Subwoofer Choice

I'm considering adding a moderately sized sub to my system and was looking at the REL R-305 or possibly Velodyne DD-10. Has anyone had enough experience with these to comment on which would be more musical for a music only system? Thank you.
Digital Drive (Velodyne DD) series are just fantastic. I run a DD-18, which I upgraded from a DD-12 only because I got one of those 'too good to pass up deals' on it. But the smaller one was too, absolutely amazing. The EQ function works and works well to make the sub compliment mostly any room and system. I've found them to add so much to my speakers it was like I upgraded the speakers too! You must give them a listen in your environment set-up if you can. You'll be convinced.
Go with the Velodyne.
I think you could be happy with either or disappointed with either. It's all a matter of setup. My preference would be the Velodyne with its PEQ system.
Thanks everyone. I have three questions though.

1. Is the high pass filter of good quality in the Velodyne?

2. Can the Velodyne be hooked up in the same way as the REL by running speaker level signal from the amp to the sub?

3. Of the options offered by the Velodyne, which way would you recommend connecting for blending well with Harbeth M30's which extend to about 50Hz?
1. Is the high pass filter of good quality in the Velodyne?

It will be orders of magnitude better than the speakers you'll be connecting to it, but it'll also be the first device to get blamed for a poor setup. You can always buy an NHT X2 filter if you believe the internal filter is poor.

Even as good as Velodyne subs are, I wouldn't mate a 10" model with Harbeth 30s. The 12" would be as small as I would consider and I'd take the 15" if budget can be managed.

2. Can the Velodyne be hooked up in the same way as the REL by running speaker level signal from the amp to the sub?

Yes. All direct drive models have speaker level connections.

3. Of the options offered by the Velodyne, which way would you recommend connecting for blending well with Harbeth M30's which extend to about 50Hz?

High-pass no question. Regardless of the M30s specs, I doubt you'll get 50Hz out of them unless you get them close to a wall, which you do not want to do. The big downside to the internal high-pass filter is that it's a first order design. So, an audible portion of a 40Hz signal will still be sent to the M30s. Of course, if you go speaker level connections, then all of a 40Hz signal will be sent to the M30s.

The critical aspect of setup is placement and level matching. The Velodyne's PEQ will help with any placement issues, but level matching has to be done with test tones and an SPL meter.
Thank you Bob. Can you explain why the 10" sub would not be appropriate with the Harbeth M30's? My room is only 10'X14' with a ceiling height of about 7'. Or is it unrelated to room size?
I think your Harbeth M30s are some of the finest speakers made, so you really want to lessen the chances of the sub detracting from the sound. My thinking is that the larger subs will not have to work as hard, thus producing a cleaner less distorted sound. Ideally, you should not be aware of the sub being in the system until you turn it off.

Velodyne has a link on their web site that will suggest subs based on room volume. You might email them and ask if a larger sub would be a better fit than the DD-10.
Dear Bcollins: IMHO, the first and more important/critical subject on the addition of subwoofers in any audio system ( for music ) is to try to understand which are the different audio areas where subwoofers could help our audio system to improve its whole quality sound reproduction.

Here you can read something about that can help you:

I agree with other people in favor of velodyne.

Regards and enjoy the music.

I have a DD-10 and really like it. My room is a bit smaller
than yours (10x10) and the DD-10 is more than enough.I think
Bob makes some good points. My one concern would be that
the DD-12 could be too much for the room. My friend had
a DD-10 and then upgraded to the DD-12. The difference was
not subtle. Yes the DD-12 is better but it might also be
harder to integrate into a smaller room. Your best bet would
be to demo them both and see which one works best.

Good luck
Thanks Bob.
IMHO, a Harbeth will mate better sonically with a REL. I will even suggest you get two RELs (one for each channel) simply because the H30 does not go down low enough for you to be unable to detect the sub. If you can only get one sub try placing it in the centre between the speakers a few feet from the front wall but behind the speakers (place until it seemless i.e does not draw attention to itself). I am suggesting this only because you don't want the sub to give away its location. If this does not bother you then by all means place them on either side of the speakers.
Do remember that a sub will change how the Harbeth sounds so be gentle with volume. Begin by setting the XO point at around 60Hz and you should be OK.

As for the Velodyne, you may find the built in software useful if you have space constraints. If your speakers are really a good distance from the walls e.g Cardas placement method or 1/3 placement rule, there is very little use for the software.
I would point out that regardless of the method of speaker placement the Velodyne software is still very helpful in sub placement, crossover point, level matching regardless of whichever sub you chose. Velodyne also markets this system as a stand alone and typically sells for about $400 used.

In a recent review of the JL Audio sub the reviewer used his Velodyne software to setup and provide a visual of the JL's own setup software. Rives Audio sub-PARC crossover manages these parameters in the analog domain.

Is the Velodyne software compatible with Macintosh computers, or only Windows based systems?

Also, I read somewhere that the newest version of the Velodyne software does not permit crossovers lower than 40Hz. Is this true?
Rel is generally considered to be better subs for 2 channel with its ability to blend seamless and dissapear. Velodyne makes excellent subs and the digital correction is a great feature but sub for sub I would go for Rel. I have heard a moderately priced and sized B series (forgot wich one) that was amazing. I ended up buying a Martin Logan Descent and will probably add an sms-1 someday.
The Velodyne software is embedded in the device. The stand alone product is called the SMS-1. It provides a video output and its own user interface. So, no PC is required.
Does a separate device come with the subwoofer? Or is it built into the sub? When I checked Velodyne's web site, the instructions for downloading software updates referenced the need for a windows based computer. I wouldn't be purchasing the stand alone devise.
The Velodyne DD subs mate with any speaker and do it much better than REL. The room correction system Velodyne uses is state of the art and leaves the competetion in the dust.