Lifespan of Power amps


What is a reasonable amount of time a power amp should perform without trouble, or need replaced? If kept in good, clean condition I'm guessing 20-25 years, is this correct? I have an 18 year old power amp and am just trying to figure how long it will be until I will need a new one. Does anyone think the technology is the same today as it would have been 18 years ago for amplifiers?
fruff1976
There have certainly been changes to the technology, but no where near as extreme as in other components, like CD players (dah, obviously, sorry about that no brainer). How long should an amp last? That is a tough question, a well made amp should last an awefully long time, decades. The capacitors and some other items may need to ultimately be replaced, but they should keep on ticking.

It is not unusually to see very old tubes amps still working and being sold. With your 18 Y/O amp, if you love everything about it, I would consider having it serviced and some of the components replaced (caps, etc. . .). There is no reason that it shouldn't still be a very good performer.
It's the capacitors. Caps last around 20 years. If you replace them BEFORE they die/break/explode, you'll have another 20 years.
I have a 15 year old CJ amp that's still going strong and sounds great... I plan on having my amp modified/upgraded Bob & Gary Backert. Hopefully I'll get another 15 years. :O)
I have a Kenwood Supreme 700m, built in the early 70s, recapped, re-transistored, etc about two years ago.
Electrolytic Capacitors are a fact of life in amplifiers, tube or solid state. They last about 20-25 years, which is a sort of half-life, IOW about half of them will be bad in about 20-25 years. Unlike radioactive isotopes, though, the rest will be following soon after. By 30 years they all should be replaced without question.
It's the capacitors. Caps last around 20 years. If you replace them BEFORE they die/break/explode, you'll have another 20 years.

Agree 100%.

Electrolytic Capacitors are a fact of life in amplifiers, tube or solid state. They last about 20-25 years, which is a sort of half-life, IOW about half of them will be bad in about 20-25 years.

I would add that if you buy an amp that has not been in use for several years then it can increase the risk that a cap will blow up when you first turn it on. If you store expensive gear then I'd suggest plugging it in once every six months to a year.
So other than tubes, capacitors should be the only parts that "wear" out and need replacing (assuming you take good csare of your equipment)?
No- connectors, switches and controls are subject to corrosion and transistors can develop leakage and other issues due to the same. There seems to be no free lunch.
Atmosphere,should I sell my pricey equipment and go back to collecting Martin Acoustic Guitars(lifetime warrantee...."improves with age")? -:)

Best regards
Sirspeedy, the effects of corrosion can be reduced by proper care. The tin plate on a good tube socket for example can reliably last for 30-40 years. OTOH if you store it in the basement or the garage where it can be attacked by humidity or moisture, the life of the connectors and filter capacitors can be really shortened.

If you stored a Martin (never a good thing for a string instrument as you know) it would suffer too. What's the saying? there's no free lunch? no free cigar?
No free lunch, no free cigar, but lots of whine.
It sounds like my current equipment should outlast my ears, whew!