The very best sound: Direct to Disc


Since I got a new cartridge (Clear Audio Virtuoso) i’ve rediscovered the Sheffield and RR Direct Disc albums in my collection.  
Wow! they put everything else to shame.  I picked up about twenty Sheffield D2D’s when Tower Records went out of business for a song (no pun intended.) I’m just now listening to them and find there’s nothing that sonically compares.  They’re just more real sounding than anything else.  Not spectacular but realistic.   
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Eric - do you have that Crystal Clear Charlie Musselwhite?????

@bdp
Hey @tomic601, good one! That I filed Musselwhite's d-2-d LP (Times Are Gettin' Tougher Than Tough) not in my "audiophile" section, but rather in with the "normal" LP's, proves that I value it not just for sound but for music as well. I found a copy up here in Vancouver for ten bucks, but it's not the cleanest copy. I guess the previous owner wasn't an audiophile. ;-)
One of my favorite records to listen to is: Les Brown and his band of renown Goes Direct To Disc. It was manufactured in West Germany and the label is Century Records. It says limited edition.

I was also wondering if anybody else finds 45 RPM albums to be too noisy?
One of my favorite records to listen to is: Les Brown and his band

Yes I do
excellent also Harry James and his big band-The king James version...very live
I was also wondering if anybody else finds 45 RPM albums to be too noisy?

i’d say you have to be more specific about 45rpm albums. and not all turntables are created equal.

i likely own 95-99% of all the 45rpm albums out there (1500+) produced in the last 25 years, as well as most from earlier eras, and they are very quiet as a group. OTOH since the record is traveling at a higher speed, the lead-in grooves and between cuts will have slightly more ’noise’. but the signal to noise ratio of the musical data is better than 33rpm since there is ’more’ data. the noise recedes farther into the background, more detail and nuance emerges, and more music comes out.

but if your turntable is not quiet (more rumble and flutter or actual motor noise) at 45rpm, which some are not, then, of course, that is what you will hear. obviously the better turntables will be quieter at the higher speed.

and........if you are referring to the 70’s and 80’s 12" singles and ’dance’ re-mix 45’s, those are a crap shoot as the quality is all over the board. many are a mess and noisy. they were generally not mastered and pressed with great care. a few though, are very quiet.