Turntable cones/spikes or shock absorbing feet?


How about both?

I've dorked around with my turntable (SL1210) feet various ways over the two years. Recently I tried something that turned into a real keeper:

I had been using the Parts-Express solid brass Dayton speaker cones as the threads fit the Technics. They were seated directly on a butcher block turntable and were noticeably better than what I'd had before.

What I tried was taking a set of "floor savers"--those flat metal discs with an indentation in the center for protecting floors and shelves from spikes--and placing the cone points on the floor savers, and placed the floor savers on top of a set of weight-matched Vibrapods.

Voila! This made everything better--no tradeoffs. Lower noise floor, better imaging, better dynamics at both ends, better inner detail.

The problem is that it's hard to come across floor savers of sufficient diameter to perch on the suspension doughnut of the Vibrapod.

But there's another way: Herbie's (maker of the Way Excellent TT mats) makes these cone/spike grounding bases, which combine floor savers of various sizes with an underlayer of his dBNeutralizer(tm) pad.

The Vibrapod website also mentions this type of arrangement, but as I said, the challenge is finding a floorsaver big enough to use with Vibrpods.
johnnyb53
This might be a matter of taste. I have always loved sprung tables, LOVED them. They seem to have more depth, more imaging, more reality, to ME. By putting rubber under yours you have kind of taken a step in that direction. So I'm with you on that.

There are others, from what I've read in various forums, who vastly prefer solid "suspension" under turntables. I think they feel the sound is more precise and focused. I don't get it, but that's life I guess.
04-28-09: Artmaltman
This might be a matter of taste. I have always loved sprung tables, LOVED them. They seem to have more depth, more imaging, more reality, to ME. By putting rubber under yours you have kind of taken a step in that direction.
No doubt there are different tastes in turntable playback. In my case, I want to retain the speed precision and unwavering torque of a direct drive, but introduce some of that relaxed presentation so characteristic of suspended designs.

So my suggestion may be better for a direct drive like the Technics and maybe other unsuspended designs. Many users equivocate over whether to get the springy Isonoe footers from KABUSA or the Threaded Heavyfeet from Mapleshade. Both or direct screw-in replacements on the Technics. I think the best may be a third way--get the brass heavyfeet to transfer internal vibrations out of the motor/plinth area into the feet, but put the feet on an energy-absorbing polymer to help dissipate the transferred vibrations. That way you keep the slam and bass clarity that cones give you with a lighter, airier presentation than all hard parts.
Sorry to bump my own thread, but has anyone here used the Soundcare SuperSpikes? For an audiophile product, the baseline product is reasonable ($67.50 for a set of four). You can get a self-adhesive model to go under components, or threaded versions in M6 or M8, or 1/4" or 5/16" threads. Those thread sizes fit most speakers that are supplied with threaded spikes, and M6 is a drop-in replacement for Technics SL12x0 feet. A nice alternative to the more expensive Isonoe Footers or Mapleshade Threaded Heavyfeet.

They are very widely and positively reviewed. The design uses a hardened steel spike clad in a vibration damping zinc foot, terminated in a spike point that goes into a steel receiver, all encased in a scratch-resistant plastic foot. Rated up to about 880 lbs. so I guess they could even be used on Wilsons.

So this strikes me as a bit of a hybrid, and could be made into more of one with a Vibrapod or Foculpod under each foot.
The only problem with the soundcare superspikes for the Technics is the fact that the base of the Technics table flexes where the M6 screw goes in, so you need a spike with a larger diameter or you need to shim with washers to make a base.

Unfortunately I have no experience with the Soundcare product but have also been interested in it because of the lower cost.
05-16-09: Cytocycle
Unfortunately I have no experience with the Soundcare product but have also been interested in it because of the lower cost.
I have an audio buddy who installed some SuperSpikes on his SL1210 M5G. I'll write him and ask what he thinks of them.
Johnyb53 wrote "Sound isolation tip from a dance club DJ installer " on 07-10-08.
http://forum.audiogon.com/cgi-bin/fr.pl?eanlg&1215744749&read&3&4&
I use a modified version in that I use gel wrist pads ALONG with the original leveling feet on my turntable. This has worked out incredibly well. Rock solid platform with excellent sound.
I use gel wrist pads ALONG with the original leveling feet on my turntable.
Where have you positioned the gel wrist pads?
4 racquetballs and 4 caster cups. Place the racquetballs in the caster cups. Unscrew the 4 stock feet from the Technics. Situate the caster cups / racquetballs on the tabletop / shelf / whatever so that the Technics rests on the caster cup / racquetballs in place of the stock feet. This combo provides some of the benefits of a sprung design with the virtues mass and damping inherent in the Technics. Its cheap - much cheaper than Ginko Clouds - and pretty darn effective. I found some nice looking wooden caster cups with rubber on the bottom that make a very nice overall presentation as well.
Johnb53,

Gel wrist pads under each of the four turntable feet.
Thanks for the tip.

Regards.
I ordered http://www.oregondv.com/15spike.htm spikes from Oregondv . com, they custom did some 2.15" spikes in black chrome for for my Salamander Berlin Rack which have worked wonders... Very attractive.. I ordered the 1.5" M6 threaded in black chrome for my Technics.. I'll use the washer method underneath to level the spikes correctly and provide better mounting. 4 - 3/4" 2 1/4 diameter 1/8" washers to prevent foot swaying or or fender washers 2" with 1/4" whole in center (based on threads I researched) and this will be on top of a 1" acrylic support which I might float on Aurio Pro Max's if I don't get the results I'm looking for.

My friend uses the larger Mapleshade brass footers M6 threaded into a 3 or 4" Maple plank on top of the Mapleshade Isoblocks. the improvement was dramatic compared to the stock footers.
It all depends on the table/setup. With a Rega, I found that great benefit can be had by using inverted cones under the surround. With my VPI Superscoutmaster Ref. rim drive, I find that using maple butcher block is the best thing to use. Experimentation will reveal it all.
I would think it would depend on the TT.

When I had my Micro Seiki BL-91 I used Audioquest sorbothane feet. The TT had no suspension or isolation. Sounded better with the feet.

When I had my VPI HW-19 Mk4 with SAMA motor I used spikes on the TT and sorbothane for the motor, to stop motor vibration. Sounded better with tweaks.

With my current Basis I use Sobothane for the shelf, but nothing under the TT.

I think am going to get a TT shelf from HTS but I want to try it first, it may not make much of a difference with my setup. Everthing in my system besides amps and speakers are in a closet on the other side of one of the houses main carrying beams so don't get much if any vibration or feedback from the speakers.