Why Power Cables Affect Sound


I just bought a new CD player and was underwhelmed with it compared to my cheaper, lower quality CD player. That’s when it hit me that my cheaper CD player is using an upgraded power cable. When I put an upgraded power cable on my new CD player, the sound was instantly transformed: the treble was tamed, the music was more dynamic and lifelike, and overall more musical. 

This got me thinking as to how in the world a power cable can affect sound. I want to hear all of your ideas. Here’s one of my ideas:

I have heard from many sources that a good power cable is made of multiple gauge conductors from large gauge to small gauge. The electrons in a power cable are like a train with each electron acting as a train car. When a treble note is played, for example, the small gauge wires can react quickly because that “train” has much less mass than a large gauge conductor. If you only had one large gauge conductor, you would need to accelerate a very large train for a small, quick treble note, and this leads to poor dynamics. A similar analogy might be water in a pipe. A small pipe can react much quicker to higher frequencies than a large pipe due to the decreased mass/momentum of the water in the pipe. 

That’s one of my ideas. Now I want to hear your thoughts and have a general discussion of why power cables matter. 

If you don’t think power cables matter at all, please refrain from derailing the conversation with antagonism. There a time and place for that but not in this thread please. 
mkgus
@mrdecibel

I’m not the one claiming power cables can alter soundstage width.

I’ve seen measurements of some gear that benefits from a cleaner power supply, but even the wall power usually didn’t have high enough distortion to matter. But cases can be made.

I’ve seen that Toslink cables can measure differently and that USB cables of longer length are worse (a 3” generic cable beats a 10ft thousand dollar cable every time), but, any decent DAC will reduce the jitter to below audible levels.

However, I’ve never seen any product that benefits from a better power cable, unless the benefit being discussed is better EMI handling, but even then ferrite  beads exit. If you have anything to show that power cables do matter, I’d appreciate a link.
@Mzkmxcz We might be talking about different things. Mains leakage and EMI are important considerations. I was referring to over-engineered power supplies as a means to improve sound quality and dynamics. It’s long been known that using large power supplies rated many times in excess of what is “required” provides better sound. PS Audio was one of the first ones to discover this and bring it to market with their preamp line and then eventually all/most of their products. 
@mkgus

I am indeed not talking about power supplies, which can make a difference. I’ve seen products that have power supplies restrict their performance as the amp modules were capabale of more wattage than the power supply could offer. And thus, since more wattage means more dynamics, I agree with you on that point. Not so sure I agree with over-engineered and rated for more than what is needed; like I suggest more wattage for power amps that what is needed as most amps have more distortion at the top of their range and more heat dissipation which can reduce its lifespan, but if an amp didn’t have those issues, then I wouldn’t reocmeneded more wattage than necessary, same goes for power supplies, now I don’t know if the power supplies aren’t as good when you get close to their limits, if they do, then yes, get a better one that what it’s rated for, though I would argue what it’s rated for is thus incorrect.
  

I am disagreeing with the fact that changing the power cords can make your bass deeper and give you a wider soundstage.
Trolling, obviously. Never trying, or listening, for himself. I am done with this guy !
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