Any Sota Sapphire experts out there?

I've recently purchased a used Sota Sapphire series 3 on which I installed an SME series V arm. I have to say, this 'table almost blows my VPI Scoutmaster with many improvements (including 10.5 arm and periphery ring) out of the water. Deep, tight, effortless bass. Tracks anything. Extremely musical.
However, I can't seem to find any basic maintenance information for the table. Specifically, spindle bearing lubrication, what kind, and how. And motor bearing lubrication, same, what kind and how? I need some tips on these assemblies; how do I disassemble to access for cleaning, oiling, etc?
Surely, some of you Audiogoners can lead me in the right direction... (The Sota folks are nice, but seem that they would much rather me send them the table for inspection and upgrades; I just want to know how to maintain the gear I own.)
I owned 3 different SOTA tables and they do not need any lubrication. the weak link is the springs the table hangs on them and can be stretched if you are using the clamp screw the feet as close to the base as possible and enjoy a fine turntable.
I had a Sota and unfortunately I too had a SME V on it. The arm is just too heavy for that turntable...the springs/lead shot, just won't accommodate it. You might get in touch with SOTA and see if they have upgraded their springs since I had mine, but you're fighting a loosing battle with that combination.
That's surprising, Stringreen. If memory serves, the SOTA Star Sapphire/SME combo was a "classic" one back in the days of both products. But I am sure not arguing with your real world experience to the contrary.
I imported, distributed and owned Sota's back in the 80's and had no problems mounting SME V's. Balanced fine with the lead shot and no sagging.

Lubrication for the sapphire thrust pad was white lithium grease from memory.

You must always use the transit screws to lift the platter when moving. I have seen chips in the sapphire thrust pad when the table has been moved without using transit screws. The resulting sound is very grainy. You should check the thrustpad for damage, it is easy to replace in the field.

You can always bypass the suspension by removing the springs if you prefer. This can improve speed stability.
I had Sota turntables for over 20 yrs and never had a problem with thei SMEV that I used on a series 3 Star a few years back. The combined weight of the arm+armboard+lead shot in well had to come to a certain weight(can't remember exactly how much but for a heavier arm you just removd some of the lead). I suspect if anyone had problems with balancing a SOTA with SMEV that either the springs have sagged or the armboard was too heavy(non standard). The SOTA was designed to be pretty much plug & play as far as suspended turntables go. I recall when they first came out ease of set up vs the then ruling Linn was a major selling point. The springs were not set up for tweaking as I recall there was no mention in the users manual of adjusting them but if the springs have sagged you can take up some of the slack by tightening the screws on the underside . I would NOT recommend dismantling the springs as they are a right pain to reconnect . The platter bearing was not
designed to be user serviceable but if you want to lubricate it you need to undo the bolts under the bearing and remove the platter/bearing as a unit ( do up the screws that raise the platter off the bearing before you do this) . You can then remove a circlip and lift the platter off the bearing being careful not to lose the ball.
I have the SME 309 tonearm on my Sota Sapphire. Specs say it weighs 717g. It works just fine. I even have some lead for additional weight on the sub-chassis for perfect balance. The specs for the SME V tonearm says it weighs 720g. 3 grams is not an issue. Consider that the lead is needed to counterbalance the sub-chassis with the weight of the tonearm in the back corner. Also consider that the springs must be adjusted for the final, overall weight on the sub chassis. Don't try that unless you have patience and really know what you are doing.

Now, about lubrication. I bought my Sota new many years ago and I have done all of my own maintenance work on my tt. It really needs very little maintenance. I lubricate the platter bearing every 3-4 years. I used to use a lithium based grease but switched to a synthetic lube last time. The synthetic is stickier and made the bearing stiffer; but with the mass of the platter added to the bearing it made little difference.

It is not difficult to lube the main bearing; but it takes some mechanical ability. The platter has a shaft with a ball bearing on the end. That ball sits on the sapphire bearing. The shaft fits snugly in a bushing to support the platter horizontally. To disassemble the table follow these steps:
1. Reach under the turntable with the small allen wrench and crank up the two small allen screws that are used for shipping the turntable. These two screws take the load off of the sapphire bearing.
2. Remove the motor cover and belt.
3. At this point, I put my Sota clamp on the platter to help separate it from the sub chassis. I also put the turntable on its side to get to the bolts easier. (Remove your tonearm if you like before tipping the tt on its side.) (my lead shot is in a plastic bag.) I leave the tonearm on and have my wife or sons help hold the table secure.
4. Remove the 3 larger allen head screws and 1/2" bolt from the bottom. Remove the metal plate. Be sure to support the platter as you remove the bolt and screws because these bolts are holding it together.
5. Now remove the platter. Careful! it is heavy. The bearing assembly is what is bolted to the sub chassis. It comes out with the platter.
6. Set the platter down upside down. Now see the three allen head screws in the bearing assembly? Remove those. That allows you to slide out the keeper plate. That plate holds the bearing assembly together.
7. Remove the bearing assembly from the platter shaft.
8. Clean the shaft, ball and the bushing. Relube the ball and shaft. Re-assemble in reverse order.

A new belt is needed too every so often depending on how much you play records.

One last thing. Reference my system page. I added bushings to the sub chassis to constrain it in the horizontal direction. This stabilizes the platter speed as the drag changes at the needle. That drag changes the belt tension which can pull or push the sub chassis in the horizontal direction. That results in a micro speed change. The result was clearer highs.
Thanks, guys. I had no problem balancing the SME. This table really sounds great. Right now I've got a Lyra Delos mounted, but may put my Benz LP on it. I appreciate the maintenance tips.
Sean, I'm about to embark on replacing the arm on my series III star sapphire with an SME IV and was wondering if you found a step-by-step guide to balancing the suspended chassis. Any advice? I've never replaced an arm before on the turntable and wanted to know whT I'm in for!
I had a Star Saphire then Nova then Cosmos IV since 1988 and had the SME V on all 3 with no balancing/spring issues. Still have my Cosmos but with a still heavier Graham Phantom II with no sagging issue at the rear right side and that with a stiff Stealth Hyperphono cable attached to it.

Great sounding TT. You would have to spend quite a bit more on a German made TT to get better sonic performancesÂ… my opinion.