Replacing Veneer on ProAc Speakers


Movers seriously gouged the veneer on the top of one of my rosewood ProAc Response 1S speakers. I think it's too deep to refinish. Any recommendations for someone who does speaker restoration? It makes me ill to look at those wonderful speakers in that condition.
jclctr
I'd look for a professional antique/furniture restorer or cabinet maker. Where are you located?
They're not your speakers any more, the mover now owns them. I'm sure that the brand new pair they get you won't have anything wrong with them.
I would agree with Zd542. I would not even try to repair them , but have the moving company pay for the cost of a new pair.
Take a picture of the gouge, use good lighting and a camera with decent close focus (macro) ability and post it online somewhere. I can tell you if it's repairable or not.

As long as the gouge isn't through the veneer, it can be fixed, thought not a simple job. The speakers would have to be stripped to bare cabinets, the gouged panel sanded until the gouge is gone and all other panels sanded to remove old finish, and then new finish sprayed. And to get a grain filled finish usually requires a total of 10-20 coats approx. depending on veneer species. And honestly you'd want to do both speakers or else the finish wouldn't match exactly.

Anybody is going to charge at least $500 to do all that, unless you have a buddy who knows what he's doing :)
If you could find someone to do that for $500 I'd consider you one VERY lucky man. Sounds more like $1,000 worth of work at least. However, I agree with ZD542 and others, the movers now own those speakers and you get the joy of picking out brand new ones...

-RW-
Sounds more like $1,000 worth of work at least.
RW, I believe that no need to go medical or law school, because you can learn how to refinish speaker much faster and charge $250/hourly if not more. Consider that skill for your childrens' future.
i'd be curious to see a picture of the damage, if the op can post. depending on the depth of the gouge, veneer color, etc., it might be possible to get good results with stainable wood filler or conceivably refacing the top with psa veneer--there's some very good veneer products out there.
I'll see if I can summon the guts to pull them out of the box. It makes me ill to see such a wonderful product in that condition.
Some furniture repair persons are true artisans. I would not discount their ability to fix or mask the problem.

The moving company has the option to replace the item or fix the damage, whichever is more economical. Read your contract, it should be clearly spelt out.
Thinking a moving company is going to replace them is what delusional people do. No way. I've had the unpleasant experience of dealing with moving adjusters and there is no way you are going to come out 'whole', especially since the speakers in rosewood are not in production. What to do? Cry, then take the moving company to small claims court for $1500 plus court and legal expenses. Move on to a new pair of ProAc's, which are great speakers. I own the one's you have lost.
I hesitated to post on this, because I have suffered damage to furniture and wall art from movers earlier on before I knew better, and I know how you must feel. The lesson I learned is that if you value the item, and it is fragile, move it to the new location in your own car. Movers have little respect for anything but saved time. Those speakers could easily have been put into your car. That said, I don't know what your moving situation was, so it may not apply.
Regarding the refinishing, I would check with a restorer. They can perform some miracles at times without refinishing the whole piece.
"03-24-15: Jclctr
I'll see if I can summon the guts to pull them out of the box. It makes me ill to see such a wonderful product in that condition."

Don't feel too bad, you're new ones won't be scratched. Also, if for some reason you can't get the mover to make good on them, you should be able to file a claim with your homeowners/renters policy.
given the correct fact by buconero, you still can initiate a claim against moving company, collect funds, sell your speakers + collected funds will probably get you a new pair or near-mint used pair of proacs.
Most home insurance policies don't cover damage as a result of moving.
"03-24-15: Buconero117
Thinking a moving company is going to replace them is what delusional people do. No way. I've had the unpleasant experience of dealing with moving adjusters and there is no way you are going to come out 'whole', especially since the speakers in rosewood are not in production. What to do? Cry, then take the moving company to small claims for $1500 plus court and legal expenses. Move on to a new pair of ProAc's, which are great speakers. I own the one's you have lost."

Unfortunately, you're probably right. The only thing I don't agree with is the $1500. Ask for $5000 (or whatever your local maximum is), plus all court costs in addition to the 5k. You can always settle for less, but you can't go up.

"03-24-15: Brf
Most home insurance policies don't cover damage as a result of moving."

I understand why you would say that, but in most cases (including this one), that's probably not true. Most home owners and renters policies will cover this type of loss. The problem is getting them to pay it. Most of the time the insurance company will try and talk their way out of paying legit claims. Or, at the very least, try to settle for a lessor amount.
Buconero is right in my experience. You can try to get restitution from them, or take it to court which won't be worth it. Find a good restorer and save the aggravation. You may be surprised at what can be done for a reasonable price
I think Roxy54's advice is right on target. I got into a legal battle w a mover, who presented me with a bill that was 3X the estimate. Yes, triple. When I balked, they drove off w all of my worldly goods. It cost me $1K in legal fees to get my stuff back; I still had to pay the bastards 110% of the estimate, AND of course they demanded a release on any damage. And I got lucky, because the estimate was on an interstate form that had a stipulation for resolution of billing disputes. I'm sure that there are lots of reputable movers and lots of people who try to stick movers for pre-existing damage.

But, sometimes you gotta suck it up and write it off! Now that doesn't mean you shouldn't present the mover with a repair estimate. They will counter by saying that they will have their guy do the job. He will come out and rub a little almond stick (or even half of a walnut) and/or some dye with a Q-tip, show it to you in some dim interior light, and say "TA DA!!! All better!!!. Then you will have to wait a day or 2 for the almond stick to dry out, put it in some good light and take a picture and tell the mover, nice try. He will probably say "Sue me!. Then you have to decide if it is worth it. If you think you might go down that road, you will need to document everything in writing with pictures. Send registered letters, not email. Most likely you will end up in small claims court. The best you will do, most likely, is get the repair cost. There's a good chance the mover will not even show up. So you win a default judgment. In most/maybe all states, you will have to hire a constable or process server or sheriff to serve the judgment papers. Then when they don't pay, you will need to try to find out where they bank, identify the proper corporate entity, and ask the court to order the bank to pay you. Then you'll probably need to get another process server to get that to the bank. Fees all along the way. $25 here, $100 there. Lots of lost time and aggravation. Unless they are totally destroyed, Roxy54 has probably nailed it.
There are consumer laws in the USA but they are VERY seldom enforced.
In essence, a joke.
@Jclctr- When you figure out your course of action(if it includes having your ProAcs re-veneered/refinished), let me know. I've got decades of experience with veneers and speaker cabinets. Obtaining Rosewood veneer(Santos/Brazilian/East Indian/etc) is no problem.
I'd certainly file a damage claim with the mover; can't hurt.

Contra some of the experiences noted above, when I did so for some broken furniture, I received a reasonable and timely settlement for repairs (which I ended up doing myself).

If all your equipment must be an AG 10, a furniture repair person might not cut it. But it may well be that a good one could effect a cosmetically acceptable result with a process less involved than Ryan describes, and do so within the dollar constraints of a settlement -- which I agree is unlikely to be the pair's replacement cost , for a sonically functioning single speaker with a scratch.

Still, sorry for your loss! :(

John
I agree that filing a damage claim is the right way to start; I just think the OP has to be realistic about what the end game is. If the speakers were broken, like Jdoris' furniture, that would be a very different matter. Cosmetic damage to a single speaker that remains fully functional and which is no longer in production is unlikely to get a sympathetic response from an insurance adjuster. They will depreciate the speaker and most likely offer a small fraction of the depreciated value, as long as the speaker still works. If you go into this assuming that they owe you a new pair of equivalent speakers, you're very likely to suffer through a long, frustrating, high blood pressure inducing process that will not get you where you want to be. It's a matter of having realistic expectations. If the mover or their insurer steps up to the plate, great. But don't count on it. Just my opinion. YMMV.