Phono preamp to amp question


I own a Eastern Electric minimax phono stage. It has no volume control and I plan on using it as my only preamp .I used a Nad c352 with it in the past using the rcas to bypass the preamp in the nad integrated. I will be using this in a 90% vinyl only system Is it possible to use anything other than a integrated amp since I have no other preamp for volume control? I would like to use a tube integrated but is it possible to bypass the built in preamp on a tube integrated and use my eastern electric as the phono stage without having to use or install driver tubes into the integrated amp. Can I bypass the driver tubes on a tube integrated?
davidnboone
There must be a few tube integrateds that will let you bypass the preamp and go directly to the power amp, but I know only one: the Audio Space AS-3i which I happen to own. Unlikely it will work without the driver tubes though.

But if you have no volume control on your phono stage, why would you want to run it directly into the amp? Are you planning to throw blankets over the speakers when it gets too loud?
The Rouge Audio Tempest II can be configured to run as an amp only but I'm having a hard time understanding what you're wanting to accomplish. You need some kind of volume control.Maybe you can explain a bit better what it is you're after?

So you are wondering if you can just plug your phono stage into one of the inputs in an integrated amplifier? I would think so, just don't plug it into the phono input then you will have a double RIAA curve!
I just want to try tubes but see no use in burning extra tubes when I have a phonostage that needs no additional preamplification. I am pretty sure that crosses out using tubes for my power/integrated amp. As Tobias said "There must be a few tube integrateds that will let you bypass the preamp and go directly to the power amp, but I know only one".
Now My cheap nad 352 let me do this without using its built in preamp. However if I wanted to do this with tubes it would require tubes in the integrateds driver tube section burning for no reason correct??? This being as my eastern electric has enough gain without any more preamplification. Tobias said " Unlikely it will work without the driver tubes "The prior Nad amp I used I connected directly to the audio outs and bypassed its preamp for a cleaner sound. So basically I am required to use a tube amps driver tubes which will alter the sound of my phonostage. I would rather have just one stage as preamp. Is see no need to run through 2 different preamps prior to amplification.
So the driver tubes on any power or integrated must always be running to receive the phonostages signal? Correct or incorrect statement?
Tobias said

" But if you have no volume control on your phono stage, why would you want to run it directly into the amp? Are you planning to throw blankets over the speakers when it gets too loud?"

Tobias as I stated originally you can use an integrated to turn the volume up and down if it has volume control.
I will try to simplify this..
I would like to have a tube amp integrated that has inputs to act just as a power amp, bypassing the integrated preamp entirely. I could just buy a tube power amp but would have no volume controls to raise /lower volume. I can see getting the integrated but don't want to waste money burning driver tubes if unnecessary. Are the driver tubes working/glowing on an integrated tube amp even if the integrated preamp is not in use. Does the signal have to go through the driver stage regardless is what I guess I should know?
LT-30 to TTVJ Hybrid phono to Kramer SE-55 switcher to Sophia Baby amp w/volume control to Kirksaeter 220 speakers. That's my simple analog setup.
David, it is still not clear how you plan on controlling the volume if you bypass the integrated amps pre-amp section. My integrated amp has this feature and it is called a home theater bypass and is a line-level input that requires volume control from another pre-amp or else it is always wide-open. I would recommend either getting a pre-amp and compatible power amp or just a good integrated amp and use as originally designed.
I could raise my volume on my nad 352 when it wasn't going through the nads preamp-( or
) when it was going through the preamp. I preferred the sound from the eastern electric phonostage without running it through the preamp and only using the audio outs and bypassing the nads preamp. It was connected to the audio out I believe. It still raised or lowered the volume even though it didn't go through the nad preamp. I guess it has enough gain that I really don't need a second run through a preamp.
Is there something that says a phono stage preamp has to be hooked up to another preamp to produce decent sound. I was quite happy with the nad 352,minimax, and magnepans. It sounded great with no preamp besides the phonostage in the mix.
If your phono stage doesn't have a volume control and you go directly from that into an amp then the amp will be playing at max output because you don't have anything attenuating the signal coming from your phono.

If you are talking about going from your minimax into an integrated input and then line level out to an amp (hooked to speakers) then you are effectively using the integrated as the pre-amp while not using the integrated amp's drive unit. This can be done but I would not take out the drive tubes unless I confirmed with the manufacturer that it would do no harm. What you need is a pre-amp.
Get a passive preamp to control the volume on the phono preamp. There are plenty inexpensive ones that will do that for you. Check out Richard Lee audio,I use one to control the volume on my tuner.
I forgot to mention,make sure your phono preamp puts out a few volts so it can drive your amp.

This is why God put dealers on this planet. So they could resolve these most difficult problems..
There are Eastern Electric phono stages that have a volume control, it appears. You need to clarify if yours does, and if that will be used to control the volume.

There are integrated amps that have (preamp/amp) jumpers that you can remove to separate the power and and preamp sections.

If you obtain one that has this jumper (preamp/amp) removal
feature, the tubes in any part of that integrated will still run. If you remove those preamp tubes, it can throw all the voltages on the other parts off. That includes all the other tubes, and parts. This can cause damage if you try removing these tubes out of the circuit. It depends on the design some, but is way too risky to do away with them.

So yes, those extra tubes need to stay in there and do run. Filaments stay on, and other voltages will be in these unused tubes. They will sit there, and not bother anything else. This can not be done away with, unless you are a skilled amp designer.

A solid state amp will still have its transistors running in them, even if not used, the same as tube amps.

With this said, people that run amps that have tubes in them that they don't need, put a low priced tube in their place. That way you won't wear out expensive tubes in the amp, you won't be using, but do stay running.

If you choose an integrated that does have the feature, make sure the volume is controlled somewhere. And again, you do need to leave all the other tubes in it. They will run, and sort of be idling, but still running while in the with the rest of the tubes in the amp.
"There must be a few tube integrateds that will let you bypass the preamp and go directly to the power amp, but I know only one". Now My cheap nad 352 let me do this without using its built in preamp. However if I wanted to do this with tubes it would require tubes in the integrateds driver tube section burning for no reason correct???
Davidnboone
The transistors and other parts were still running the full time, just as a tube amp does. There just may be no sound signal going through them. In a lot of these amps by design, other parts share the same power supply. And, making any changes like (removing tubes) that can throw the whole amp out of spec. This may or may not cause problems at first, but may cause the other parts to have too much voltage going to them. The result, costly repairs possibly if you try to remove any unused tubes. Again, too risky.
Thanks for the great info friends