SME 309 Headshell Postition


Hey Folks,

For the first time I removed the headshell from my 309 so I could send my Kleos in for a checkup. Upon reinstalling said Kleos and pushing in the headshell I noticed a spring action. Do I push against the spring action and tighten or not? It's another one of those procedures where we humanoids need another arm/hand combo.

Thanks,
Robert A. Ober
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You push it in to contact/compress the springs. Then align the bolt with the slot in the front of the arm.

Vinyl Engine has the owner's manual. Page 15 shows the headshell install details.

http://www.vinylengine.com/library/sme/309.shtml
Hello,

Thanks for your reply. Unfortunately the manual is not specific. Once the headshell is pushed in, one cannot see the slot can one?

Thanks Again,
Robert
Anybody else want to help? I would really like to get this right.

Thanks,
Robert A. Ober
Robert, I'm sorry but the owner's manual is VERY specific on how to do this. Read numbered pictures 115, 116, 117, and 118. This tells you EXACTLY how to do it. Not sure why you're having trouble?
Push the headshell in untill before spring action of the pins.Then put the locking allen bolt in the headshell's hole and gently push the headshell again further back.When the springs are compressed the bolt will fall through the slot by itself.Then tighten the bolt.Make sure the locking nut at the bottom side of the headshell is in place.Although glued,these sometimes fall.
Push the headshell in and hold it in that position with one hand then with your other hand put the bolt in and tighten it down,once this is done you can release the headshell and you are ready to go!
I forgot to mention. Make sure you don't lose the nut that the bolt goes into,they are known to fall out!
"Push the headshell in and hold it in that position with one hand then with your other hand put the bolt in and tighten it down,once this is done you can release the headshell and you are ready to go!"

Yep, that's close to what I have done but I am not comfortable about the fact that one is pushing against the tonearm bearings. I have tried to have the bolt in and hold the tonearm with one hand and tighten with the other. Again, it's one of the procedures that makes me think we need another arm/hand combo.

"Robert, I'm sorry but the owner's manual is VERY specific on how to do this. Read numbered pictures 115, 116, 117, and 118. This tells you EXACTLY how to do it. Not sure why you're having trouble?"

I suppose part of it is my reluctance to push against the bearings. Also my turntable light is missing since my last move so it is not easy to see when the hole is aligned with the slot. But then I mentioned something like that didn't I? Despite my sarcasm, I do appreciate you trying to help.

"Push the headshell in until before spring action of the pins.Then put the locking allen bolt in the headshell's hole and gently push the headshell again further back.When the springs are compressed the bolt will fall through the slot by itself.Then tighten the bolt."

Gonna try that now.

Thanks to all,
Robert A. Ober
PS: I think I have in correctly but I will try the above to be sure.
"Gonna try that now."

Did that and I think it is in the same place but that's ok. I apparently got the azimuth better because the vocals are smoother without loosing any detail. I did verify the alignment is ok. I may tweak it a bit this weekend or try a different alignment since I now have the SmarTractor.

Off topically, I compared my eary pressing US Decca Tommy to the new Geffen/QRP Kevin Gray one. The new one sounds duller and the drums lack the slam I have always enjoyed on this LP. BTW, my original that I believe my sister bought when the LP was released is better than another early copy I have. My original does not have the upward tilt that some folks have mentioned and is present on my second copy.

Thanks Folks for the help.

Y'all be cool,
Robert A. Ober