Why none of high-end speakers offer Speakon?


Hi everyone! I am kind of new to all the high-end electronics and have started to build a system. I have already payed 8K for a tube pre-amp (Einstein The t8be MK2) and will be buying speakers and amplifiers next. I have noticed though that all the pro-audio equipment use speak on connection, while none of the high-end amps or speakers use this. Just looking superficially, it seems this type of a connection will be better than either spade or banana plugs. Why don't the high-end speakers offer this type of a connection? same goes for amps. Anyone can comment on this?

This whole thing started to kind of worry me. Looking at pro-audio equipment, one can buy a 2000 watt amp for about 1-2K. Is pro-audio used in recording studios that bad? Did I just pay 8K for a preamp for just its looks and hype?
gago1101
Is it that bad? Yes. Most pro gear is designed to stand abuse first and foremost; sound is a lesser consideration. I guarantee that GOOD recording studios DO NOT use cheap high powered amps. Check out some of the forums run by serious recording engineers. My REL subs use Speakon; there is nothing wrong with them. It is a chicken and egg thing; neither the cable manufactures nor the equipment makers will start using them until the other goes first and at present there is no demand that either do so. Remember that universal compatibility is much more important in pro gear than home and locking connectors are better in a situation where the equipment may have multiple users. There are crossover products that are used by both home and recording/broadcast studios. GamuT was a pro audio company, ATC and B&W are used in recording studios, Spendor in broadcast ones; Berry Diament uses Maggies as monitors; Tony Faulkner uses Quads. Also remember how bad a lot of records sound; guess what was used to make them. Garbage in, garbage out; pro or home, good equipment is seldom cheap; can you overpay, sure. Do some serious research before you buy and listen as much as you can; then buy what makes you happy whatever it was designed for.
For my Vapor Audio speakers I use custom made (gold plate over copper) Speakon connectors to handle the connection from external crossover section to woofer/tweeter. Still standard WBT binding posts for amp hookup though. Speakons are a great design though, and I like the minimal conductive material idea, like Eichmanns.

I doubt you'll see any home audio speakers use them for amp hookup simply because nobody makes wire terminated with Speakons.
Genesis has used Speakon connectors with their bass amps/speakers but that's a pair for 2 channels and 2 accelerometers per side. I like them and have used them for other projects, including liquid level and 24V controls(Neutrik PowerCon is approved for 120V and has similar appearance). Perfect fit for 14/3 SOW and no soldering required.

To get 2000 watts out of a standard 15A outlet would require over 100% efficiency. I call "shenanigans"! For milliseconds?... How long would you need 2000W?

As far as "looks and hype", join the crowd.
Bryston is the brand often used in ther recording studios for monitorring amplification and recording demos.
2...4000 WPC isn't necessary in studios at all. Among the pro power monsters I would say that lower-powered Crown XLS series are descent performers.
The pro-grade preamps do reach the price point of $8k+ due to the number of important features suitable for pro audio.
As to Speakon I too believe that it's the best way to connect/terminate speaker cables.
I have a pair of the weirdest speakers when it comes to connections. For the connection from the amp to the speaker, it only has a terminal strip (remember those things that had tiny screws?). Fortunately, the crossover is contained in three external boxes, so I could just add binding posts. The connection from one of the boxes to the woofer portion of the speaker uses a speakon connector.
Oh yes! Forgot about simpliest answer...
Because high-end speaker cable brands are not terminated with speakon.
whether in the studio..or at home...it starts and ends with 'the room'.
"Pro", in this case, means both studio and P.A.. Entirely different.
>Gago1101
>I am kind of new to all the high-end electronics and have started to build a system. I have already payed 8K for a tube pre-amp (Einstein The t8be MK2) and will be buying speakers and amplifiers next. I have noticed though that all the pro-audio equipment use speak on connection, while none of the high-end amps or speakers use this.

Linkwitz Orion speakers (http://www.theorionspeakers.com/, starting at $14,750 although exotic lumber will increase the price) built by Wood Artistry have 8 pole Speakon connectors to accommodate active tri-amplification (with one amplifier channel per bass driver if you prefer) with one inoffensive looking cable.

>This whole thing started to kind of worry me. Looking at pro-audio equipment, one can buy a 2000 watt amp for about 1-2K. Is pro-audio used in recording studios that bad?

No. Pro amps without fan cooling (which raises the noise floor) can actually be more suited to music reproduction than consumer amps.

The peaks on a nice jazz recording take one hundred times more power (20dB) than the average playback level.

Consumer amplifiers are designed around test signals with peaks double the average power level (3dB) and consequently for given weight, size, and materials costs can't handle peak levels as high as pro sound units. This is because of the FTC's response to creative advertising claims which required all consumer stereo and mono amplification equipment to be rated with sine waves having a 3dB crest factor following a warm-up for an hour at 1/3 rated output where the output devices are dissipating even more heat than at full output. The net effect

The FTC doesn't limit pro-sound power ratings that way.

I've built amplifiers which are thermally limited to ~20W average but can peak over 500W (like a consumer amplifier rated at 250W) and they work great (deliver the peaks and don't shut down thermally).

>Did I just pay 8K for a preamp for just its looks and hype?

This is a huge area of contention between the objectivist and subjectivist camps.

In double-blind comparisons (like those used to test drugs) listeners are often unable to differentiate between very inexpensive and arbitrarily priced competently engineered audio electronics (speakers and turn tables which rely on mechanical components area different story).

Objectivists suggest that's because audible differences don't exist.

Subjectivists say that some how the testing protocol hids those differences.