Saint-Sean’s 3rd Symphony


One of the reasons I bought my new GoldenEar Triton 1 speakers is that they have built-in sub-woofers which would enable me to hear the subterranean bass organ tones in the divine second movement of Saint-Sean’s 3rd Symphony. So far, the only recording of the many I’ve heard that fulfills that quest is the Mercury Living Presence disc with Paul Paray conducting.  All the other recordings fall short of delivering that magnificent sonority.
 I’m wondering if others have experienced that situation in the majority of recordings of this symphony’s 2nd movement, or do I have to start getting some room treatment.
I have no problems with bass in any other recordings.  Even solo organ recordings go deep and sound natural and fine.  I don’t want to boost the subwoofer controls on the speakers because, any higher than they are causes muddiness in everything else.
7c67ab18 c2ce 4b45 9523 fc4a71684ce0rvpiano
Sorry for the misspelling of the composers name. The auto-correct struck again.
It should read Saint-Saens.
How about Munch and the BSO on RCA Living Stereo? Or Barenboim and the CSO on DG? I like these two!
I recall there is one by Ormandy, that was one the first direct to disc recordings. Telarc?
B
Michael Murray on Telarc.
ANY system/room is challenged by that masterpiece.

I have several LP versions.
A couple faves:
The same Mercury Living Presence-Dupray
80’s DG digital recording with the Berlin Phil
RCA Living Stereo -Boston Symphony-Munch

Only the best treated/dedicated rooms can approximate the experience of hearing this performanc live.

I’m sure your Tritons are up to the task, but room treatment is mandatory.

My room unfortunately doubles as living space,so for serious listening, I do makeshift damping/reflection management.

Almost a religious experience, played loud with a nice glass of wine.
 I’m wondering if others have experienced that situation in the majority of recordings of this symphony’s 2nd movement, or do I have to start getting some room treatment.
I have no problems with bass in any other recordings.

If you are going to plumb the depths of your system and room,  you should definitely:

1 - Get good room treatment, talk to GIK Acoustics and look at their soffit traps.

2 - Consider an EQ for the LFE input.

The deeper  you go, the bigger the dragons. Subwoofers can open up most music, so if you are only hearing it with one particular recording, I'd say it's probably not set up fully.

My personal favorite of this Camille Saint-Saens piece is Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by Daniel Barenboim on Deutsche Grammophon. It has an energetic quality that I like and the organ, piano and orchestral instruments are all very well captured with large dynamics.

Get it on vinyl!

https://www.amazon.com/Saint-Saens-Symphony-Macabre-Bacchanale-Deluge/dp/B0000B09YY/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_1...
Thanks for all the recommendations of performances.  The Ormandy versions (there are three) all go very deep. Barenboim’s recording is very good in the bass and  well balanced in general. The Levine ‘80’s  Berlin Philharmonic version on DG was better in the bass than von Karajan’s.
I couldn’t find the Murray on Telarc.
The best bass presentations on my system were the classics: the Munch and the Paray.


erik_squires,

I noticed GIK Acoustics when I did some research recently.
 I’m not sure I need the treatment based on all the recordings I sampled.
Some were quite adequate.
  I suppose some room treatment would be beneficial, but I’m not sure if  it would be cost effective.
Apologies for the thread jack-

Any E. Power Biggs fans here?

After reading this thread, it inspired pulling out one of his "Historic Organs of..."
LP's 

Italy-Organs of Bologna, Brescia,Ravenna and Bergamot. Bellissima!

Made my dull breakfast of oatmeal(can't do the bacon/eggs)palatable.


@tablejockey .
I remember listening to a recording of the Arp Schnitger (sp?) organs by E.P. Biggs when I was in college. Sadly, it was through a pair of Bose 301's, but they were about as good as you could get back then.
My beloved Vandy's came out later...
Bob