Television technology - where are we?


A neighbor recently installed a 82" Samsung 4K tv. I was fairly impressed and thinking about doing the same. Is there other manufacturers, models and or sizes I should consider. I want to make this purchase and have it installed in time for 2019 college football season opener.
dawgbyte
With the laser mentioned by dweller, check out Next Tech on YouTube for how they work, the latest, and how to save some money by buying direct from China for say, a 100" screen. He saved a bundle on that endeavor.

As for what you can buy stateside, I'd go with an LG OLED TV. Mine is almost two years old and the tech has improved dramatically. They've managed to boost the brightness to almost what a LED TV can reach, which by the way, is way overstated. LED TVs have been tested and found wanting in their brightness specs. 

What I saw at a local Costco (the LG OLED TV) froze me in my tracks. 
The price gave me the shivers too.

All the best,
Nonoise
Man I dread when my pioneer elite kuro plasma bites it!
Too bad Panasonic doesn't sell consumer TV's in the US -  they make a really nice OLED.  You wouldn't miss your Kuro at all. Sony are also very nice apparently and both buy their OLED panels from LG who also make a nice OLED screen.

I find LED screens look phony in comparison lots of brightness and over saturated colour but not nearly as natural.  

As always go out and judge for yourself I've been running an OLED since they became somewhat affordable and I don't miss my plasma one bit.
I gave my Kuro away after i got a Sony master Series 60 inch. But i do regret not keeping it. 
dawgbyte,

+1 for LG OLED.
     The Samsung QLED 4K  hdtvs are very good but, when seen side by side with an LG OLED, it'll be obvious to you that the OLED is clearly superior.  The Samsungs are Transmissive, meaning they use a backlight shining through a grid of tiny red, blue, yellow and red sections of Samsung patented crystals to represent the color in each of the 4K pixels.  OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) technology is Emmissive, meaning that it uses no powerful back lighting or tiny crystals and light is emitted directly from each individual pixel.  Each of the 4K pixels contains an organic carbon based material that emits its own light individually from each pixel in the color directed.  Each individual OLED pixel can also be turned off for excellent black levels and contrast ratios.  The Samsungs and other LED hdtvs do not have the capacity to turn off individual pixels and therefore cannot match OLED hdtvs black levels and contrast ratios.

     Prior to 4K, Panasonic and Samsung plasma 1080P hdtvs were considered the best hdtvs.  They were considered superior to other LCD  (Liquid Crystal Display) hdtvs because of similar differences in technology. The LCD hdtvs used a powerful backlight shining through a grid of 1,080 tiny red, blue, yellow and red liquid crystals to represent the color in each pixel.  Plasma used no powerful backlighting or tiny liquid crystals.  Instead, each of the 1,080 pixels contains neon and xenon gas that emits its own light individually from each pixel in the color directed. Each individual plasma pixel can also be turned off for excellent black levels and contrast ratios.  The LCD hdtvs do not have the capacity to turn off individual pixels and therefore could not and cannot match plasma hdtvs black levels and contrast ratios.

     The main point is that QLED is closer to regular old LCD than it is to OLED, which most experts consider a distinctly different type of television, much like plasma was before it.  
    Here's a CNET article that does a good job of explaining in more detail the differences between QLED and OLED.

https://www.cnet.com/news/qled-vs-oled-samsung-tv-and-lg-tv-2019-comparison/

Tim