Chord Hugo power supply help


I just moved and mixed up all of my wall warts...
Several fit the Hugo but I was warned to only use the factory one.  My original power supply never said Chord on it.  Any help identifying the correct one please.  Can I use a different 12volt psu?
elevick
Well, aside from buying from Hugo, iFi makes some very nice audiophile wall warts.

Check the current requirements. The Hugo should have something on it like "12 V 1.5A" or something. Make sure V are the same, and that your power supply A is equal or greater than what Hugo wants.

Best,
E
Based on the website, 12V, 0.5 A will work. If you like to leave it plugged in, this is a very nice options:

https://amzn.to/2rQtNiZ

If you want something absolutely killer though ....

https://amzn.to/2LxI6SG

You would have to roll your own power cable though, it has banana jacks on the back.
Hi Guys, thanks for trying.  It's easy to find one that should work.  However, I was told Chord requires their own PS for some unknown reason.  I'm hoping a Chord dealer can jump in here.
I would love to upgrade to a more robust PS if it's worth it.  There are plenty of higher quality ones available than the $5 wart that came with a $2000 DAC.
"Make sure V are the same, and that your power supply A is equal or greater than what Hugo wants."

I don't think you can go too much higher in the amps than what is specified for the unit.
P=VI, 12Vx1.5A= 18 Watts. That's the power requirement.

Is your Hugo the original battery powered version?  If so, I can supply the info from the power supply/charger from my Hugo.
RHL that is exactly what i need.  If its easier to just send a photo, please do.  Thanks, Emery  emfoods at yahoo .com
I sent you the photo.  Hopefully it matches yours.
@kalali

Yes, you could use a 100A supply on the device and the Chord would be safe. Let me help you understand why.

Your math is right, but you miss that current (I or A) is dependent on V and R. It's not the other way around.

We can induce the R based on the device rating. The device is rated at 0.5 Amps, that means the maximum current will be 0.5, in reality it will vary, but lets assume max.

R = 12 / 0.5 = 24
So we can assume the minimum R will be 24. So ....

I = 12 / 24 = 0.5
Having a power supply capable of 1,000 A still doesn't change the equation. The current will depend on V and R.

So, if you can't change R (the device) the only way to increase I is to increase the V. So, if you attached a 24V supply, THEN you'd have too much current and risk the device.

Hope this helps,
E
Hugo supply’s printed output 12V .6A  7.2W maximum.  This is directly from the device.
RHL bailed me out.  I had 4 but the original one doesnt say Chord on it   he sent me a picture.  Im all set now.  Thanks Everyone.
erik, thanks for the explanation. So you're saying since the R is device dependent and fixed, the V is what limits the amount of I delivered to the device. So technically the specified current is the minimum.
@Kalali

So technically the specified current is the minimum. 

Doh, so close, you had it all right until then. :)

For the wall wart, the A specified is the maximum it will deliver without dropping V, or shutting down or overheating. At or below the A rating, it will provide the voltage rated.

For an electronic device, A is always the maximum drawn during operation.For instance, this Parasound amplifier:

http://www.parasound.com/a23+.php
Would have 800 W marked on the chassis, but as you can read in the specs, the standby and idle power are a lot less.

So, to re-word your statement:


So technically the specified current implies the minimum R of the device


Yes, it does. If R is larger, then I will drop.


I totally get Eriks explanation.  However, Chord is finicky and claims that a higher amperage wont help and even may be detrimental.  That is why i was concerned about finding the correct one.  It may be due to the fact that the hugo is battery powered and may have issued sensing the fully charged state?   Not sure but hate to kill my favorite DAC.
@elevick

So you think the charging current is intended to be limited by the power supply.

That’s an interesting supposition!

Could be. That would be a little too well integrated for my tastes, but evidence of some pretty slick cost savings from the designer.


E