The Audio Expert??


Anyone reading Ethan Winer's "The Audio Expert?"

http://www.ethanwiner.com/book.htm

After a very brief scanning, I think it'll be a useful resource.
bob_reynolds
Ethan Winer brings allot of common sense to many myths that permeate the hobby.
I am always amused when someone refers to theirself as an expert.
Rrog wrote,

"I am always amused when someone refers to theirself as an expert."

I can abide with himself, herself, one's self, even themself if I 'm feeling lackadaisical, but theirself I cannot abide.
Rrog: +1
"theirself" notwithstanding :-)
I am always amused when someone refers to one's self as an expert.
I don't see the author declaring himself an expert. It appears, at first glance that the author has compiled the working knowledge of many experts into one book; a comprehensive reference book about audio. The field of audio ranging from recording music to listening to it is certainly much too complex for a single person to master in a lifetime. For example, I might consider myself an expert on my own home audio system that I have developed and refined over the years and yet someone could walk in and in 5 minutes take it to a whole new level for me. (just sayin') So maybe we should just consider ourselves masters of our own domain and leave it at that.
A very humble assessment Tony. I applaud you for that.
Tonywinsc wrote:

"So maybe we should just consider ourselves masters of our own domain and leave it at that."

Well Tony may be the master of his domain but I am married.

I am and expert on that.
"masters of our own domain"
Wasn't there a Seinfeld about that????
I didn't mean it that way... :o
08-03-13: Tonywinsc
I don't see the author declaring himself an expert. It appears, at first glance that the author has compiled the working knowledge of many experts into one book;
I'm not sure where you got this from. The blurb on the website just says he wrote a book and it came out great. He named his book The Audio Expert.
I'm not suggesting he is or isn't, or that he should have or shouldn't have, but he declared himself the audio expert.
Seems similar to guys who open their own martial arts dojo and proclaim themselves 10th degree grandmasters of the art they invented after secret revelations.

In the end - trust your own ears.
Isn't it the book itself that is the
"Audio Expert"

I would rather listen to music or read about artists than look at a text book.
You know, an "expert" is someone who learns more and more about less and less until they finally know everything about nothing.
Forget Ethen Winer.

Spend your time listening to gear not in search of some guru, especially someone like Ethen, that believes, except for speakers, basically all gear sounds the same. That's utter rubbish and poppycock as you will find if you listen to gear through some reasonably transparent systems.

Check this review out:
http://www.stereomojo.com/LENEHAN%20ML1%20REFERENCE%20SPEAKER%20REVIEW/LenehandML1ReferenceSpeaker.htm

Two entirely different views of speakers with spectacularly good measurements. Which one is correct. The answer is both are - but only you can decide which group you fall into by listening yourself. No shortcut - no Ethen Winer to fall back on - only you can do it.

Thanks
Bill
I have Mr. Winer's book and have read (most of) it. The title notwithstanding, I have a difficult time getting past his assertions that cables and gear should all sound basically the same. I think (know?) our human hearing is more sensitive than any modern test instruments and I think (know?) we can hear stuff that simply cannot (yet?) be measured. And since it cannot be measured, it cannot be quantified, and Mr. Winer does not like that and doesn't seem to be willing to give credit to our abilities outside the realm of hard science as it currently stands. And until it can be measured and quantified, I am perfectly comfortable hearing subtle differences that Mr. Winer suggests are all in my head and will just have to be satisfied with feeling insulted with his position on this until technology progresses to the point that it can be measured. I don't think this is a likelihood in our lifetime, but I'm optimistic for future audiophiles.
Imagine a dating service that provided just height, weight and age of dating candidates. Not too many people would be keen to sign up for a date based on measurements alone. A whole lot of subjective input is needed before making a decision. Pretty much the same for a stereo system. Some numbers might provide a starting point for selecting gear but numbers are far from the whole subjective picture. Numbers will never provide the whole picture simply because people hear and respond to sound differently. Just listen to your stereo sometime with all of the lights on and then all of the lights off in the room. Both scenarios create a totally different mood.

btw- nice to hear from someone who has actually read the book.