Vandersteen 2Ci - Bi-wire cable question


This might sound like a stupid question but I'm going to ask anyway. I see lots of bi-wire speaker cables with one pair wire connection to the amp on one side and two pairs (bi-wire) on the other/speaker end. I always questioned the wisdom and wondered how these cables are made. So here's my question: Are there any benefits in "converting" my regular speaker cables into bi-wire by simply splicing two short pairs of  cables, of course same quality as the main cable with connectors on the speaker ends.The speaker in question is Vandersteen 2Ci which doesn't have jumpers. I'm also wondering how folks hook up regular speaker wires to these speakers.

Or, I should also ask if a bi-wire connection mandatory on these speakers? Thanks.

Dfc79476 b7e2 448b 8f7b 3aed2a5e9ad4kalali

I'm sorry I mistakenly wrote "bi-wiring" instead of "bi-amping". I have already "bi-wired" the speakers using a single stereo amp which has two pairs of speaker outputs. I was questioning the vertical "bi-amp" diagram in the manual which goes like this:

Amp # 1 ..................> Left speaker

   Left +/- ....................> mid-tweeter cable

   Right +/- .................> bass cable

---------------------------------------------------------------

Amp # 2 .................> Right speaker

   Right +/- .................> mid-tweeter cable

   Left +/- ...................> bass cable

My confusion is about the bass cable connections which appear to be reversed. Sorry if I'm missing something obvious.

If I recall correctly, Mr. V thinks vertical biamping less satisfactory than horizontal. That is, using one amp (monoblock) per channel, as opposed to splitting the signal.
B
read the really excellent manual inluding the words for step #3

one stereo amp is for left and one for right

gdnrbob
... Mr. V thinks vertical biamping less satisfactory than horizontal. That is, using one amp (monoblock) per channel, as opposed to splitting the signal.
You seem to be confused about biamping. Horizontal biamping means using one stereo amplifier to drive the low frequencies - using one channel per side - and another stereo amp to drive the high frequencies - again, using one channel per side. Using only one monobloc per side is conventional amplification; it's not biamplification.

here is the link to the ps audio explanation of vertical and horizontal bi-amping. http://www.psaudio.com/pauls-posts/bi-amping-horizontal-or-vertical/