of the OP.
Trelja

Personally, I find plagiarism (one symptom of the outright dishonesty in this industry as a whole) a far more egregious sin. Multiple episodes on this site, where the general forum had no issue with it, caused my participation and overall faith to plummet to almost nothing.

I agree on plagiarism and for me, this carries over to design, style and function. I've been tempted dozens to times to start a rant over stolen automobile styling. Certain automobile companies set high standards of style by spending money and putting in hard work, only to have knock off appear in as little as a year.

I think most people are unaware of this or don't care. For some reason it drives me crazy.
I agree with Rlwainwright, it is laid at the feet of our education systems. I hear kids trying to articulate the English language and it is sad as well as revealing. These kids today have little chance if their errors are not corrected. To quote Jaime Escalante (the teacher in Stand and Deliver) "it's not that they are stupid, they just don't know anything". Our education system along with many other areas of public supported agencies lack "acountability", and there begins the path of deterioration. The other "tool" of this demise of grammer, is the shortcuts kids are taught with texting, and as menioned above, keyboards in lieu of pen and paper. But, get used to it, I think this is as good as it will ever be from here forward. We are a dying generation of people that will ever know the difference.
Rlwainwright

I believe this all got started when every other automobile, SUV, etc. on the road sported a "Baby on board" placard.

The horror, the horror...

Replaced by "Baby I'm Bored" placard.

Another one I've not seen in years "Visualize Whirled Peas" always made me smile.
"...this demise of grammer..."

Nice try. :-)
I was going go into rant about where this post is going but it will do NO good.
Ok,just a bitty rant.
Companies have a responsibility to make sure all is correct. But to bring every day people into this is irresponsible and just mean.
School BULLY comes to mind.
I know I spelled Okay wrong,BTW. Sorry BY THE WAY.
Geoffkait
"...this demise of grammer..."

Nice try. :-)

Theo knows something we don’t?

Last I heard they were in the black.
There's a movement afoot to abolish writing because it's no longer necessary. Who needs to write when they can text is the argument. Fabulous!
Whoops! My bad...Grammar...guess I was typing to fast. And yes Albert if you are a stockholder, I hope I didn't spark any undue panic :)
Whoops! My bad...Grammar...guess I was typing to fast. And yes Albert if you are a stockholder, I hope I didn't spark any undue panic :)

Made me smile
I believe the movement or policy that is trying to be passed in US schools is to get rid of cursive writing and put in typing in it's place.

I think another issue with typing on mobile devices is autocorrect IMO. People just rely on it and don't bother to proofread what they typed. One example I saw just now.

Here is a tweet from MMAWeekly

Surgeon Detains Anderson Silva's Surgery, Expects Full Recovery

Obviously they mean details here but I bet whomever put this tweet together was on a phone and just was tapping or swiping away and didn't catch the incorrect word.
On a tangent, there is a book out titled "Albions Seed" that documents the four major folkways brought over from the U.K. One of them, the Borderers, settled west of the colonies since they couldn't get along with the others and have gone on to evolve into one of the mainstays of extreme right wing culture in this country. One of their proud distinctions is the disdain for proper spelling (as seen on their protest placards) and total lack of respect for authority.

From the reviews I've read, it goes a long way towards explaining our cultural roots and differences. It's on my list of what to read soon.

All the best,
Nonoise
Rja: I haven't heard about abolishing writing but I HAVE heard about
not teaching cursive writing.
Maybe we should just print all capital letters?
(upper case and lower case is such a difficult concept!)
I've also heard about abolishing cursive writing and would like to know which group of idiots came up with that idea or whether it's another false meme that grew legs.

Cursive writing (handwriting) is but one of many methods (exercises) which instill an understanding and appreciation of words, their origins, art, text and content, as they all go together to form ideas, thoughts, and imaginings. It's a actual, real time, tie-in to our collective pasts and acts as a foundation to base our communications.

If it is true, some despair is in order.

All the best,
Nonoise
Dat stuff drive me crazy two,dem poeple need moore scoolyn!
On a tangent, there is a book out titled "Albions Seed" that documents the four major folkways brought over from the U.K. One of them, the Borderers, settled west of the colonies since they couldn't get along with the others and have gone on to evolve into one of the mainstays of extreme right wing culture in this country. One of their proud distinctions is the disdain for proper spelling (as seen on their protest placards) and total lack of respect for authority.

All the best,
Nonoise

And all this time I thought it was a lack of education causing the spelling errors. I had no idea it was an additional form of protest. Idiots.
In the Illinois school system, there's a movement afoot to do away with cursive. At the same time doctorate candidates are being taught how to now deal with college age students with poor grammar and writing skills.
Some schools here in Michigan have done away with teaching cursive already. How are these kids going to read anything of importance from our past? History is full of documents, letters, etc., written in cursive. They had a knack for excellent penmanship.
Makes you wonder if a simple "signature" on a contract, check, or just a letter will vanish as a form of validation.
Signatures may indeed become secondary to thumb prints, retinal scans or some other sort of copy. Signatures are already impossible to match with current credit card displays that are common in most stores and try to make out your own signature, let alone try, on a UPS scanner. It's a joke, but it's valid.

All the best,
Nonoise
I think "Generation X" will assume new meaning when they start signing their paychecks.
Happy New Year!
Cool, this is not where I thought this was going.
Don't get excited, but the grammatical errors aren't limited to magazines. Take a look at some of the Audiogon "Forum" postings. I believe that most of the posters here are well-educated but just fail to proofread their responses. I have revisited my own postings and occasionally find that I missed a letter on a word. My degree is in English so I really have no excuse. Reading your posting before hitting "Submit" will correct many of those errors.
Signing paychecks will be a thing of the past. Direct deposit. Beginning now, our pay stubs will not be a hard copy where I work. They will be available online.

I remember working for a former employer about 20 years back where one of the guys couldn't read nor write and needed someone to witness his signing an "X" on his paycheck.