Are the new Ohm Walsh speakers Audiophile quality?


Considering buying the Ohm Walsh 2000 Tall but very few reviews has me questioning there quality. Any thoughts?
sixsigmaguy
I appreciate these inputs as I continue to ponder this purchase. Thank you. 
I have a larger main living area that opens to the kitchen and up to a catwalk above for the upper level. Evan said I need a 4000 for this space. I ordered them new without ever hearing them. Three month wait. Should be here in April. Who cares, it's only money. 

I spent the money on these because I never sit when I listen to music. I move around. I also listen to a lot of live recordings, and loudly. 

I have not settled on my electronics yet. Perhaps @mapman can help me out. I have needs for a setup that is family friendly, so a pre and amp with 12v triggers is intriguing. But, I really think it would be fun to put a PrimaLuna preamp with a solid state amplifier on it. Is a tube pre on these new 4000s a good idea or should I stick with solid state all the way?

I think OP is right to wonder about the power requirements - Ohm told me to go big. 
Class D for the 4000s? Or AB? I've been considering Peachtree amp500, or a Rotel RB-1582 MKII, or a Musical Fidelity M6s, or a Parasound A21+. In all cases I'm at 200wpc minimum per Evan and John's advice. But would 500 watts be too much? Are my kids going to blow these speakers up? Would a Rotel RC-1590 preamp with that Rotel 1582 amp be too harsh in the upper end, or would a tube pre soften things up in a good way? I'm not afraid to use tone controls.

I've also considered Nord Acoustics class D amps. For some reason I'm afraid of class D? 

These are the questions literally keeping me up at night. Nerd alert. 
Tube preamp works great. Just make sure amp input impedance is 40-60kohm or higher for minimal distortion and best results.
200w/ch into 8ohm is good. 500 will only push things further.
My setup with larger Ohms is Audio Research sp16 tube pre to Bel Canto ref1000m Class D amps 500 w/ch into 8 ohm doubling power into 4. Doubling power into 4 ohms is another desirable amp attribute for best performance with larger Ohms.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/96SbeuZEWj5ueG8T8

No reason to fear Class D. Good ones sound great these days and Ohms love it. More bang for the buck and more efficient/cost effective/compact and easy to deal with. God Bless technology and innovation!
I've had my Walsh 4's since 1986; they're rated at 4 ohms but they're actually 6 ohms.  From all the tech reviews I've read on the Walsh drivers over the years they usually end up being a nominal 6 ohm load and fairly easy to drive.  However the Ohm spec on sensitivity has always been somewhat optimistic; my 4's are actually 83 db with all switches in the center position as opposed to the published 89 db, that means 3 times more power required.  My vintage Marantz 2325 with 125 wpc sounds good driving the 4's but my NAK  PA-7A MKII with 225 wpc sounds great. Bottom line: they love horsepower.
I've had a pair of 5000s since 2012. They sound wonderful loud and I do love loud. I have the classic Maxell man poster right above my stereo. You know the one that looks like he is blowing away. With Classic Rock and Grunge the Ohms are supurb. I did blow out a tweeter and ad to send them back for repair. John installed a protection mechanism that lights up and burns excess energy when needed. I haven't blown a tweeter since 2013. I drive them with a Bryston 14b3 600 watt amp that tests out at 680 watts on the bench. I'm a proponent of linear power. The more you have will carry over to a more realistic presentation on speakers that are not as efficient. The properly powered bigger Ohms will make you jump out of your seat during dynamic peaks like JCM drum in "Jack and Diane" or EJ "Someone Saved My Life Tonight" they can pressurize a properly matched room. About the protection mechanism. It hasn't flashed since I swapped out thoss speaker cables with the mystery box.