TRANSFORMER FOR JAPANESE DOMESTIC EQUIPMENT


After residing in Japan for a number of years, we have a nice system of higher end Japanese domestic gear.  If we decide to ship the audio equipment to the US, is there a loss of sound quality associated with running this Japanese equipment on a 120V to 100V step down transformer?

Thanks.
honeybee2012
Check with the manufacturer. Power transformers can be wound with 100V and 20V primaries so that they can be configured to run on 100, 120, 200 and 240 volts by either a switch, jumpers or both.
Thanks.  Does anyone have a suggestion for a US based company that builds audio quality transformers?
Honeybee, I think gs5556 was referring to the power transformers in your equipment.  Perhaps the manufacturers can tell you if the conversion can be made in the equipment, either by them or yourself.
Oh, got it.  I was thinking about an outboard solution.

thanks.
@honeybee2012 

I recently called Esoteric in Japan seeking to know if they'd change the transformer inside a unit purchased in Japan from 100v to 230v, they said sorry No.
on a Levinson Amp purchased in the US, the Co. Said I'd have to do it in the destination country as it won't allow it done in the States.

A service center told me using an external Transformer should be fine providing the Transformer has 3-5 times total maximum Wattage capacity of the units connected to it.

here is what I know;
that electric from power lines are many thousands of volts which is then transformed into lower voltage at the distribution ctr. Before it's sent to your home... So whether you're in a country that uses 100v or 230v the power is lowered from the powerlines before it reaches you.
So if your home has 230v lines & your equipments are 100v an external trans does the same thing as the one at the distribution ctr. by lowering the voltage yet again. I think a good quality external trans should be able to do this without any issues...
but if your home has 120v lines and your equipment are 230v the trans then needs to juice up the currents to feed your equipment, so if there are any issues with degradation of sound quality  it would be in this case where the currents from the transformer won't be of sufficient quality or quantity for your equipment...

You are lucky as equipment sold in Japan are usually 50-60 hertz whereas the ones in the states are 60h, meaning your equipment should match electric cycles in the states but one from the States won't match another country with 50h cycle...

many transformers advertise both step up and down & 50-60h, if it was me I'd connect all my purely 60h equipment to one external transformer, and 50 or 50-60h equipment to another external one providing that all the equipment being connected to a single trans are of the same voltage...
Only my $.02
hope someone with better knowledge can offer better advice.
lucidear
 " ... here is what I know ...  if your home has 120v lines and your equipment are 230v the trans then needs to juice up the currents to feed your equipment, so if there are any issues with degradation of sound quality  it would be in this case where the currents from the transformer won't be of sufficient quality or quantity for your equipment..."

Sorry, you're mistaken. While the step-up transfer increases the voltage, it does not increase the current. The current, measured in amperes, remains the same.
@Cleeds,
Thanks for your correction, any other mistakes anywhere?
This site has a bunch of converters.  One of these combine with a good quality line conditioner (like a Richard Grey 400/600) might be a good solution.  Hope this helps....


https://voltage-converter-transformers.com/collections/japan-up-down-voltage-transformers-100v-110v/...



Thanks, acbc.

Very helpful site.  Look like a great solution.