What is the future of redbook players?

From what I read, modern turntables are not what they were when vinyl was in vogue. Yes, no? How about redbook CD players? Is there anything in the horizon via new technology that will give more from the CD media that currently exists? Or has the height of redbook technology been reached?

If you mean that they are much much better now, esp. when you look at value with inflation factored in, I agree with you. If you could get something like a music hall mmf7 in 1980 for the same relative dollars, people would have found it a lot more painful (literally) to start buying thoses early cd players.

IMHO (as always). Technological progress is first to see what can be done at any price and second to do the same thing at the lowest possible price. I suspect that the first phase is close to its end, and there are some signs that the second phase is starting (e.g. Njoe Tjoeb & others).

As always, random thoughts that are worth as much as you paid for them.
I see TTs, and accessories getting better and better. The same with CD only players. I would assume that in the future there will be more Universal players and less CD only players.

Redbook is dying.
I think that the more interesting question could be posed about the availability of the software. Cassette, 8-track and open reel tape have completely disappeared in the US as consumer media, but LPs are still being pressed over twenty years into the CD era, is it at all likely that CDs of new music will continue to be distributed in the next era, which, it seems likely, will be internet based direct distribution of media?
Very short, at least for the the medium priced units. Low priced units are almost gone from all major brands.
the conventional cd will outlive sacd and dvd audio. ultimately it will be a boutique entity similar to vinyl. most music will flow from the internet and the playback (we are here already) will be the home computer or ipod....the hi end industry shot both its feet off marketing myths and not not facts . its most loyal advocates are quickly growing older and not being replaced with enough new customers to sustain or grow the industry. so much for 'rock and roll will never die'.
Red-Book isnt going anywhere, it is way too popular with main stream population..no way will it die..not for the near, or slight, or far distant future...cmon didnt anyone learn a lesson on longevity from LP'S?