tonearm cable straight through or plug in


I am curious as to peoples take on whether one ought to plug in a tonearm cable - such as a Cardas Clear or a Nordost Tyr for instance, or if one ought to have a straight through cable from cartridge to amp - less connections etc...
parrotbee
Go straight through. When you count the number of metal-on-metal clip and solder joints eliminated it makes perfect sense, particularly for a low-level signal at the source. The only question is whether you're prepared to rewire a tonearm.
"traight through cable from cartridge to amp - less connections etc... "

You need to have a preamp. Its not optional.
Agree with ZD; I think Dgarretson had read "amp" to be "preamp" in your post. Only qualification is that you could use a standalone phono stage with enough gain and a volume control (like the Aesthetix IO) in lieu of the preamp. But, except in the unusual case of a cartridge that has one (like the Strain Gauge), you need the phono stage (or a preamp with one) for the RIAA equalization it provides.
Straight through is the best sound with a great cable.
Hi Parrotbee (PB)

based on my experiences, it depends....

Analog is all based on good setup, and whether One Shot Wiring would even work depends on the tonearm design, and if it even allows for One Shot complications.

A couple of questions.

Are you talking about doing a total replace of internal wires as DG suggests, or are you talking about running external wires and bypassing the armtube ?

We are not talking about wireless here. There are four wires and "physics" in play. Assuming we are discussing a pivot tonearm; this means anti skating needs to be considered and how the wires would be set up to deal with that. If they even can be. Just one consideration.

So....can you share the tonearm in question ?

PB .....straight through cable from cartridge to amp - less connections etc...

Assuming you are using an integrated amp (with phono) or did you mean pre-amp ?

Cheers
It is not just simply a question of "straight through" or not. You have to consider the wire gauge. In my experience, the stiffness or lack of flexibility of the wire can affect downforce, antiskate and tracking. Most wires that are advocated for tonearms I would be reluctant to use as they are too large a diameter, or have too stiff a covering.

It is all very well having minimal connections for the signal to negotiate. However, if the arm tracking is compromised your straight through connection is worth zip - you then just have better reproduction of errors and nothing more.

Some manufacturers use the arm wire as an antiskate device! Which, of course, is up to them if they wish to save on production costs.

I use a very fine wire which imparts minimal torque to the bearings - 12 strands of 0.04mm copper (silk covered).

Just my opinion.
John
"Some manufacturers use the arm wire as an antiskate device! Which, of course, is up to them if they wish to save on production costs."

How do know production cost is the reason for not using antiskate, and not a different reason like a better design?
How do you know production cost is the reason for not using antiskate, and not a different reason like a better design?

Because there are skating forces which affect all pivoted arms and omitting antiskate altogether is not good design. Likewise using a method like arbitrarily twisting wires when there are better ways to implement it, is not good design.

A cheaper product can, of course, be a good design. It depends on the design criteria, if one of those criteria is lower cost.

And as far as costs go, of course it is cheaper to omit antiskate. How much is saved depends on the nature of the device omitted.

Whether that saving is passed on to the customer is another matter.

And whether or not antiskate is used at all is another matter again, and to do with personal reference and nothing to do with good design.