VPI Scout- motor pops in speakers when turned off

I just recently purchased a VPI Scout. Whenever I turn the motor off to change records, a loud pop comes through the speakers. I called VPI about this, and was told that it is "system dependent" and not something to worry about. I was told just to turn the volume down before turning it off, which doesn't really satisfy me as a legit answer. I have read on the forums on Audio Asylum that I am not alone with this issue. Is VPI's response just side stepping the issue? Is it really something to worry about? I found it sort of a lame response.
A DIY fix would be to wire a snubber circuit across the on/off switch of the VPI.

Simple, a resistor in series with a capacitor paralleled across the switch's contact.
I have the same thing going on in my Scoutmaster, recall reading about a resistor value change in motor, can't recall the value. I haven't worried much about it as the pop is so low in volume. I also have screech at startup, belt slipping on pulley, any fixes here?
I have exactly the same problem. I believe that there is a snubber circuit there but not a very effective one. I just hit the mute switches on the preamp prior to turn off.As far as the belt screech problem, I solved it by placing the belt in a bag (ziploc) of talcum powder and shaking it.
> Sns

> I also have screech at startup, belt slipping on pulley, any fixes here?

On my P3 to avoid that i just swing gently the platter by hand and switch the motor on. The TT start smoothly without any belt wear.
Usually a 0.01uf 600V cap placed across the power switch terminals is all that is needed to deal with this problem. That cap should not cost more than a dollar... we have them if anyone needs them.
I get this as well on my Scoutmaster. I just turn off my phono pre between record changes to avoid the problem.
I wouldn't use the talc on the belt. Used to be recommended over the years but now they found its a no-no. Eats up the belt.
I had this problem. The fix for my set-up was plugging the motor into a different outlet. I had it plugged into my power conditioner and move it to a wall outlet on the same circuit. I’d try this first as it’s an easy fix if it works.
Atmasphere is spot on with his response. Had the same problem with a HW 19 turntable and that totally solved the problem. Dirt easy to accomplish.
Here we have a typical 'hi-end' approach to customer service, e. g. let the customer take care of the problem via various workarounds. Why VPI cannot ship the units with the problem corrected tells you loads about arrogance. VPI's motor vendor needs to make the fix as otherwise the UL warranty is voided, as it is when the customer makes the fix. I am sure they have a ton of units in the warehouse and don't want to return them for the fix.
I couldn't agree more with your post. They (VPI) KNOW it is an issue. That was obvious when I spoke to them on the phone. I can appreciate the fact that he didn't play dumb and act as if I was the first person they had heard from regarding the issue, but dismissing it as "system dependent" is not acceptable to me either from a manufacturer of high end equipment. I realize the Scout isn't a "high-end" piece in the true sense of the term, but is is the limit of what many hobbyists are willing to spend on a turntable. It is expensive enough that they should deal with a known issue such as this on a product that has been in production as long as the Scout has. It's not like this table is a brand new product.

Oh well, enough of my ranting. It isn't THAT big of a deal. It is just my first nice TT, and I was just a little peeved about this. I am otherwise very happy with the sound of the Scout so far, which is what really matters.

Thank you for all of your responses. I may try installing the capacitor. Sounds like an easy fix for someone with basic soldering skills.
Mekong56 knows that if he does the fix, the warranty is voided. Where in the world is quality, customer service.?
All my years of dealing with VPI I have never had a response such as the one Mekong56 describes here. Not that I am disputing his claim of the incident. But to me this is not like VPI at all. This just doesn't fit the man Harry Weisfield owner of VPI. I have always found him very helpful and spot on with his advice. To be candid I am somewhat shocked by this thread.
To be candid I am somewhat shocked by this thread.
02-07-09: Ferrari

Shocked? By VPI's response? Or shocked by the responses from others that have experienced the same problem?

First off I would agree with with VPI's supposed response to Mekong56. Could very well be..... "system dependent" .....
Shocked by VPI response. I have never had such a response from VPI. I have had same problem over the years with Rega, Oracle and a few others. This is a dirt simple fix if the problem relates to the turntable.
You forget the age we live in.

Come Monday morning I suggest you contact VPI and ask them if they recommend that you, Joe public, install a capacitor across the contact switch of their VPI TT.

JMHO, I would think it could be a liability issue for VPI telling you, Joe public, to do so.....
If the solution is as inexpensive as Ralph suggests (and he's usually spot on) and if the problem is pervasive and not isolated, perhaps VPI should authorize their dealers to make the modification reimbursing them accordingly.

Jea48 That info came directly from Harry at VPI during a phone call to him sometime ago. I did exactly what he said to do and that solved the problem, Took about 40 minutes of time from start to finsih. Most of that in dissasemby and reassemble the turntable. The part was .75 cents.

This is not problematic with all systems, in mine it was and a phone call to Harry solved the problem.

By the way VPI now aswers the phone Tuesday through Thursday.

If you can follow instructions have some knowledge of a soldering iron and have the cap that atamsphere has listed in this thread your set. Also RS sells this cap as well, so you don't need to outsource the part from some esoteric parts catalog.
Wow. This is not where I intended the thread to go.

I will state for the record that they were very nice and courteous when I talked to them on the phone (I didn't get the gentleman's name).

Here is a link to a thread from 2003 on Audio Asylum in which the poster with this very issue claimed that VPI actually offered to swap out the capacitor. That one reason why I was not satisfied with their answer. This, if true, would seem to me to illustrate that it is a known issue that could have been corrected by now.

I agree this problem should have been rectified long ago, makes VPI look rather amateurish. I also think they should rectify the belt screeching problem. I also have an issue with their 10.5i arm upgrade to the Scoutmaster tt. I recieved mine with no template, you would think they would offer a template if they offer the arm upgrade to end users. They should either supply a template or make it a dealer only option. I can imagine a lot of amateurs screwing up the installation of this arm.

Good sounding equipment is not enough, service is just as important.
That info came directly from Harry at VPI during a phone call to him sometime ago. I did exactly what he said to do and that solved the problem, Took about 40 minutes of time from start to finsih. Most of that in dissasemby and reassemble the turntable. The part was .75 cents.
02-07-09: Ferrari

If you had been a first first time caller would Harry have given you the same advice?

By the way VPI now aswers the phone Tuesday through Thursday.
02-07-09: Ferrari
LOL, I think you understood my comment.....


As for those who think VPI should install the capacitor, period....

Well if all audio equipment manufacturers built their equipment with double insulated power wiring then there would be a lot fewer ground loop hum problems.... That is for people who have ground loop problems.

As for VPI installing the .75 Cent part across the switch in every TT they manufacture I am sure they have a reason why they are not doing so. Could be a cost issue but I doubt it, jmho.....

Quote from Link:
"A sudden rise in voltage across the switch contact caused by the contact opening will be tempered by the capacitor's charging action (the capacitor opposing the increase in voltage by drawing current). The resistor limits the amount of current that the capacitor will discharge through the contact when it closes again. If the resistor were not there, the capacitor might actually make the arcing during contact closure worse than the arcing during contact opening without a capacitor! While this addition to the circuit helps mitigate contact arcing, it is not without disadvantage: a prime consideration is the possibility of a failed (shorted) capacitor/resistor combination providing a path for electrons to flow through the circuit at all times, even when the contact is open and current is not desired. The risk of this failure, and the severity of the resulting consequences must be considered against the increased contact wear (and inevitable contact failure) without the snubber circuit."
You are right about arrogance....I've been trying to get my VPI Aries repaired for over a month....The few times I called about it was a study in arrogance.....I won't call again, its not worth trouble.......I'll just buy another kind of turntable....Problem cured
normal VPI operation