Wire twisting polarity.


Within audio circuitry wires are often twisted, and sometimes shielded. Looking from the source to the load, should the twists be clockwise or counterclockwise? Does it make a difference if I am in the southern hemisphere?
eldartford
Assuming the audiophilic truth that everything makes a difference, the answer is yes. And thank you for bringing up something I've never thought about.
The spin of the earth only affects cyclones and the water going down your drain. The electrical forces behave the same in both hemispheres!
The formula for the relationship of current and magnetic fields etc can be demonstrated by using a hand and how the fingers curl... but naturally I forgot it ... oh... 30 years ago. Some electronics guru can post it. anyway, Idon't know if the direction of twist matters... or if wires twisted in pairs and bundled with others in twisted pairs, would it be better to have pairs twisted in opposites turnings? or same turnings?
My own latest idea is to take all the four wire connectors in my computer, and make them into double twisted pairs.
Elizabeth, the rule you are talking about is called the Right-Hand Rule.
I don't think it matters - each successive twist has the opposite field polarity of the previous. And, no, the hemisphere has no effect. Coriolis "force" mainly affects air mass and water dynamics.
above is referring to the "right hand thumb rule"
Looking from the source to the load, should the twists be clockwise or counterclockwise? Does it make a difference
The twists configuration *may* or *may not* make an audible difference; you simply have to try it out within the context of the specific application. I am not even going to hazard a guess.
But it doesn't really matter whether you're in your listening room, in Antartica, or on Mars.