VA The Music : Sound vs measurements


In the latest issue of the British hifi publication, HiFi Choice, the Vienna Acoustics The Music had a rave review but the measurements were utterly disappointing - the response was far from flat with a very deep notch around the 2 kHz band. Is it possible to get superb sound from speakers, and I would like to focus only on speakers(not electronics, etc) that measure so badly? I have a personal interest in this as I own a pair of The Music and I know they sound very good but not being able to make my own measurements, I don't know how badly they measure till now. Any thoughts?
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What do the off axis measurements look like?
How about the area just above and just below the notch?
What does the overall octave to octave response (on and off axis) look like?

No one graph tells the whole story. Several speakers that show obvious on-axis anomolies sound very good to my ear - the Verity Parsifal Encore quickly comes to mind.

IOW, trust your ears and don't sweat it, at least AFAIC.

Marty
Marty's advise is spot on, if it sounds good then no worries. Were the measurements of the VA in room or anechoic? I have seen anechoic test of speakers that displayed deep notches but when measured in room the response is smoothed out quite a bit.
Thanks for your responses.
The graph showed on-axis response only and just below and above the notch, the curve is about 5 dB difference. It is not stated whether measurements were made in-room or in an anechoic chamber but the latter would be unlikely.
I fully agree that if the speakers sound good, the measurements don't matter much. We should just enjoy The Music!(pun intended)
why don't you measure your room? you might get even better sound with some treatment after!
Thanks for your responses.
The graph showed on-axis response only and just below and above the notch, the curve is about 5 dB difference. It is not stated whether measurements were made in-room or in an anechoic chamber but the latter would be unlikely.
I fully agree that if the speakers sound good, the measurements don't matter much. We should just enjoy The Music!(pun intended)
Will do, Keithr, when I have the time. Should be interesting.
Another of countless examples that demostrate there`s no substitute for the best acoustic tool we have, yes our wonderful ears.
If all we needed to judge a speaker was the specs, then all we would need to judge a great piece of music would be the written score.

My expereiences over 30 years in this hobby and with all kinds of systems has led me to that conclusion.

Some feel that we shouldn't trust our ears,but they just don't get it.

Plain and simple this whole hobby is nothing but tricks and illusions.

And again harking back to my experiences,the ones that do the best at illusion are the ones I remember the most.

If the illusion tends to mess with the specs but still makes the speaker disappear and the music come thru, then what does that tell you about specs?
..... that specs are always secondary to "our wonderful ears", as so aptly described by Charles1dad.
Those who judge speakers by their specs are not using their ears. If you like the sound of your speakers, don't worry about it.
I presume that's a simulated anechoic on-axis measurement; a single measurement that includes reflections is usually less than useless. At best the on-axis response paints an incomplete picture. And, "on" which axis? Microphone distance and/or height can make a significant difference in the measurement.

It's quite possible that the on-axis dip is just above the crossover frequency. If so, it could be evidence of intelligent juggling of trade-offs. You see, the designer may have compensated for the wider radiation pattern of the tweeter (relative to the midrange, in the crossover region) by introducing a dip at the lower end of the tweeter's passband, which will actually result in more balanced in-room sound.

When working on a design, I take many measurements from different angles and distances, with different types of processing involved, all in the hopes of coming up with a "picture" that correlates with perception. A single curve is extremely unlikely to adequately convey what a loudspeaker is doing.

Imho, of course.

Duke
dealer/manufacturer
Appreciate your input, Duke, from a technical standpoint. It would appear that speaker designers have to address the many design vs. performance compromises when building a speaker for a real listening room in a valiant attempt to re-construct the big picture".