Walker High-Def Links v. Cell Phone EMI-RFI


Has anyone experienced how well the Walker High Definition Links mitigate the effects of EMI-RFI emitted by cell phones?

I was speaking on the cell today near our system and the speakers suddenly emitted a loud pulsating/vibrating sound as I walked in and out of the room.
somut
the bybee products may work for this as well?
Turn off the cell phone.

Problem solved.

No need to spend hundreds of dollars.
Just was wondering because if a cell phone can cause such a loud disturbance, what might a microwave, laundry machine, or television set be doing to distort the signal.
Do you think the cell phone transmission that causes the electronic sound through speakers is in any way similar to any RFI that would be caused by a microwave, laundry machine or TV?
I have no clue on electromagnetism: I'm an English major.
I do have the Walker Ultra Links on my speakers. The speaker cable length is 25 feet from my SET amp tp my horn speakers. I just made a call on my cell phone next to the speakers- no sonic difference while calling. The Walker's did make a significant improvement in the system's sound.
David Pritchard
David, your experiment concludes nothing.

Why?

1) You did not try the experiment with and without the Walker links
connected.

2) You (we) do not know that making a call causes the pulsating sound
described by Somut. I have experienced the sound he is describing, and never
was it the result of making a call on a cell phone. However, the sound was
always caused by a powered-up cell phone sitting idle within about ten feet
from the electronics.

3) From my experience with this phenomenon, proximity to the speakers is
not the cause. Proximity to the electronics is the cause.

I will go out on a limb and venture a guess that in Somut's system, under the
conditions in which the cell phone caused the vibrating sound in his
speakers, the Walker Links would have absolutely no effect in eliminating the
sound.
The sound of cell phone going trough speakers is strictly a 3G network thing. Lots of phones including Blackberry, Treo and iPhone run on this network and when they "check in" with the system there can be a broken buzzing through the speakers.

The problem is not with the speakers nor is it effected by the Walker High-Def links one way or the other. The interference travels in from the front end of the system and moving the phone away from the system (physical distance) is the way to resolve the problem.

If you own a cell phone that does this with your sound system, set your phone beside your computer and your computer speakers will buzz at the same frequency and interval. Although the FCC states that no device may interfere with another, this whole new cell phone network plays havoc with dozens of pieces of electronics, not just high end.
I too noticed that this same phenomenon occurs near our laptop. I initially happened upon this interference in our tube-based amp/preamp system; however, no such interference was an effect in our Threshold-based solid state setup.

Our phones are both Sprint-Nextel. Thanks guys.
I wonder what these signals are doing to our brain cells while holding it against our head for hours at a time. I guess we'll find out in about 20 years.
04-30-09: Albertporter
The sound of cell phone going trough speakers is strictly a 3G network thing.

While it's definitely a cell phone network thing, it's not limited to 3G. I've heard this phenomenon in our home (restricted to the TV) for more than 10 years...long before 3G networks existed in our service area.
albert...that makes sense. when presenting and using a microphone my blackberry causes the microphone to garble when it "checks in". I always have to put it aside or turn it off.
I wonder what these signals are doing to our brain cells while holding it against our head for hours at a time. I guess we'll find out in about 20 years.
Scary thing, I'm afraid 3G is microwave frequencies.

Tvad
While it's definitely a cell phone network thing, it's not limited to 3G. I've heard this phenomenon in our home (restricted to the TV) for more than 10 years...long before 3G networks existed in our service area.

I got my first cell phone in 1985 when they were the size of a suitcase and went in the trunk of your car :^).

I've owned dozens of handheld phones, each in their "popular era" including Motorola, Nokia, Oki, Kenwood, Treo, Samsung, iPhone, etc. I'm not doubting your experience but in our market with Southwest Bell = Cingular= AT&T, this never occurred until the 3G network went up.

I'm not doubting you, it's probably due to the fact I watch so little TV, I never noticed until it impacted my music and computer.
Lokie- If a cellphone can do this for a steak, just think what it will do for your head: (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=przkFZJSkOc&feature=related) Talk about an "upgrade"!
If you think this is a problem through your home system, you ought to hear what it sounds like through a bank of wireless microphone receivers connected to a PA system. Always fun...

-Richard
This is quite a disturbing problem: Yesterday, while receiving a cell call upstairs, the speakers downstairs came to life and emitted that mysterious clicking sound; and this with the amplification off. We use Innersound Eros plugged directly into the wall socket.