Vintage DD turntables. Are we living dangerously?


I have just acquired a 32 year old JVC/Victor TT-101 DD turntable after having its lesser brother, the TT-81 for the last year.
TT-101
This is one of the great DD designs made at a time when the giant Japanese electronics companies like Technics, Denon, JVC/Victor and Pioneer could pour millions of dollars into 'flagship' models to 'enhance' their lower range models which often sold in the millions.
Because of their complexity however.......if they malfunction.....parts are 'unobtanium'....and they often cannot be repaired.
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Vinyl was too cheap in the 70’s ?
Record dealers drilled sleever and cut corners on the sleeves to mark discounted vinyl, but drilling record labels is something strange, maybe not strange for Japanese ? LOL

Why disc stabilizers are not recommended by SAEC for their Mat ?
Disc stabilizers (record weight) were very popular in the 70’s/80’s

Without record weight drilling is the only way to fix the record to the mat to avoid slippery according to SAEC

I prefer weight on top, no drilling for sure.
I thought SAEC provided that metal bridge to fix the mat to the spindle, i was wrong :( 

SAEC also warned up: they do not recommend to use tape, even thin tape under the mat.


That's actually pretty fascinating overall.

However what I find really odd is that over all the years I have been listening to and perusing LPS in stores etc, that I have never seen one single example with a hole drilled in it for this purpose.

Anybody ever seen one that would align with this information?
The SAEC mat is not prone to slipping on the platter surface even without tape and without drilling the LP, but I do use a record weight and will continue to do so. The drilling seems to have been recommended to prevent the LP from moving with respect to the mat. Live and learn.