Does the length of cables really matter?


Hej

I've read that a digital cable should be at least 1,25 meters for best sound. And now I friend of mine said that power cables should be at least 2 meters otherwise they will affect the sound negativly.

Is this really true? 

And if so; what about analog interconnects?


simna
Coaxial digital cables do have ideal lengths to minimize reflection and jitter. Those reflections are caused by the receiver impedance changing radically and causing reflections. Analog inputs do not have this sort of behavior, the impedance is constant.

I’ve never heard of a minimum requirement for power cables, but I do think having clean power, keeping your wall-warts out of your clean zone, and using shielded power cables can ensure the best performance.

Is this really true?

No.

And if so; what about analog interconnects?

They should be as short as possible. 1m is standard. Don't go longer unless you have to.


You can’t be two careful with those 1s and 0s. They get the j-j-jitters. 😛
Oh, I almost forgot. I don’t use cables. Should I recuse myself? 😳
Yup, telepathy introduces no signal degradation whatsoever.
@millercarbon

Thought so too.

@erik_squires 

Yes, I've heard that to about digital cables. But then it's strange that the manufacturers make them shorter. Or...?

A while ago I bought a Furutech The Astoria-E power cable (1,5 m) and yes it had a positive impact on the sound.
Yes, I've heard that to about digital cables. But then it's strange that the manufacturers make them shorter. Or...?


As I recall, there's a really short length, like half a foot, where the reflections don't matter.  I don't remember where I read this though.  Maybe on Wireworld's site?
Regarding the length of AES/EBU or coaxial S/PDIF digital cables see the excellent post by Kijanki near the beginning of this recent thread:

https://forum.audiogon.com/discussions/using-a-short-coax-cable

Regarding speaker cables and line-level analog interconnects, if the goal is to minimize the sonic effects of the cables the shorter the better.

Regarding phono cables, in the case of low output moving coil cartridges, while it might not make a great deal of difference it is preferable to minimize capacitance by minimizing cable length and/or choosing cables having low capacitance per unit length. See the post by Lyra cartridge designer Jonathan Carr ("JCarr") dated 8-14-2010 in the following thread:

https://forum.audiogon.com/discussions/dynavector-xv-1s-loading-question

In the case of moving magnet cartridges the sum of the capacitance of the phono cable, the capacitance of the tonearm wiring, and the input capacitance of the phono stage should fall within the range of load capacitance recommended for the particular cartridge by its manufacturer. Obviously this will often require some guesswork, as some of these parameters may not be specified, and some manufacturers of moving magnet cartridges don’t even provide recommendations for load capacitance.

Regarding power cords, see "Misconception No. 7" in the following paper by Shunyata. The importance of their recommendation figures to be dependent on the particular cord, the component it is being used with, and the other components in the system from which or to which component-generated noise may couple:

https://shunyata.com/2016/06/27/power-cord-misconceptions/

Regards,
-- Al

geoffkait19,656 posts02-04-2020 10:45pmYou can’t be two careful with those 1s and 0s. They get the j-j-jitters. 😛
--------------

There are no 0`s or 1`s in any cable, just an electric signal of 44khz
That’s even funnier than my answer. That’s gold, Jerry, Gold! 🤗
@almarg 

Thank you very much. Interesting reading.