Where can I get my Tri-Planar burn in cable cooker

Hi I live in Vancouver Canada , and

I have a new Tri=Planar Tonearm... taking too long to break in,..... anyone know of someone who can burn in faster/ cable cooker or whatever it takes prefferably in Canada, or the USA 2nd choice for customs reasons only.

This is so horrible that you have to burn these connected cables , and it takes so long.
If anyone has any positive ideals.

I would be very much appreciated it.

Here is a easy way, less than $150. And you'll like the improvement.

-Buy a purist audio designs burn in cd.
-Get a RCA or XLR cable (cheapie) plug one end into your CD player. The other end of the cable cut off, go to radio shack and solder on some alligator clips.
-Hook the clips up to the leads exiting the tonearm near the head shell. (DISCONNECT FROM YOUR PHONO CARTRIDGE)
-DISCONNECT the Triplanar phono cable from your phono stage and plug it into a CD or Aux input on your preamp.
(so the signal routing is cd player to cable to alligator clips to tri planar cartridge clips to triplanar tonearm cable to AUX in on your preamp)
-follow the burn in instructions on the purist cd.
-play a few cd's for a few hours this way also.
-plug phono cartridge back in, plug tonearm cable back to phono stage.

Enjoy. There are other ways. This works for me.
wow...never thought of that before!

Thanks for the great suggestion
Somewhat similar to Jfrech's method, I've used a MOBIE to break in tonearm wiring, even daisy chaining two arms together, and offer this service to clients.
This link may be useful:


These are excellent suggestions--but shouldn't manufacturers of tonearm cable burn them in at the factory, especially given how difficult it is to burn them in with normal operation?

This would be good for all cables, actually. Unlike record cleaning, this is something that can be done efficiently at the manufacturer, and given the fanaticism most manufacturers profess about their products, it seems they would want to do this.
The greatest part of cable burn-in relates to dielectric absorption, which will stabilize after so many hours of voltage passing through the conductor. The dielectric will give up this charge over an extended idle time, and the process must be repeated. Given the inevitable time gap between the maker, distributor, retailer and end-user: It would be largely a waste of effort for the process to take place at the point of manufacture.