Shunyata Power Conditioner advice


I have noticed that a number of well respected reviewers have Shunyata Power Conditioners in their reference systems. The reviews are quite glowing. In some cases the reviewers list two seperate conditioners within their systems; I assume one for amplification and one for source components. In Robert Harley's case, for example, he lists both the Hydra V-Ray v2 and the Hydra 8 v2. My question is this, "would you use the higher quality V-Ray for source or amplification?" My assumption is that you would use it for source?
tmhouse0313
I would always use the superior product for the source. Whatever qualities the source presents will be further amplified down the chain. Kind of like what Ivor T. thought about turntables.
Hi, I'm using the Shunyata cords and vray. I'd put the best you can on the source end.

I like my amps using Shunyata cord right to the wall-seem to have better dynamics, although seems like the amps are more quiet via the vray
Thanks, makes perfect sense
If one has higher current capabilities, I would use it for the amp.
I use a Hydra 2 on a dedicated line for the amp, and a Hydra 8 on another dedicated line for everything else.

I've tried running with just one and always found that this configuration works best in my system.
Why not get an Audience Adept Response and plug everything into it including amps?It is non current limiting and will do your whole system.
Just a correction and note. Yes, Audience conditioners are non-current limiting,This means that they don't actively alter or impede continuous or instantaneous current. Shunyata Research and several others products are no different in this way. However, _any_ added AC junction does passively resist instantaneous current to some degree. Some amps are more sensitive to this than others.

Some types of amps are particularly sensitive to any added AC contact resistance because they draw so hard off the AC line. Adding any in-line connections will add some resistance to AC delivery in the same way that applying AC adaptors to a power cord would.

In some systems, the benefit of lower noise from a passive filter-device outweighs the slight losses incurred by the added resistance in front of amps. for others, not. Its not that passive conditioners do anything to slow current, but the fact that you have added connections in front of high-draw amps can have some effect.

Taking advantage of more than one dedicated AC line when they are available is important to the performance of two-channel audio. Those with a second dedicated line have essentially double the available current for an electronics system. This is best put to use by isolating the high-current electronics on one AC line and low-current on a second line.

Some make the mistake of buying a multi-outlet power distributor thinking because its passive, that they can remove amps from their own dedicated line and plug them into the same shared line with all the other electronics. The results are predictably negative because they have just halved the total amount of available current and co-mingled high and low current electronics together on a single AC line vs two.

I hope this helps,

Grant
Shunyata Research
Grant:

Will using two dedicated lines invite hum through a feedback loop? I recall reading an old white paper by Nelson Pass that discouraged using more than one AC line.

I'm waiting for delivery of McIntosh C2300 preamp to feed a McIntosh MC352 amp, using your balanced interconnects. Perhaps the balancing act will diminish hum?

Thanks, Sheldan
I've just introduced another dedicated line to my system for the digital gear.

That's three dedicated lines, and no hum issues.
If anything, less noise.

If someone claims that adding dedicated lines created hum or noise, then perhaps it's a bad electrical connection at the panel,the lines are not all on the same side or phase of the panel or that some noise inducing appliance such as the funace AC or refrigerator share close proximity with one or all of the dedicated lines at the panel.

Have an electrician come over and see if he can balance out the amount of draw each half of the panel has.

In my case, the AC is on the other side of my panel, and so are some other things,even so, my sound is better when I turn off the AC breakers in the fall.

Dedicated lines in conjunction with upgraded power cords and conditioning( I use Shunyata, but have no affiliation, so don't call me a shill)have made quite the improvement in my system, and when you can make improvements to what you've already invested in makes more sense than to jump on the merry go round looking for the perfect sound.

The perfect sound might already be in your system but you just haven't heard it yet.

Give your gear good power and you'll be quite pleasantly surprised.
Lacee:

I'll check this out:

"If someone claims that adding dedicated lines created hum or noise, then perhaps it's a bad electrical connection at the panel,the lines are not all on the same side or phase of the panel or that some noise inducing appliance such as the funace AC or refrigerator share close proximity with one or all of the dedicated lines at the panel.

Have an electrician come over and see if he can balance out the amount of draw each half of the panel has."

Since I did all wiring in our house, including panel connections, I'm the one to blame if my two dedicated lines are out of phase!

Hello Tarjin, please feel free to e-mail us with questions. I don't look in here often enough due to work and travel to be consistent in reply.

The primary cause of hum related to the use of dedicated lines is a difference in potential to ground caused by running differing lengths of wire from panel to outlet. If your furthest outlet requires a 25 foot run of wire from the panel, you need to use this length for any additional dedicated lines even if they are much closer to your AC panel. Make sure the gauge and breaker are rated the same and if possible on the same electrical phase. This will minimize the likelihood of ground-loop related hum.

Best regards,

Grant
Shunyata Research
I recently got (2) Shunyata Hydra 4. It is my understanding that each set of ports are isolated from each other. I have the following items connected. To the first unit, first set of ports are the PSU's from two HDD and the second set have the Dish Network satellite box and my HDTV. On the second Hydra one set of ports are connected to my Mac Mini and my DAC. The second set of ports are connected to my amp and my REL sub.

Does this connection scheme seem reasonable or would you connect with another combination and why?
Mwheelerk,
I have a Hydra 4, FWIW. To answer your question(s), as I understand it from users of more than one Shunyata conditioner the idea is to separate the analog from the digital equipment. Your set up sounds close but still mixes amp./sub. (assumed analog) with digital Mac/DAC.
Ultimately, you may not actually hear a difference, but this is the theory. Other factors that will influence your outcome are the type (and brand) of power cords you use. From my experience upgrading power cords on the Hydra 4 has always been noticable. For your future info, the folks at Shunyata (Customer Service) are very approachable with concerns such as yours. Likely it is not the first such question on best usage of this type.