The black hole of component repair?

Is the repair time for components typically measured in months? I have been fortunate over the last ten years with this hobby but at the end of January I had to send an amplifier and a DVD player in for repairs. The DVD player was past warranty and had to be sent to an independent service facility. They have had the player for 6 weeks and informed me today that the manufacturer in the UK sent them the wrong part (or maybe they ordered the wrong part) and they are waiting for the correct part. Looks like another 3-4 weeks before I see the DVD player. The amplifier was under warranty so that went back to the manufacturer. The amp sat on the floor for 6 weeks. I was told today that they have looked at it and that they have located the board they need to fix it. They may be able to get it installed in a week but can not make any promises. I am guessing that it will be another 3-4 weeks before I see the amplifier. I know some of this repair time is unavoidable but weeks can quickly turn into months especially with shipping time and components sitting around for weeks before they are even looked at. I now know why there are frequently things for sale on Audiogon where the listing states something like "just back from the factory in perfect working order". I guess when you send something in for repair you might just as well go ahead and replace the item right away and then sell whatever you sent in for repair when you finally get it back.
I had to send in my warranted Sony SACD player because it quit reading SACDs (funny enough). It took 3 days to get it back! I was shocked and elated - sorry you haven't had the same experience as me. Arthur
Two months seems to be about average for consumer electronics repairs.
Magnum-Dynalab repaired my amp and returned it to me in less than 3 weeks including the shipping time both ways to Canada. The amp was under warranty. I really like this company!

I had speakers repaired at a the local shop where I purchased them due to a broken driver. They were out of warranty and the company had changed hands meaning that the identical drivers were not available. It took MANY months to get them back, even after calling them repeatedly. They sounded O.K. with the new drivers, but one of the new drivers blew on about the third day. I decided that the problem must really be in the crossover. I still have the speakers and they are not repaired. I try not to shop at this hi end store anymore.

My car stereo took 3.5 months. The Eclipse 5444 head unit (VERY recommended for the car) broke under warranty and was sent back to the company. After several calls as I was loosing my patience, I found out that they were waiting for a part. I pushed and got them to replace the old unit with a brand new one as I had waited too long for the repair.
It took me a year to get an NHT Sub Two with blown mosfets back from a local shop... I forgot about it after bugging them for several months and then only remembered when I moved. Hopefully that isn't normal...
That`s the way it goes.
Sony took 6 MONTHS to fix my JA3ES Minidisc recorder.
It was sent back 4 times because they did NOT fix it
properly to begin with. It was OUT of warranty,
AND it only cost me $50 for a look over and shipping
the FIRST time to sony. It`s NOW working PERFECTLY!
HOWEVER, I took my
Pioneer Elite PDR-W37 CD recorder in the shop
in January, because the triple tray is broken,
and 3 MONTHS later, STILL NOTHING has been done to
fix it!
I have owned some Audio Note pieces since 1995 and when they required service and I used Nick Gowan at Truesound ( who sold me the stuff at retail originally. DAC required a chip; same day repair while I waited and he upgraded the tubes without asking and charged me a modest fee.

I blew up an Audio Note Conqueror (watch how you put those 300b tubes in....) and it required new caps and an power transformer ( least two transformers were required so maybe output). It was repaired in something like three days on demand; ie, did not wait for appointment and Nick expedited the process.

Never had a car audio unit fail.

I buy cheap DVD players so they are a disposable item. The Sony ns700 DVD player is now 5 years old with nary a hiccup.

JM Lab subwoofer solder connection failed and the sub required service. A friend who is an electrical engineer took it apart and fixed it in a matter of minutes. JM Lab would be well served to design their woofers with the amp in a vibration controlled compartment (not).
Edisilva:--- Didn't notice it was missing till you got moved???? Reminds me of when I was a little tyke of about 3 or4. Our family moved; but I found them.--- Then there is the thread I never started about things on hand needing repair.---Because I will always buy another amp/or whatever--when the old one quits---Then never send the thing in for repair. Kinda like selling the car when the ashtray is full.
I think this is a really big problem with high end. It would be great if our "hobby" didn't include so many boutique manufacturers who guard their schematics in fort knox, and insist -if they still exist- that you can only use their facility. Most electronic engineers can isolate the problem and their are quite a few DIY people who can do it themselves but getting old boards and the like can be nearly impossible. They have to let you try to use the repair facility of your choice, in the first place though. Its a really shameful situation. I have a 1992 Coda preamp that is in pristine condition that suddenly dropped a channel, I wouldn't even bother to send it to them, knowing full well that it will cost me an arm and a leg if they even have the parts for that model laying around.
Bryston has been very fast (< 1 week) to fix stuff for me. Teac was about 5 days. Guess I've been lucky.
Took my JVC HT rec/player back to the GoodGuys JANUARY SIXTH and am still waiting. Ran maybe 30DVD's through it before it wouldn't read any type of disc. While I don't miss it (love my 2 channel music only rig)its driving my wife nuts
It sounds like my experience has not been unique. The other part of this experience has been the misinformation and sugar-coated answers I have received when I have called to find out where things were with repairs. If you can't look at a component for 6 weeks and its going to take another X number of weeks to do the repairs, why not just tell me up front? I could have bought the same amplifier used 6 weeks ago and kept my system running for the last month and a half. OK, I am done venting.
Mchd1.---Yes, to heap insult upon injury---Your piece has a problem and everybody you come in contact just lies and lies. On a new JVC tv, I had an issue. I call Good Guys--they never heard of it. I call JVC---they never heard of it.---3weeks later,(maybe 6 hrs on hold) I get on the list and in 2weeks someone will come out and fix my set.----I go to avsforum;from the chat there, 1/2 the folks with my set have 'that' exact problem.
Looks like my fix wins the Fastest Repair Award so far...
To avoid all of the pain and aggravation noted above, there is always -- as noted by "racarlson" -- Bryston. A no-questions unconditional warranty that lasts forever; exceptional reliability; customer service and support that is beyond belief; and repairs accomplished within usually a 24 hour turnaround time. No, I have no connection whatsoever with the company, other than being a respectful and satisfied customer. I speak from personal experience and I simply applaud a company that cares for its customers, from senior management on down. Here is a true story to exemplify all of the above. About 4 years ago, I purchased a used BP-25 preamplifier that arrived with deep gouges on the top cover, not the minor scuffs cited in the description. On the Sunday prior to Thanksgiving, I sent an e-mail to Bryston and received a reply -- on a Sunday no less -- three hours later. Two days later, I was sent via UPS International Express, a new top cover; a new shipping carton; a completely new set of allen screws; and several huge and heavy professional grade allen wrenches and screwdrivers to accomplish the repair. Total cost, including international shipping, was $35. I was also sent an apology for Bryston even having to charge that amount of money. This is what it should be like! And that is why I am an unswerving Bryston loyalist. Always remember the first rule of high-end audio: when you turn it on, it plays.
I'll third Bryston. Seven days total time including rountrip shipping.

A lot of folks here put Bryston down for being a bit pedestrian, but they make a great product and back it with a true committment of 20 years.

I get a bit of a kick reading about (high end) components
needing service, and the time it takes under warranty.
After warranty they get a gun to the head on the repair charges.

I've also had good luck with Classe, and I'm sure there are many more great companys out there.Those are the ones that will get my business.
I always keep backup equipment in a bedroom system.
I had great experience with ARC.I had to send my Dac-3 for repair .They took four weeks ,maybe few days over of total time including shipping back and forth,and I live in Canada.Also very impressed with Krell.I called for a general question regarding my Krell transport and left a message,same afternoon Patrick from Krell called and left three messages trying to explain my question the best he could.I did appreciate that a lot.
I got one for you: I bought the Synergitics Research Quattro box--(Latest x2 shielding,device)--It has been back and forth since early January about 4xs. ea time I'm promised "1-day-turnaround"-- Their words exactly.
I still don't have this back, yet. Just so we know they are practically in my zip code--(So.Cal) It has NEVER worked in all this time. How'z that for service?? --- Next, I expect them to tell me it is now out of warranty.
Gee, and I thought taking just under a month to get my former Pass Labs X1 fixed and returned (not counting shipping time) was bad. Oh, I still do. ;-)
Unfortunately, my repair story may not be topped--at least I hope so as I’d hate to think that someone experienced a lengthier repair of a product. About 1990 I left an amp at a repair center for a "few weeks at the most" repair. I am still waiting for this to be completed. Yep, you read that right; that's the last time I saw my amp.

Every time I inquired, I was told a different story. As 3/4s of year of waiting approached, I asked for them to return the amp, regardless of condition. The repair center owner told me that they no longer had the amp as it was sent to a specialist in another state. I contacted this specialist who had some reason why the amp could not be returned immediately. What to do? Small claims court of course. At some point, the out-of-state specialist contacted me, at the insistence of his wife, to explain that he never had the amp, and he had been lying to cover up for some mischief done by the repair center.

I did go to court which was quite entertaining in part because I could play Perry Mason and ask the defendant questions, and because of the lies the defendant told the judge, which biased him against me before the case commenced.

Oh, this repair center is still in business.

Regarding a fantastic repair experience. The folks at QS&D (540/372-3711) repaired my Quads twice. Their turnaround, as I recall, was 2 days. I was awestruck; fantastic interest on their part to keep their customers listening to tunes.
My California Audio cd player took about 2 months to repair(when they were still in business). My daughter's Consonance integrated amp took about 3.5 months (that may have been partly her fault). On the other hand, the owner of PBN (they make Sierra and Montana equipment) flew out on his dime to my house for a service call within about 6-8 weeks (we just couldn't align schedules sooner). That six weeks didn't seem very bad at all given the personal service involved. I've been a long time customer and it was a unique problem so I'm not trying to suggest that's typical service at PBN, but the personal touch makes time fly. Good communication and an honest approach to good service makes a real difference.
On the other hand, I once had an issue with a Kora Eclipse, which I sent back to FRANCE and received it back in my hands 10 days after sending (with shipping covered both ways!).
My Sony 36XBR400 TeeVee died about two years ago.
I never got it fixed... just did without.
Even the dealer sez: "we'll pick up the 225lb monster, and give you a credit toward a new purchase if you want."
The bastard-child TeeVee sits, face to the wall, in shame.
I HATE getting stuff repaired.
(instead of being a TV couch potato, I am a music pumpkin.
Here we are 10 days later; still haven't got my piece back from Synergistics Research yet. I guess they are going for 4 months.-When I called last Friday they promised me it would go out on Monday and I should get it on Tuesday. (They just didn't say WHAT Tuesday.)
Funny Story:
When I was employed by Sony of Canada, I bought an MDSJE510 MiniDisc when it came out. In the first six months I sent it to service 3 times, each time for a separate fault. After the third time, I got into a testy debate with the head of Service for Western Canada, and her response was "The problem, Lee, is that your using it too much."
Well, since that candidness blew my mind, I unloaded it that week for $100 to a co-worker who was willing to take the risk, and I upgraded to the MDS-JA20ES, which has been plugging away ever since.
Leedistad, apparently, things last a lot longer when they're seldom used. I wonder why married men would ever need Viagra?
My Panasonic Plasma display got fixed in a week. They replaced a board. It seems that people who work on audio equipment could do better.

In the good old days I was able to troubleshoot and repair all my own audio equipment. Now it's a lot harder, and specialized tools may be necessary. Fortunately my newer equipment is very reliable.