redneck iPod in-car connection

My wife and I use an iPod quite often in our 2004 Sequoia for music, but our only option is via the tape deck.

Any ideas on how to connect from the 30-pin to the tape?
Your best bet is to get an adapter that plugs your ipod into the cd changer input on the car's cd deck. The first "cd" in the changer lets you control your music with the ipod. The next five "cds" play your playlists in alphabetical order. Will cost you $50+ if you buy on ebay. This will keep your ipod charged as well.

Your car deck may also have an aux RCA input that you can simply plug in a cable with an RCA stereo plug on one end and a mini plug on the other, and then play through the AUX input on your deck. This will not charge your ipod.

The third option is a FM transmitter that you play through the radio. That is the worst sounding option.

Good luck.
Pcking - Can you give me a link to the CD changer input that you're talking about?

I'm trying to avoid using the mini-plug/headphone jack output and instead use the 30-pin dock connector.

So far my redneck solution would be a 30-pin to RCA cable into a RCA to mini-plug adapter into a double female mini-plug adapter into the mini-plug to tape adapter. I doubt the sound difference would be worth all of the cables and adapters sitting in the truck. Maybe I wouldn't hear any difference at all.

Almost as much as the potential for better quality, I hate having the volume on the iPod in the loop.
Why not look at getting a new radio ?
I did actually stop by Car Toys a few months ago and because of the way the factory system is installed they basically told me to upgrade the speakers or nothing at all. The stereo is so integrated that they would basically have to rewire the entire truck for any changes.
So far my redneck solution would be a 30-pin to RCA cable into a RCA to mini-plug adapter into a double female mini-plug adapter into the mini-plug to tape adapter. I doubt the sound difference would be worth all of the cables and adapters sitting in the truck. Maybe I wouldn't hear any difference at all.

Save yourself the trouble. Sounded like a good idea at the time, but I already tried it. The output overloads the cassette adaptor such that audio is very distorted like full blast distorted. And, of course, being that it is a direct line output, there is no volume (gain) control. It seems cassette needs a lot lower signal than line out levels.
You're better off acquring an aftermarket solution that feeds into the decks auxiliary section as others have mentioned.
You can get goid results with a $30 wireless FM modulator from Amazon. I got one for a friend, it allows any FM channel you wish with 3 memory presets and has its on volume control. You cant pick 2 small channels but it plugs into lighter in car then RCA mini into phone or pod. It works very well. Made by Monster.
How about this:

Which you can also get on ebay:

or can try this if you want to save some $$:

I have used the Grom units with great success. Just make sure you get the ones with ipod connectors.
If your car has a tape it is time for a new car or at least a radio with an iPod input. I got one last year for 169 and it did Bluetooth for the cell phone as well best money I spent.
Toyota's decks are awful. They sound veiled, closed in, muffled, and on and on. I own a Highlander and my wife owns a Corolla.

I bought an Alpine deck and iPod cable for my Highlander for about $200 or so and haven't looked back. Still have the stock speakers and have pretty good sound, so that tells me it's the head unit.

The Alpine deck was by far the best $200 I've put into the car. Crutchfield is pretty good with supplying instructions, adaptors, and so on. Makes it idiot proof. I've bought from them several times in the past. They have an 800 number to call if you're stuck, although I haven't used that due to the simplicity of their instructions.

I've had the Alpine for about 6 years without a hiccup. My brother went through a ton of different decks in his car until he got one. He's been very happy with one for about 8 years now.

If $200 is more than you thought you should spend, save up a bit longer for it. Trust me, it's easily worth it.

Sorry if I sound like an Alpine salesman. Just a happy customer. I know a lot of people with them, and none have ever had a problem.
Also, with Alpine decks, more expensive models pretty much only have more features. Most of them are useless unless you're connecting amps. Cheaper sounds the same if you're doing a simple swap of your factory deck and nothing else.

The iPod is controlled through the deck, not the iPod itself, much like a CD changer would bd controlled.
Kbarkamian - I have the premium JBL head unit. Car Toys told me that it was too integrated into the rest of the electronics to replace without rewiring the entire truck. For the money I was willing to spend they suggested either just upgrading the speakers or leaving things alone. I tend to trust people that essentially tell me to keep my money.
Didn't realize you had the JBL deck/system. Haven't heard it, so I take my bashing back.

Crutchfield has something they state can be plugged into most factory systems. Maybe give them a call? They're pretty good about that stuff. They're not like the Best Buy clowns who make it up as they go, as they'll call the manufacturer if they don't know the answer exactly. They did this when I was asking about a Sonos system a while back.
This is a piece of cake in my F-150 with Sync, but honestly, the CD player still sounds much, much better.
This morning I had an iPod integration unit installed in my 2004 Toyota Sequoia with the premium JBL sound system. The mobil tech came to the house and attempted to install a unit that would allow some iPod control through the head unit, but he couldn't get it to work. It appears that even though the head unit has a plug for an auxiliary CD changer there isn't any switch mechanism built in to any of the button to activate it. I've heard that this head unit is a difficult mess and I'm wondering if it's one of those features that Toyota has built in for manufacturing purposes that isn't actually functional on my head unit.

In the end, he installed a unit that connects into the FM antenna and seems to sound just fine. Since it's hard wired it shouldn't have the same types of interference issues that the cheap-o ones do. The final bill was $120 and now we have a much cleaner connection compared to the tape adapter and the iPod gets charged when connected.