WiFi extender needed for residence?


Can this actually improve sound quality?  They're very reasonable on Amazon.  I've seen some priced at less than $30.  I'm not experiencing dead spots but I noticed that while streaming Tidal it will mysteriously stop at times. My residence is pretty small (1300 to 1400 sf).  I'm going thru two walls to reach my Bluetooth receiver.  thanks.
russellrcncom
I'd be thinking a different direction, a better router.
Another option to consider is a extender that uses the power lines this will allow you to get wifi in other rooms also allows for a hard wired connection.
Extenders actually cut the bandwidth being served by half, so you might get extended coverage, but only half the speed. The better thing to do is buy a decent wireless access point and connect that to your router, and either disable the router’s internal access point or set it to a different channel range. 

I have a 3000 sq ft house and one Cisco Small Business WAP4410N that’s centrally located on my first floor. I have coverage everywhere indoors, upstairs, in the basement, outside in the yard and driveway and on the back deck. 
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I'm confused. You're asking about WiFi extender, but mentioned Bluetooth receiver?
Long live the wire!!!

wireless is so over used it just makes me laugh. We all want easy so we use wireless without an understanding of the technology.

First off it is a shared medium, all things that attach to it share the bandwidth. It is half duplex so it is tranmit or receive but not at the same time. It steps down to the lowest connection standard connected to it. (That’s why most use dual radios now) 
Other electronics can cause interference with the wireless. 

All these problems can be overcome with a direct connection from Ethernet. (Provided you run it to the IEEE standards. 

Ok ok so running a wire is too much work... as stated above do not use a so called extender. A better radio and or additional radio in the house is the right way to do it.  If you are running your music on it I would suggest dedicating a radio and making sure the channel is at least 2 off your other wireless in the house. This will prevent the other bandwidth hogs in the house from robbing your Tidal of wireless bandwidth. 

For myself I will always go with the dedicated wire 😉. It is the simplest way to not introduce problems.

Oz
Tidal suggests 10Mb/s for 3 or more FLAC streams, and no less than 5Mb/s for a single stream. What is the data rate for your modem?

I have a >4000sq ft house and I use an extender.
The house is long and the cable modem and the AC1750 WIFi router is in the basement at one end and an AC1750 extender was added in the  middle to get acceptable use of the internet throughout.
My Spectrum connection is 120Mb/s on a good day, so the fact that it is split equally between the two routers is generally of no consequence as far as Tidal is concerned. However, there are times when Tidal is stalling and buffering and that has nothing to do with the internal wifi set up but everything to do with Spectrum (and /or Tidal). I've run internet speed tests when these events occur and sometimes it's Spectrum- it can drop down to less than 20Mb/s- or Tidal that's at fault.
The speed of the main router is 650Mbps for the 5GHz connection and for the extender 350Mb/s so neither is the bottleneck. The 5GHz connection largely immunizes the system from interference from microwaves, cell phones etc. Running ethernet would not, alas, improve the situation in this case.
Another option when you can't run a cable is to use a mesh network - our house has very thick internal stone walls that are a nightmare for wifi; I use a series of  daisy-chained google mesh stations to get the signal to where it needs to be. These create an internal high speed network that hops from room to room then when a device tries to connect the mesh works out which station offers the strongest signal and routes the traffic to that one.