turntable stand, steel, aluminum,shelves of ?


What do you use, cost no object. Steel , Aluminum, sand or lead filled. Your table, sprung or pointed, your arm, cartridge, on a concrete or wood floor.

Did you buy or build. There are many great suppliers of eqipment racks out there. My situation requires a custom design that cannot be satisfyed by a standard supplier. I've spent a good deal of time building my table, the stand might make it or break it. Your thoughts are more valuabe than you might think



I'm a DIY guy, I can mig weld steel or tig weld aluminum. I can fill it with sand or a matrix of urethane and lead.

Guys, I'm 65 and I don't have that much time left for mistakes. I have a sexy wife, three years younger than I, who only uses the music to the means to an end. -----------------

Please reply soon , as Sue tells me we will have a Saturday nite dance fest with Delbedrt Mc Klinton, I may be dead by Sunday.

I appreciate your reply.

Thanks, Ken
kftool
I just happen to own an isolation table that would seem to resemble what you are describing. I used to use it for my own front end and it did a fine job, but I can't say I did any critical comparisons to back up that impression. Regardless, mine is a steel and solid lead isolation table manufactured for use in a physics laboratory. I don't know if they are still around, but the manufacturer was Vibra-Stat I believe. It weighs around 300 lbs I'd guess, and comes apart into to pieces. There are four spring shock absorbers for legs, one in each corner. You can see a not-so-detailed picture of it from my system page here. If you try moving one of these around on your own I don't think you'll be doing much dancing, or anything else fun for that matter. You may even be dead earlier than Sunday. But I can see from your own system page that you are either a glutton for punishment in that regard, or have a bunch of Ooompa Loompas doing your bidding. Steel alone is very resonant, of course, but surrounding solid lead it is dead as Jimmy Hoffa. I'd imagine sand filling would have a similar effect. I've moved out of my studio space, where my old system page is from, and my beluga vibration stand is in storage, and will likely eventually be sold because of WAF which it seems has no bearing in your case. I recently had to move it, and I'll tell you it is not an event that I particularly miss.

Hope you make your Sunday deadline (pun intended...and I certainly hope you are not serious). Oh, and have fun Saturday night!

Marco
Marco,

Thanks for the reply. I'm hoping to get more positive replies from "gonners" regarding steel stands as compared to aluminum. Welding aluminum takes a seasoned craftsman, especially if you have concerns for perfectly smooth joints that can easily be covered with a powder coat finish. Steel is a snap to braze with almost perfect joints that need almost no secondary grinding.

Aluminum is easy and cost effective to extrude. Complex and visually attractive shapes are possible at almost no extra cost, the eye candy factor may eclipse the performance to some degree. I can understand why some manufacturers use aluminum for their stands, especially if they aren't filled with sand etc, since steel does have a more pronounced ring than aluminum

I've noticed that companies that produce stands for vibration control devices all use steel. I guess that performance is the only factor when you put an expensive lab device on a table as compared to a fancy turntable that will sit in your living room.

I plan on coupling the stand to the floor with oversized cones as the stand will support a vibration control platform to reduce vibration from affecting the turntable.

And Marco,I do have some Ooompa Loompas along with a chain hoist and an engine hoist and have, in the past, definitely needed them.

regards, Ken

The best sound I have heard from any of my turntables setups was achieved after placing it on a wall mounted welded steel shelf. You may want to check out Grand Prix Audio Brooklands wall shelf for ideas.
Cinder blocks on top of myrtlewood half-spheres work for me.
I am in the process of making a new equipment stand myself. I weld aluminum and steel. This new rack is steel, 1-1/2 square solid bar stock frame, 6' long, 22 inches wide and 30 incehs high, 3 shelves total. The bar stock is the frame with 1-1/2 baltic birch shelves set in to the frame. I have decided to connect the wood to the steel with solid silicone self leveling rubber sealant, poured between the steel and wood, say 3/8 wide. The rubber will isolate the shelves from the steel and I will shim the stand up and grout it to the concrete floor with 1/2 of non-shrink grout. It will weigh 600 lbs or so in the end. Turntables on soapstone slabs on Aurios bearings on the top shelf, other equipment on the two lower shelves. Have fun with yours. I am digging mine. Welding is good for your head. Lay down that bead.
Guys
I work with aluminum all my life.Glazier by trade on commercial structures.The best connection on alumimum are mechanical.My rack is all alumimum with stainless steel fasteners.Non magnetic design.I am talking about the thin aluminum tubing available at hardware stores,mine is made entirely out of heavy gauge commercial tubing.And yes it is heavy and rigid.
Marco funny as always,thanks for the laughs,bro.
Ken you are one of a kind audiophile,I checked your pics!!keep it up.
George
Guys
I work with aluminum all my life.Glazier by trade on commercial structures.The best connection on alumimum are mechanical.My rack is all alumimum with stainless steel fasteners.Non magnetic design.I am not talking about the thin aluminum tubing available at hardware stores,mine is made entirely out of heavy gauge commercial tubing.And yes it is heavy and rigid.
Marco you are funny as always,thanks for the laughs,bro.
Ken you are one of a kind audiophile,I checked your pics!!keep it up.
George
Tarsando,

I bought 12--- 8 x 8 x 16 solid cinder blocks a few months ago, dried them out in my oven at work. 3 blocks per level, 2 side by side and the third sideways. each level separated by a piece of half inch of Homasote with the stacking configuration staggerd, stacked 4 levels high. The cost, maybe $60 bucks. The Sota Mellinium, Tri Plainer MK VII, Shelter 90 X sounded great for 10 minutes until I realized that I had the arm set up incorrectly. Before that , I think that concrete is as good as you can get if you can get if you can get past the look.

On another note; In 1956, I met an audiophile, his name was Joe Cortese. He bought 2 Stevens 15 inch full range speakers from the company I worked for. The company was B.S.Wisniewski in Milwaukee ; Auto parts, appliances, TV's, Stereo equiptment. We sold Marantz, JBL, Sony Superscope, Garrard, Miracord, and a few of the Icons of the early high end when nobody knew what hi Fi was. I bought a Marantz model one audio consolette and model 2 amp. I was 15 years old. Joe came in and told me he poured concrete corner enclosures for his Stevens drivers. I thought he was nuts, now I know he was way ahead of his time.

A good friend of mine from our audio group who can afford the MOST EXPENSIVE gear available has said, over and over, that the best doesn't have to be the most expensive. I think we both agree .

I appreciate your down to earth reply, not everyone needs to be crazy, rich , or foolish.

Regards, Ken
G M C,

There are those who make stands from steel and aluminum, thin wall, fancy shape. Why , because everything that gets shipped is priced on density and volume. They say, fill it with sand, check the density of sand and steel., quite a difference but sand is $3 at home depot for 100 lbs. Solid steel or aluminum rings if you hit it with a hammer, I don't think that I ever went around hitting support stands when the music is playing. It's all about business and the economics of shipping something that is great eye candy, you take care of the details. I think you are on the mark with what you are building for yourself, I may need to rethink my plans for the stand I am building.

GMC , I sincerely thank you for your posting, I may just use solid steel for the shelves. In fact , I think I will, I'll send you a cd of the stand and table I am assembling. Please email me an address.

regards, Ken
Hals Den.

My walls are acoustically treated with panels from Acoustics First. There is no way I can hang anything heavier than a painting, so I am relagated to floor standing devices. I 've heard good things about wall mounted stands as long as the wall isn't built the way houses are built today.

Thanks for the reply.
G M C. I got your email, If my reply didn't get thru, I feel I can help you with a better material than what you plan to use. My business is Polyester/ Epoxy/ urethane and silicone resins and elastomers. There are better options than those available to you. Email or respond on this posting before you go any further with the silicone material you plan to use.

regards, Ken