RMAF Etiquette


I have only attended RMAF once in 2014, however, I found it very difficult to evaluate systems due to background noise. The majority of times I would try and listen to a room I found the vendor speaking loudly to attendees/friends. I understand the need to speak to somehow because this is a social gathering of sorts, however, i found it very difficult to hear the equipment. I cannot be the only person that has experienced this problem. My hope is that people may read this and think before they start a conversation in a listening room at RMAF. I am very hopeful to find some new loudspeakers this year and be able to do so in in relative silence.
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I have attended each year and I agree. There are certain rooms where they have closed demos and every one is quiet, but then the rooms get crowded and hot. I have determined that it is a place to see and hear the equipment but not make a buying decision. 

My only suggestion is if you are really interested ask the vendor if you can make an appointment at closing time, I did that a few years back and it was nice, and I was able to really determine that the speakers weren't for me.
Scheduling a session late is a good idea.  Maybe people don't attend RMAF to buy products as much as they are there to socialize.  I just found it very odd that the majority of people would speak loudly during auditions of equipment.  I found it incredibly distracting to the point of annoyance.  It reminds me of going to a movie and people talking.  

Maybe i am in the minority but if I was shelling out thousands of dollars as a vendor my goal would be to have my equipment shown in the best light and make some sales to pay for my expenses to attend RMAF.  
I agree, it is rude and inconsiderate at minimum. But where do you go these days and not find rude, inconsiderate and disrespectful people? I know that is a blanket assessment and I apologize to those whom take offense. I don't want to turn this in EtiquetteGon, but I do share your sentiment. It's an AUDIO show and the gear should be heard. But as mentioned I go every year and it seems to be a gathering of friends as well and that part invites the talking, laughter etc. Obviously the vendor could control it by telling people to be quiet, but they can't risk offending potential customers, dealers or prospective dealers.
Either way I always enjoy the show, I just wish it was a different venue than the DenTech Marriott. Parking and elevator accommodations are much less than favorable.
An audio show isn't a place for serious listening any more than an auto show is a place to test drive a car.  It's a meet and greet, industry and friends event intended to showcase product.  It's really about manufacturers and distributor/dealers with the public there to help defray the costs.  Use it to narrow down what you want to seriously listen to at a dealer.
I have used RMAF to narrow the search, however, many of the products I like are not sold in Colorado so I cannot go listen to them at a local showroom.  My only opportunity is at the show.  

Since this industry is apparently struggling I would think vendors would want to create the best possible environment to highlight their products and sell them at the show.  
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The sad reality of every audio show I’ve exhibited at is that putting on a worthwhile demo is extremely challenging due to the noise bleeding through from the hallways.

Exhibitors for the most part leave their doors open to welcome attendees (and to not collapse from the heat).

Couple this with the bad show citizens (exhibitors) who seem compelled to partake in volume wars and we have a recipe for disaster.

An after hours demo is your best chance, but realize that exhibiting is a physically demanding experience and many exhibitors need a break after show hours. Additionally, they likely schedule off hours to network and collaborate.

The noise floor is one reason I stopped exhibiting. I now have more time to network at the show.

Onhwy61 said it best:

An audio show isn’t a place for serious listening any more than an auto show is a place to test drive a car. It’s a meet and greet, industry and friends event intended to showcase product. It’s really about manufacturers and distributor/dealers with the public there to help defray the costs. Use it to narrow down what you want to seriously listen to at a dealer.

Cheers,
Thom @ Galibier Design
If you need more than one minute under just about any conditions to initially evaluate the sound of the system - it is no good for you. No, not a place for critical listening, but as others have said that's not the goal of the shows. Just like a great live performance - people can talk or scream, and it will be distractive, but you will know that the performance is great.
"Either way I always enjoy the show, I just wish it was a different venue than the DenTech Marriott. Parking and elevator accommodations are much less than favorable."
This year  DenTech Marriott will be the big issue as they have not completed the renovations in time.