The most erotic passages in classical music

Wagner has written the overture to Tannhäuser with a sensuous, sensual, erotic connotation in mind. Ravel's Bolero, parts of Berlioz' Symphonie Fantastique are downright sexual. But I don't want this to be the point here. What I'm after are "erotic passages", which are full of senuality and would induce images in kind, or a feeling in kind or a yearning in the listener. I also wonder, if there are any gender differences in what music is deemed erotic. Erotic, nota bene, not sexual!
Scriabin: Poem of Ecstasy. Listen to the trumpet line.


during the time Bach was married to his second wife,Anna Magnelena, before he moved to Liepzig,were the happiest years of his life. In an age where marriages were arranged,he had married for love. These following pieces of music demonstrate an erotic quality,at least they do to me:The slow movent of the 5th Brandenburg Concerto
The two part inventions-think69
The violin concerti,in particular the d minor concerto for two violins with emphasis on the middle movement.
Mozart the slow movements of piano concertos 20,21,23,and 27.
chopin the nocturnes many of the nocturnes were written on commissions from women. don't play them too loud,if they are loud enough to wake someone,you're going against the point of the esthetic.

Hope you and your friend(s) like these'
Will, interesting! If you consider the circumstances of the creation of this piece, you may well be right. Only I find sensuousness and erotic longing rather in the cantilena and in the wonderful dialogue between flutes, woodwinds and the strings. The trumpet lines I find a tad to selfassertive to be truly erotic. Its not surprising, that they go under in that fantastic finale, which to me is orgastic and purely sexual (rather more female than of the of male sort, if you know what I mean. )Thanks for reminding me Will, of this fascinating music. I have it on a Phillips LP with Eliahu Inbal and (grin) his Frankforters.

Pragmatist, I have the d minor (with the two Oistrakhs) resounding in my head. How very right you are. Also about the Mozart. I find your idea about the two part inventions most intreaging. I'll go and listen to them right now. Never thought of it that way, seems obvious though. And yes, the Nocturnes, thought of them, when I started this thread.
Thankyou p. Wonderful! Detlof

Pragmatist, I'm back now. That was a stroke of genius. I dug out a 1960 version on DG with Ralph Kirkpatrick, wished I would have found the one with Wanda Landowska. The scope of attraction, repulsion, of approaching and drifting away from each other, of rhythmic union and the tension, when each part drifts syncopatically apart only to intertwine again was indeed EROS in its truest sense. In fact, it reminded me of the language of the Alchemists, who were still flourishing when Bach was at Koethen and who desribed what they percieved in their retorts and ovens in a beautiful erotic language. Thanks p. You've opened doors and made my evening!
Many of the passages in The Ring when it is a male/female theme or duet - when Wotan is singing farewell to Brunhilde, after he has stripped her of her powers, and placed her in the magic fire, for example.
Ivanj, could not agree more! You can think of Wagner whatever you like, but he was masterful without compare in putting eros to music. The Ring, as you so rightly say, abounds with it in all possible shades and variations, from the first blossomings of love to crudest sexuality.
The fifth.
amendment, obviously, hehheh!
For me, it would be the Carmina Burana by Carl Orff. Especially the "Omnia Sol Temperat" (The sun warms everything) performed by Fischer-Dieskau under the direction of Eugen Jochum.

Thanks Yul and how lusty that is! I must dig it up again.
I cited an example, you provided the understanding. Vielen danke!
Ivanj, Danke DIR! I was also thinking of the scene, when Siegmund meets Sieglinde, in the second part of the Ring, after his rush through the forest, and the two become attracted to each other. The sweetness of the music there, in contrast to the opening overture, which mimics the pounding of his feet and heart, is incomparable. Wagner was a fiendishly clever dramatist and he knew more about human nature than any shrink or psychologist around.
I think you guys need to get laid more often.Sex is great,but music far surpasses sex,which is a base emotion and a release.Now being in love, elevates it to something almost metaphysical,and that is something far,far different.After 4 million years of development all we can still think about is coitus.
The lead in groove! No, the lead out groove! No, wait, the lead in groove, or the lead out, in, out, in, out, in, out, in.................;^)
Mingus and Ramstl seem a tad one track minded. They obviously missed the point, that his thread is not about sex, but about music. Aw well....coitus, like beauty is obviously in the eye or mind of the beholder.
Yul: I agree with Carmina Burana, but for me it would be "In Trutina", especially as sung by Evelyn Mendac on the Ozawa performance. Listen to the luscious way she sings "lascivos amor". I've heard a number of others sing it, but not as well.

Incidentally, I also agree with The Poem of Ecstasy.
Dacostab, thanks for taking up this thread again and for mentioning EM. I think you have a very good point there. Haven't listen to that performance for a long time. Shall do so tonight. Cheers,
Detlof-I take it from your statement (coitus, in the eye of the beholder) you're a "lights on" kinda guy? Well who'da thunk!! :-)
Mes, LOL, how did you guess?! ...and with mirrors all around and on the ceiling of course!! Sort of like suround sound, no?
Surround sound? One can only hope!
True, Mes, but where's hope, there is a way! Besides thanks also for your response, 'cause I wasn't sure if its suRound or suRRound. Now I know. Cheers, D.
I'm surprised that no one has yet nominated the second movement of Rodgrigo's Concierto De Aranjuez for "Truly Erotic" status.

Kindly, everyone, go back to your collection, do listen, and give your opinion of agreeing or disagreeting with my assertion.
I have always thought of Aranjuez as romantic rather than erotic.