Power cond from Furman & PS Audio which one?

I am looking into purchasing a new power conditioner. I currently own a Power Wedge model 116. The models i am looking at are from Furman model 20PFI & PS Audio Power Plant Premier. Do either one of these units limit current & dynamics? Are they best used for source components only? I would like to be able to plug my Plinius 9200 into which ever conditioner i purchase. Thanks for any feedback.
I owned the Premier and the 9200 but not at the same time. In my experience, and most folks as well, you will not be able to plug your integrated into the Premier without affecting the dynamics, and rolling off the upper midrange and highs. I'd go straight to the wall with the 9200 and get a good ac receptacle. If you can, a dedicated line too. I know of a few guys who have all their gear plugged into the Premier and like the results, but only a few. It is a matter of a person's individual system and the sound they like. But, the odds are against you getting good results plugging electronics into it. I used the Premier for my cdps only. Even used with sources only it limited the high end and dynamics somewhat. Some guys have had great results with the Premier and would not be without it. So, it's a matter of trying it out to see if it works well within your setup. You might like what it does or might not. One great thing about the Premier is it's resale value. Purchase it hear used at a good price, and if you want to resell later you'll likely get an equal return on your original investment. I've never used Furman. Also, you're comparing an AC regenerator (Premier) to an AC conditioner (Furman). You risk the sonic quality of your system with most of these devices, in my opinion. If you can't try the device out before you buy, then buy at a good used price and make sure it will resell fairly easy if it doesn't reap improvements in your system. Good luck.
When I first acquired my PPP, it seemed to constrict dynamics; but the longer I used it, the better it kept sounding. I have all components except subwoofer connected to it. It would seem from my experience, that it requires a burn in period just like any other component. I have nearly 175 hours on all components now including the PPP and it continues to sound better every time I listen.
Definitely go with a PPP, and have Tek Line Cables upgrade it for you to a 20 amp IEC. This increases current flow by around 30% which may be the differene for those who found it restricted dynamics
Check out the reviews on the Audience Adept Response power conditioners. They come in 1, 6 or 12-socket models, all with the same electronics. This is passive conditioning, but all the reviews rave about the dynamics, so I decided to try it. I have the 1-socket model, powering my Musical Fidelity Nu-Vista M3 integrated amp (250 watts per channel into 8 ohms) via an Audience Power Chord and the music is very lively, dynamic and lifelike.

They are expensive new, but can be found used. They come with a 10-year warranty, which I understand is transferrable to new owners.

By the way, although the Power Plant Premier regenerates the sine wave, it then runs it through a passive conditioner at the final stage before output. That passive conditioner is also sold separately as the PS Audio Quintet. I have also read that the PPP, when faced with peak power demands that exceed its capacity, it sends unconditioned power through to meet the demand. This means that it will sound much better on a system that does not over-tax it.

Good point regarding over taxing. Since my last post, I decided to see what would happen if I removed one of my amps from the PPP and plug directly to the wall. For the life of me, I cannot believe how much better everything sounds now.

The amp that drives the woofers is the one I removed, and now there is much better slam to the bass. But even the mids and highs are more crisp and smooth, which indicates that I may have been overtaxing the Plant with 2 amps. The other amp drives the midrange/tweeter.