Technics SP10 MK3 Restoration


Just got my SP10 MK3 base (motor unit & controller) back from JP at FidelisAnalog.com
JP is one of the most knowledgeable on the SP10 MK3 and is the one who designed and manufactures the MN6042 Speed Control chip that keeps these and other Technics turntable models still operating.

My SP10 MK3 came with the stock Technics SH-10B5 faux obsidian base.
It has very low hours of use , no signs of wear at all on the bearing and not a single blemish, other than some specs of dust and a couple spots on the copper part of the platter that need cleaning.
but I would like to have a 2 arm, constrained layer plinth built and have the motor unit mounted 'naked'. I am presently searching somewhat 'affordable' plinth builders and suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

The work that JP did to both the motor unit and the controller:

1.       Pre-refurbishment measurement to baseline the performance of the unit and to see if there are any underlying issues.
2. Cleaning of all PCBs to remove the factory conformal coating. At~40 years this coating tends to become hygroscopic which can cause stability issues.
3. Physical inspection of all solder joints under an inspection microscope. Many of the joints will exhibit annular deformities which can lead to joint fractures down the road. These must be cleared of the factory solder and re-soldered. There will also be poor joints that need the same treatment. You can’t just reflow as the solder alloys aren’t the same which can also cause joint failure down the road.
4. Electrolytic cap replacement and rectifier diode replacement.
5. Disassembly and cleaning of the motor. Bearing inspection and service work. Proper Anderol 465 oil is used for reassembly. Motor is then checked for any areas of bearing drag.
6. The brake solenoids typically needs cleaned, and band tension is adjusted.
7. Stop/start and speed selection switches in the motor chassis are measured for contact resistance. Too high of resistance is indicative of a switch failure in the future. In the control unit I typically replace all the tactile switches, and the start/stop switch if needed.
8. Relocation of the brake regulator transistor to the heatsink to prevent overheating of the board (factory design flaw).
9. MN6042 replacement installation.
10. PSU ripple check at all critical stages (10).
11.   Course calibration is performed and post-refurb baseline measurements for FG spectrum, motor drive phases, etc. are taken.

12.   After 48-hour run-in final calibrations and verification measurements are performed.

The basic service returns the unit to factory or better specifications (assuming no permanent bearing damage has occurred).   This service is quite exhaustive and very different from the typical work I see of just swapping some caps out, checking some voltages, and adjusting phase tracking.

The advanced service adds on top of the basic service:

1.       Replace all polyester capacitors.
2. Replace drive circuit metal oxide resistors.
3. Replace all voltage regulator ICs and update circuits.
4. Replacement of certain diodes.

Rick


Ag insider logo xs@2xrich121
I would like to have a 2 arm, constrained layer plinth built and have the motor unit mounted ’naked’. I am presently searching somewhat ’affordable’ plinth builders and suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

What is affordable?
In my opinion the most beautiful plinth for SP10 series is OMA Graphite plinth, but it was about $2k. Check this old thread.

This is very nice OMA plinth (2 arms) for a Technics with removed square chassis.

I’m pretty sure OMA double layer plinth is very expensive, but single layer graphite plinth is super stylish, look at this one and imagine SP10mk3.

Probably you can’t make a graphite or panzerholz plinth cheap, but you can make a plywood plinth very cheap (and veneer it over if you like).

This is my ex SP-10mkII in a custom made Teak Wood Plinth

chakster

I think that OMA only sells the ridiculously expensive caste iron plinth  ~$10K and even if that was 'affordable' I don't think I would want it.

I think the Steve Dobbins slate plinths are up there too in price, plus I have read a few threads where recently people have preferred other materials to slate.

Hoping to find someone who could at least CNC the separate layers of a plinth out of high quality Baltic Birch with a top plate out of Panzerholz and let me finish it.. or better yet... and I could put it together and finish it.... whether or not I can find such is another story  :)

What are you using now for a turntable?
Not very thorough was he.... ;0)

Sounds like a concourse service Rich , perhaps an Albert Porter Panzerholz Plinth Level 2.
The Material Panzerholz is widely discussed.
There is a reasonable amount of Data and descriptions available to be reviewed to show the properties of the material.

The use of it as a Plinth Material is well documented.
The impression it can make as a Plinth Material is subjective and not all reports are going to show it as a preferred choice.

I lean toward Densified Wood as a Plinth Material and have been demonstrated Plinths produced from it used on a few TT's.
I have heard it as a Material in both Lamination configurations.

P'holz is supplied by Delignit, it is available in a few versions of manufacturing processes, where the Laminations are built up from different quantities of tiers per 25mm.
Delignit also offer other Densified Wood Product that have additional tiers per 25mm than P'holz is offered with.
A Densified Wood for a manufacturer is usually to be produced at close to 1400Kg per Cubic Metre. 
   
I use a Partially Densified Wood on a Direct Drive TT and have a Densified Wood Material available to produce a New Plinth for when the next Trials are due to commence. 

I feel confident your interest in Densified Woods will be quite valuable.     
I think that OMA only sells the ridiculously expensive caste iron plinth ~$10K and even if that was ’affordable’ I don’t think I would want it.


Not only, the Graphite plinth was their previous model, it was about $2k when I asked. You can always ask them using this link. But anyway, it’s inspiration at least (for design). They are expensive, but this one for example is not simple design, it’s two layers of Pennsylvanian Graphite .

What are you using now for a turntable?

I sold my Technics turntable about 3 years ago, but on the image you see a $500-700 teak wood plinth. Last year I put together a system for a friend, custom made Baltic birch plywood plinth was made locally for under $200 for his Technics.

What am I using now? I have much better turntables for my needs (I designed custom made racks for each of them), I happy that a question about plinth does not exist for me anymore (my Luxman PD-444 comes in super heavy aluminum stock plinth on suspended feet, each aluminum armboard is adjustable for a given PS distance and can be used for almost any tonearm on the market).


You may want to check with Chris at Woodsong. I know they made SP-10 plinths, but I don't know if they are still doing that as I did not see any on their website.

I have a Woodsong plinth on my Garrard 301.

https://www.woodsongaudio.com/contact
My advice is don’t overthink it. Nearly all the materials discussed can yield excellent results. I do rate constrained layer damping as a plus, and the mk3 needs high mass, IMO. I used slate and cherrywood. My plinth weighs about 90 lbs I think. ( I never weighed the assembled unit.) My slate comes from the same quarry used by OMA.
Don't see what's so great about the Oma plinth besides the atrocious price.  My vote would go for Albert Porter's panzerholz plinth capable of two arms.
Presumably, you are referring to the cast iron plinth offered by OMA. Just to be sure there is no confusion, I was referring to the slate plinth that has been offered by OMA for many years. I personally would have misgivings about mounting an SP 10 Mk3 in a cast iron plinth, because of the massive magnet that is the rotor.  It would take some convincing for me to believe there is no deleterious interaction between the iron plinth and the rotor that might affect torque, for example. On the other hand, this is such an obvious issue that I have to believe OMA did their homework a priori.
Porter’s plinth is the ugliest box ever (imo), even if technically it’s great (here is the article), I believe they are NOT available commercially and they are very expensive too. Artisan fidelity plinth for Technics is also “just a box” (even if the wood is nice). The ugliest thing on all those plinths is the armboard, I must say I don’t like the armboard on cast iron plinth too. And this is the worst plinth I ever seen in my life.

When it’s expensive it must be beautiful at least! OMA Graphite plinth are beautiful and designed by professional designer with a good taste! The armboards are beautiful (round shape), especially the version with technics drive mounted without square chassis, in my opinion the armboards must be made from the same material as the rest on the plinth and everything must look like one piece. What is the ugliest on the stock Obsidian Technics plinths is the armboard frame and cherry wood in this frame. All the plinths that just imitate the original obsidian design are terrible in my opinion. What is the reason to hide Technics drive lower in the plinth if it can be just on top of the plinth just like this (sp20) or like this (sp10mk2).

All commercially available plinths are extremely expensive from $2k up to $10k (just for the plinth alone).

A custom made plywood plinth should not cost more than $300 in my opinion, veneer with exotic wood is optional, some top quality lacquer is also optional. It can be automotive paint also. Basically a plinth is just a plinth, I would never pay more than $700 for whatever plinth.

This is not Technics, but the plinth design is super stylish (look here) in my opinion and it’s Graphite.

When Technics square chassis is removed this shape of the plinth with round armboards is nice in my opinion.

For looks alone, the Dobbins plinth is gorgeous. It looks like slate (which Chakster likes to call "graphite") but I think it is made from a synthetic material that has some of the properties of slate/graphite.  For what it's worth, Rich, and I think I have mentioned this before, by ordering my slate slab direct from the quarry, where they honed both sides to perfect flatness and even champhered the corners so as to give it a nice look, and then having it cut to fit the Mk3 by a water-jet company also in PA, I was able to make my slate plinth for about a total of less than $600.  Then I had the solid cherry base made by a carpenter for another few hundred bucks.  I bolted the slate and the wood together for max CLD effect, but gravity really does most of that work. I can help if you want to go a similar route.
I dont like plywood or panzerholz because they are dimensionally unstable in the long term - warping, expansion, contraction.

I have had excellent results with Engineered Stone ( 95% plus quartz for premium quality european product ). There are many kitchen benchtop manufacturers with the requisite CNC machines to ensure accuracy at modest prices, particularly if you use offcuts which most have from large jobs.

I have also used Ebonised Bamboo ply, this is a high density bamboo ply ( over 50% heavier than standard bamboo ply ) - it is 50% harder than maple. In this case I did the CAD drawings myself, and used a CNC contract cutter to do the cutting. You need very sharp quality router tips or blades to cut this stuff cleanly.

Both of these are relatively modest in price if you do the construction yourself after outsourcing the cut materials.





" I have much better turntables for my needs (I designed custom made racks for each of them), I happy that a question about plinth does not exist for me anymore (my Luxman PD-444 comes in super heavy aluminum stock plinth"

@chakster 

The Luxman PD 444 do NOT have a heavy aluminum stock plinth.
The weight is two thick steel plates
sandwiched over a piece of bloody particle board,  then epoxy glued to a thin sheet of brushed Aluminum for dress. Most of that 50 plus pounds is the steel.

Besides didn't you say forget the table it doesn't matter its only the cart to worry about? Yet here you are with more bloated bragadocios nonsense and incomplete incorrect statements paraded as fact..... I owned one 40 plus years ago and even I can remember its make up ....
I think the Individual in the Link knows a thing or three about P'holz.
Worth a read on what is referred to as Tank Wood (which their used term for P'holz)

Mono & Stereo © 2021: Interview with Rainer Weber of Kaiser Acoustics
@chakster 
Your posts above 07-24/25-2021 would have to be some of your most ill informed posts ever, even by your own modest standards.
Artisan fidelity plinth for Technics is also “just a box” (even if the wood is nice). 

No its not. the Artisan Fidelity plinth is a sophisticated constrained layer plinth using panzerholz and other materials and includes a drain block for the main bearing.
OMA Graphite plinth are beautiful and designed by professional designer with a good taste! 

No - the plinth in the picture is a slate plinth, not graphite.
Not sure if you are aware but one is a metamorphic rock with structured layers, the other is a mineral, a form of crystalline carbon quite soft.
The properties of each material are quite different.
Basically a plinth is just a plinth, 
No. The plinth construction and materials used can materially affect the overall sound of a turntable motor. I do understand that you might struggle to hear any difference with your knackered old 80's MM's that you think are state of the art.
Luxman PD-444 comes in super heavy aluminum stock plinth 
No, its a weetbix sandwich that uses magnetic steel plates, wrapped in thin alumium foil.

You seem to listen with your eyes, not your ears, and prognosticate at length on items you have clearly never heard and have little or no understanding of, as evidenced by the posts above.

 

No its not. the Artisan Fidelity plinth is a sophisticated constrained layer plinth using panzerholz and other materials and includes a drain block for the main bearing.

As always you have nothing to add @dover, and you always arguing about something that everyone know without your remarks. Links posted in all my replies in this thread.

When I said "just the box" I mean the design (the way it look), construction layers pictured in the article I posted earlier in this thread and everyone can see different layers.

No doubt the $10k plinth should work effectively, but it must look good too for this price at least. That was the argument and I explained why.

If you like boxes like this then I doubt you have a good taste. This is another bad example with those ugly baths around the tonearms and the drive pushed down into the plinth. OMA solution is so much better with the armboards on the corners. Their Garrard plinth is so much better (in terms of design) because they do not try to push the Garrard down into the plinth and do not make those bath around the tonearm, you know what I mean? OMA did the same with Garrard plinth and Technics plinth. The argument for a perfect look is to leave the Technics drive on top of the plinth (not trying to push it down) with the arm fixed on the same level (on top of the plinth).They did it, but ONLY after the metal chassis around the platter was completely removed, this is perfect. And OMA designed similar plinth for Technics.

I am not gonna discuss the "sound of the plinth" or the "sound of the drive" with anyone on this forum, this is the most boring discussion. I am happy to discuss design, because some of the most expensive high-end products on the market is almost always the ugliest in terms of design.

its a weetbix sandwich that uses magnetic steel plates, wrapped in thin alumium foil.


The "aluminum plinth" on Luxman PD-444 is not thin and not foil (!), the thickness of aluminum all over the cabinet around the sandwich is nearly 5mm, to see it you have to remove the sideboards, but nearly the same thickness of aluminum used for LUX amps and you can look at this "aluminum foil" (as you call it). The aluminum plinth is not supposed to be a whole piece of aluminum to weight a ton that impossible to ship. However, the Luxman chassis is metal and "armboards" are metal, and slide for armboard is metal, anyway this is not the subject of this post! The OP asked what I use and this is the only reason I mentioned Luxman, because I SOLD TECHNICS more than 3 years ago! You don’t own Luxman turntable and you don’t like Technics or any direct drive, so why you are in this thread ?


No - the plinth in the picture is a slate plinth, not graphite.

Did you ever check the links I posted to OMA site where you can read SLATE PLINTH!? So what you’re arguing about? Everyone can read it’s a slate plinth. BUT "Graphite" (look on this plinth) in my terminology is the color, same as OMA Graphite Mat and Graphite headshell. (it’s not just grey as you can see).

From my conversation with Jonathan (OMA) gerarding "graphite plinth":

"Double layer slate plinths are $3500, custom designed for whatever arm(s) you want to use. Single layer are $2750. Two arm plinths add $750 to either version."

The plinth construction and materials used can materially affect the overall sound of a turntable motor.


If you like ugly looking overprised plinths you can discuss their "perfect sound" with your audiophile friends.

I would rather go to buy more records to spin on my pair of Luxman PD-444 without thinking I have to change the plinth.

Regarding a plinth for SP-10 series I believe a custom made $300 baltic birch plywood plinth is enought. I want to admit that stock plinth for Denon DP-80 or Victor TT-101 are more than enought too, they goes for $300 and can be restored (waxed or veneered) by any pro carpenter.

I do understand that you might struggle to hear any difference with your knackered old 80’s MM’s that you think are state of the art.

I do understand that at your age you might not hear what I hear at all. This is far more important problem than a choice of cartridges. In fact one of my turntable with FR-66fx and FR64s tonearms are for LOMC only.

As a typical retired ex high-end dealer you can continue to brainwash your non existing customers in your dreams that to hear something good they must spend $10k for a plinth and another $10k for a LOMC cartridge. I’ve heard it before. And you are absolutely right that I refused to buy even $2000 plinth for my ex Technics, instead I bought two different PD-444 turntables with built-in plinth and I’m happy. My teak plinth was quite nice to hear everything I want to hear from my analog rig and genuine obsidian plinth wasn’t any better. Technics can be used without plinth on AT616.

You can continue to post your absurd about vintage MM cartridges, but I’ll tell you that when SP-10mkII was in my system my cartridge was this ZYX Premium 4D SB2 (it’s $5k modern LOMC) and Airy 3 with silver coil (another $3k LOMC). At the same time in MM arsenal these two beauties with EPA-100. Am I missed something?


I would not waste much money for such a box, whatever material. Why not using a vibration platform with it, Herzan or similar. Makes more sense
@chakster 
If you like boxes like this then I doubt you have a good taste.
If you read my post correctly above, I have already said that I dont like panzerholz, timber, plywood etc because it is not dimensionally stable.
If you like boxes like this then I doubt you have a good taste. 
As Salvador Dali said - "It is good taste, and good taste alone, that possesses the power to sterilize and is always the first handicap to any creative functioning"
 If you actually read my post above I make my own plinths using either ebonised bamboo or engineered stone - nothing like the Woodsong/Artisan Fidelity plinths. 

You can continue to post your absurd about vintage MM cartridges, but I’ll tell you that when SP-10mkII was in my system my cartridge was this ZYX Premium 4D SB2 (it’s $5k modern LOMC) and Airy 3 with silver coil (another $3k LOMC). At the same time in MM arsenal these two beauties with EPA-100. Am I missed something? 
Yes, a decent turntable.

Was out for the weekend.

Everyone, thanks for all the informative posts... so much to read here, again thank you!
@lewm
I very much appreciate your offer. 
Have drooled over your plinths pics many times.
Will try getting something built and if I am unable and you still would like to help me I will definitely take you up on that offer  :)
@noromance
Thank you for the suggestion.
I went to his website and sent an email but I got it back saying undeliverable...
I then filled out the form letter on his webpage hopefully that goes thru and he is still in business.
@syntax
@chakster

Always love your posts and suggestions.
I am going to try to keep the plinth as simple and inexpensive as possible.
@jperry
Thank you for the suggestion and the shop is actually not that far from where I live in Washington State.

I filled out the web page information form and hopefully hear back from Mr. Harban.
As Salvador Dali said - "It is good taste, and good taste alone, that possesses the power to sterilize and is always the first handicap to any creative functioning" If you actually read my post above I make my own plinths using either ebonised bamboo or engineered stone - nothing like the Woodsong/Artisan Fidelity plinths.


Would be nice to see a picture of your plinth then @dover

I asked:


When SP-10mkII was in my system my cartridge was this ZYX Premium 4D SB2 (it’s $5k modern LOMC) and Airy 3 with silver coil (another $3k LOMC). At the same time in MM arsenal these two beauties with EPA-100. Am I missed something?


You said:

Yes, a decent turntable.

I want to remind you that this is a TECHNICS thread, the OP is happy with fully restore MK3, but you think we’re all missed a decent turntable, you know better as always.

You forgot to tell what is a decent turntable if the Technics SP10mkII or MKIII are not good enough ?
Quote
" I dont like plywood or panzerholz because they are dimensionally unstable in the long term - warping, expansion, contraction"
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Thats kind of both true and false in my experience. For large objects like a plinth and platforms it false. For smaller objects it is somewhat true like in a tonearm. I have large pieces I have been using that I got from work when the plant was moving.
Came from machinery delivered and made in the60’s from Germany as skid and protection plates . After the machines so large they were floated on air in place the plates were removed and sat in a cold basement in winter and hot and humid in summer since 1962. I got them in 2003.
No checks cracks or warping and straight as could be. Apparently on smaller items like tonearms n such  the fibre structure is compromised.
This is copied from morningside....

"With standard products, like Panzerholz, much thicker laminations mean there is less stability when using the product on a very small-scale. When you release the confining tension of various layers, above and below, natural wood fibers will start to relax somewhat. *This is not a problem with large objects, like plinths, or bullet proof doors, * "
........................................
I’ve used it in numerous plinth builds , seen it used for engineered self supporting stairs in high end loft conversions etc.
Structurally its a very sound material. Ive not experienced the stability or cracking and warping at all that you’ve seen.
The pieces I had and have were 5 ft by 1.5 ft by 35mm thick . So much resin , not sure it really could be called birch wood anymore. Its a real blade and bit killer when cut to low or too high an rpm.

Apparently Pica wood is much better for smaller objects as its thinner cross lamination is specifically in a way to maintain its strength over a much smaller dimension. I’ve not used it so I can’t say from experience . Panzerholtz was my choice because I have never felt Aluminum was a good choice other than its ease of machining and once cheap price and after reading the specific tests done I pushed forward with what I had. I’ve seen other and heard other’s choices too. Its a matter of your design and materials at hand and what you like n want personally.. Lots of good results. I’m curious about the ebonized bamboo ply you mentioned as it sounds like another viable option to look into.
Choice is a good thing.

Although looks are very subjective, few could argue the skill, time, effort and cost of machinery and materials some of these plinth’s take to design and
build as well as business costs. Let alone the results. a "300 dollar plinth"... thats basically a board with a hole in it. Cheers

https://www.lessloss.com/page.html?id=80


Russ at Layers Of Beauty is excellent and priced better than most. I built a 2 arm panzerholz plinth with the drain etc for my SP10 MK3 (also dialed by JP) and when I needed advice Russ was a truly great guy and helped me. The panzer cost me about 1k all in, about $50 for some maple veneer, and the rest is all elbow grease, lots of it.

Cusworth plinths can also be made to order, all hand planed, can be as simple or novelty as you like, albeit more popular for older idlers. Check Audio Grail for examples.

Personally I would never give any money to OMA. All ego and hype, and that stuff looks steampunk. Maybe it’s not “just a wood box” but cmon, it’s just as ugly; weird corners, weird edge lip, hideous large logo, looks like a piece of shrapnel.

If you want not expensive and not wood, snd have some patience searching, you can find an old Lead Console by Osaka Canle Co, here’s one (you can find w/ 2 arms) https://youtu.be/oagZKxwmC8E

Or there is this: https://www.instagram.com/p/CG-40OXpE_-/?utm_medium=copy_link
@au_lait
Thank you for the suggestions. Very good to know.

As for Jonathan @ OMA, he lost all respect from me and many others in his first years of business.
On many occasions he insulted and otherwise turned away many people/friends in the hobby due to his arrogance and just plain rudeness, some who actually have posted on this thread.
He will not get my business.


It’s all a matter of taste after all. Someone may like the old lead console made in Japan in the 70’s, but It’s just another very simple metal frame. Back in the 70’s/80’s this company made lead consoles for Sony, Technic, Denon and others. I think it’s nothing special and custom made plywood plinth could be better.

Regarding OMA, again, Most people look at this company as “something beautiful” regardless of price as very few people can afford OMA products. But their plinth priced just like any other premium plinth from well known manufacturers.

Reading a negative posts about OMA I must admit that I have personal experience dealing with them about 5 years ago and my experience is very positive! He’s a dealer or Schroder, Ortofon, Miyajima, Schick, SoundSmith ... I bought my Schick “12 inch tonearm and Ortofon SPU cartridge from OMA for my Technics SP10mk2. Jonathan personally replied to all my email and answered all my questions, it was very helpful. In fact his price eas cheaper than German price for Schick tonearm so it was a very good deal. It was excellent service, no rudeness at all (I have no idea what you talking about @rich121 ), I asked so many questions and got all the answers, Jonathan was very helpful, I even tried to buy his demo Miyajima carts few years later and we tried to negotiate about the price, everything was nice and smooth like it should be. Compared to many other well known dealers I tried to communicate by email at that time asking questions, Jonathan was the best! This my experience with OMA, I had to say that, let’s be truthful.

I can imagine that some people may not like what he think about Direct Drive turntables (his preference is clearly DD and this preference is not popelar in high-end community). Regarding his own products it’s easy to watch his videos where he claimed they are not a typical high end company. So do not expect them to sell you what you can find in a typical high-end store.

Their demo loft is beautiful and some of his speakers, stands, plinths, amps are beautiful and made with a great passion! He’s got a well educated designer or design team that other high-end companies can only dream about.


His stuff is art, it’s nice to have an independent company like OMA today. He’s doing a geat job explaining people on his youtube channel a lot of things about history of audio (horns, tube gear, turntables). He’s doing it not for audiophiles, but for younger people. His showroom in NYC is open and anyone can come, you don’t have to buy! This is great.

@chakster

Of course he was nice to you... you were handing over $$$ and he wanted more of your $$$!

Conversations and interactions that I was referring to were non-business... they were interactions between 'hobbyists'

Enough already... not going to go there.





@chakster

Of course he was nice to you... you were handing over $$$ and he wanted more of your $$$!


No, he never tried to push anything, he did not even tried to sell me slightly more expensive cartridge (but he could). He was a honest dealer, this is what I like. And believe me I ask question BEFORE I buy anything, not after! Other well know dealers in USA simply ignored my questions if there are more than one question or more than one email.

Conversations and interactions that I was referring to were non-business... they were interactions between ’hobbyists’


Conversation with YOU personally or someone else ? If you don’t have personal experience with OMA you’d better not comment. Some hobbyists here on audiogon are very rude, but it’s a free speech, not their job, everyone can be in a bad mood and everyone has an opinion.

I’m sure there is nothing wrong with the reputation of OMA as a company, they got their customers and they got their unique product to offer on the market. Let’s be honest!


P.S. I remember companies like B&O, today rich people are buying them because of unique design for their interior. Unique design cost money. OMA is not B&O, so I believe it's a combination of sound and vintage oriented design. But I never heard their speakers in real life, I know people who tried them in NY showroom.  
As for Jonathan @ OMA, he lost all respect from me and …
He will not get my business.

Good, seems you have more brain than others …
Is a Technics SP10-MK III in an appropriate plinth well restored better than a Woodsong Garrard 301?
I guess the question is DD or Idler drive?
I enjoy the physicality, drive and PRAT of the 301.
Is a Technics SP10-MK III in an appropriate plinth well restored better than a Woodsong Garrard 301?
Better or worse, nah it’s subjective of course, they’re just different. 
@chakster Yeah that’s the lead console pic I was looking for, the 2 arm. Not any “better” than the obsidian really, just an aesthetic. I’d take that over OMA any day, even tho it was more commonplace and not TOTL.
@chakster

My experience with Jonathan was personal... it was interactions and discussions with him/others as hobbyists... before those discussions, when he and I discussed his plinths, he was quite the different person.

I didn't want this to get negative... as I try to stay positive and enjoy this great hobby.
@syntax 

" I would not waste much money for such a box, whatever material. Why not using a vibration platform with it, Herzan or similar. Makes more sense"

I'm watching for a good vibraplane like you use :)
This is a good chuckle.


@au_lait

Do you know who is the author?


Because if you ever read this Romy The Cat blog you can see the attitude of this Russian guy a bit better. For example, you can simply read his opinion on Denon 103 and I’m sure so many audiophiles will be offended :) There are more in his blog.

What I don’t really understand is why someone criticize other people Sound System in public after a personal visit, he even posted something about Jonathan’s wife and classical music, but not everyone is into classical music in 21st century! He posted a picture of the vintage horns from the actual Oswald Mil house in Pennsylvania, not the OMA hons from his NYC showroom!

As I said let’s be honest. Jonathan clearly explained in this video that he filled up his house with vintage tube electronics, horns, turntables and all that stuff for his own delights! He’s a collector of vintage analog gear first and then a founder of his own company. But I believe his real passion is vintage analog gear. He’s also a film maker.

He explained his background on OMA site, it’s an interesting story and many images of the manufacturing process of OMA equipment etc. Actually, far more interesting than reading a blog of that audiophile Romy The Cat who can’t even hire a web designer to make his posts readable and his blog navigation more user friendly, but Romy The Cat, who listen to classical music, criticize people who design beautiful things and running the biggest showroom open for public in NYC (everyone can visit).

As usual this thread kinda veered off topic. OP wants a plinth. It sounded at first like OP wants to remove the outer chassis and just use the motor? Iirc...

There was a guy in Japan that did this using a light weight balsa like wood. Anyone remember his name? It just goes to show how many ways to slice the 'plinth-pie' :). Heavy, light, stone, wood, metal, mix...

I wonder how a stack of that carbon fiber balsa-cored paneling would do? Very stiff and light so resonant freq on the higher end I would imagine...could alternate direction of carbon and wood grain.



solypsa, There are many aftermarket plinth makers who can remove an SP10 Mk2 or Mk3 motor assembly from its square-ish surrounding escutheon and mount only the motor assembly in a plinth specially designed for that purpose.  I think OMA can do that.  I know that Steve Dobbins was among the first to do that.  Probably others can do that too, for a price.  The process requires re-locating the on/off switch and the speed selector switch to some other outboard location, so it is not for the amateur. 


As to balsa wood, I am a firm believer that the very high torque motors of the SP10 MK2 and especially the Mk3 are best off in a high mass plinth.  Otherwise, there is the possibility for the tail to wag the dog; the very high torque puts a rotational force not only on the platter but also on the motor assembly.  Nature does not care which of the two rotates.  You want the torque to be used to push the platter, only.  So the plinth should be high in mass to resist motion.  Balsa wood need not apply. This is my opinion.  Others may disagree.  That's OK with me.
The process requires re-locating the on/off switch and the speed selector switch to some other outboard location, so it is not for the amateur.
 

I remember Technics remote control with same on/off button for mkII version
@lewm

Only the motor unit with cable needs to be mounted to the plinth, as none of the controls on the original face plate are needed/used... all control will be from the remote control.
I don’t think it to be any more difficult... just will need an additional layer of material to surround the platter as a top plate.

Also totally agree with the plinth needing mass, either slate or constrained layer panzerholtz/baltic birch or maybe even Delignit/Panzerholtz and baltic birch?


@chakster
I’m sure you can find similar threads on most other audio forums... I know from experience they are on AudioAsylum.
@solypsa

This is for a SP10 MK3 motor unit, not the MK2.

The MK3 is fairly easy to mount nude.

Rick
The common reference to the stripped back Motor where the Plinth takes on the role of the the Chassis is a Kaneta Design.
I believe there are variants of this method in use to date, and the reports from users I have discussed this method with are made giving a very positive appraisal.
Myself and a friend are going down this road as an experiment, along with trialling New Platter Designs as well.

This is where Polybentonite Resin Plinths come into their own.
When a Densified Wood is not an option, the resin material has Performance Measurements that are almost on parity with a Densified Wood and will also be a version of a massy plinth, such as a Natural Stone. 
@chakster 
Here is an old Japanese TOHO cast iron base for Technics

Ooooh that's quite interesting! Similar to the Micro plinth that was made in super low numbers, in a way? Kinda hardcore, but I respect the vision!
Yes, those old Japanese Toho cast iron plinths are an eye candy, they also made their own tonearm btw.

So the cast iron has been used since the ’70s for Technics plinth, it was 59.5 lbs (27kg). The price for TM-10 for Technics was 230 000 YEN as stated in the catalog.