Why Power Cables Affect Sound


I just bought a new CD player and was underwhelmed with it compared to my cheaper, lower quality CD player. That’s when it hit me that my cheaper CD player is using an upgraded power cable. When I put an upgraded power cable on my new CD player, the sound was instantly transformed: the treble was tamed, the music was more dynamic and lifelike, and overall more musical. 

This got me thinking as to how in the world a power cable can affect sound. I want to hear all of your ideas. Here’s one of my ideas:

I have heard from many sources that a good power cable is made of multiple gauge conductors from large gauge to small gauge. The electrons in a power cable are like a train with each electron acting as a train car. When a treble note is played, for example, the small gauge wires can react quickly because that “train” has much less mass than a large gauge conductor. If you only had one large gauge conductor, you would need to accelerate a very large train for a small, quick treble note, and this leads to poor dynamics. A similar analogy might be water in a pipe. A small pipe can react much quicker to higher frequencies than a large pipe due to the decreased mass/momentum of the water in the pipe. 

That’s one of my ideas. Now I want to hear your thoughts and have a general discussion of why power cables matter. 

If you don’t think power cables matter at all, please refrain from derailing the conversation with antagonism. There a time and place for that but not in this thread please. 
mkgus
@mkgus

I am indeed not talking about power supplies, which can make a difference. I’ve seen products that have power supplies restrict their performance as the amp modules were capabale of more wattage than the power supply could offer. And thus, since more wattage means more dynamics, I agree with you on that point. Not so sure I agree with over-engineered and rated for more than what is needed; like I suggest more wattage for power amps that what is needed as most amps have more distortion at the top of their range and more heat dissipation which can reduce its lifespan, but if an amp didn’t have those issues, then I wouldn’t reocmeneded more wattage than necessary, same goes for power supplies, now I don’t know if the power supplies aren’t as good when you get close to their limits, if they do, then yes, get a better one that what it’s rated for, though I would argue what it’s rated for is thus incorrect.
  

I am disagreeing with the fact that changing the power cords can make your bass deeper and give you a wider soundstage.
Trolling, obviously. Never trying, or listening, for himself. I am done with this guy !
So the guy 'disagrees'? He is just guessing/ making up fantasies. Good luck with that stuff.He says folks need to prove (to him?) NOT. all I need is to listen, I do not need to prove to him anything. Nada, zero. Ever notice these naysayers jump into threads promoting PC and IC. They never seem to have their own threads... Why? No one would post to it! LOL
@elizabeth

I would like any possible explanation on how a power cord can extend treble response.

Indeed, if it sounds better to you, go for it. Just keep in mind it’s all placebo.

Here’s a recent news article on that even if knowing something is a placebo, it still works, which covers the bases for those people saying they never believed in it before, but now do. If sugar pills can legit cure illnesses, you can bet it can make you think the bass is better.
I can't believe you're bringing up placebo. That dog won't hunt. Anyone who falls for placebo won't, in the long run. Patients will eventually take a turn for the worse, and/or die. 

Anyone who's tricked into hearing something will shortly right their hearing after the "test" is over. It's not permanent. That's why it's a cheap parlor trick. That, and it goes both ways: those who refuse to believe they won't hear something won't. They'll just fall back on their math, manual, and cite others, sometimes because they simply can't hear all that well, or they have an agenda.

All the best,
Nonoise