Who remembers the FULTON cables?

Back when I was a teen starting in this hobby, I remember that there was speaker cable by FULTON that was so thick, people referred to it as "welding" cable. Does anyone know what it sounded like? I would think rolled off with powerful bass. Perhaps diameter-wise, some of today's cable is even thicker.
your speaking about fulton gold 4 ga.cable. before installing is best to place near speaker, and gase at it for a few days. outbursts of grins and giggles are permitted at this time. very few of even todays amps are posted to accomodate the huge ring terminals but more important the enormous stress on the binding post if you have limited space and have to do a ninty degree turn to the post. i made some six inch tails from fulton brown cable which is very flexible and very musical.makes hook-ups less of a nightmare. been awhile since i used my cables, finding the new tech stuff faster and revealing, and can't leave out the all important more expensive. wonder how many feet of gold went to the salvage yard to finance a six-pack or a pack of smokes!
todays cable diameters seem to be all center core and outer housing.
any fultonites out there with tall bob stories im at ralphcreatures@go.com
The legendary fulton gold speaker cables, thick as hell and heavy too. I have a pair of 28 ft of these cables and its weight like 40 lbs.!!! Not very good full range, its strenght is in the bass and the lower bass. I planned to use it in the low of my biamp speakers but it is just to damn thick and I still try to find way to hook up this cables!!!
FULTON- These cables, there were two models, "Brown" and "Gold", were very popular in the late 1970's and early 1980's. As far as I know, they were the first "audiophile" speaker cables, so they actually created this new "component" category. They were never that good and now they are obsolete.

Basically, they were extra thick, copper, lamp cord wire, like standard Monster cable, but with silver plating. The Brown was 12 or 10 gauge, while the (extremely stiff and super thick) Gold, was either 6 or 4 gauge. They had both a high inductance and a bright sound. They did have good bass because of their low resistance, especially the Gold, which is probably still a good choice as a subwoofer cable. Other than that, both cables are now obsolete and should be avoided.
Yes I had them,used them on Acoustat3 speakers, and CJ power amp,I eventually had to snip the ends to make them more conventional, more like spade lugs.

I also remember having to find ways so that their weight didn't take some of my other amps off the rack.

I had a pair of the Brown Fultons as well,which were more manageable.

Sonically,compard to what I've used since,I'd say they were better than zip cord,but I most likely wouldn't be as impressed today as I was then.
Nothing said "audiophile you have arrived", like those old Golds.
One important fact not mentioned above is that Fulton's cables all came in precise lengths which were multiples of 57" (plus a small fraction). This was true of both interconnects and speaker cables. The speaker cables worked out to roughly 14' and 28' and the interconnects were 57". There was a major controversy at the time as to whether the Fulton cables would sound as good if they were a different length. I remember reading in Stereophile many years ago that one Fulton owner had trimmed a foot or so off his Gold speaker cables and reported that they then sounded just like zip cords but with better bass. I never had any Fulton wires in my system due to the cost, but I heard them many times in other systems with Fulton speakers.
Yes! Had them on a set of Beveridge speakers. Very grainy. Cables have come a long way since then.
I believe it is Dennis Fraker of Serious Stereo who also dotes upon the 'correctness' of that 57 1/4" length (or multiples/divisions thereof). I myself can neither confirm nor deny.