Peter Lederman in Second Bout With COVID-19


I saw on Facebook late last night that Mike Fremer told one of his Audio Friends that he heard from Peter Lederman of Soundsmith that he is suffering his second round with COVID.  Peter said he has blood clots on his lungs. That is all the post said.  Here is hoping that Peter pulls through with a full recovery. 
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My best wishes to Peter for a speedy recovery. 
That's not good. Get well, Peter!
He’s in the age range where he should have been vaccinated at least a month or more ago. Furthermore, second infections are typically less severe than primary infections, so I wonder what is really going on. Anyway I also wish him well, he is a vital part of our hobby. And a nice guy too.
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a good man, please pray for his full recovery. As shall I


Prayers are with Peter and all the SoundSmith family
peter is getting up there in age... hope he recovers quickly and without lasting damage

great guy and a real asset to all analog fans
One of the good guys for sure...get well soon Peter. 
A Peter quote that should resonate with many of us:
"Service is a great way to learn engineering because when you study the forensics of failure, you become a clever engineer."
Send this to him.Latest is that it reduces the recovery time by 400%.
4 shots over 30 days does the trick so its reported. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leronlimab
Hope he recovers quickly and fully. He is an asset to the audio community.
This is really troubling news. I hope he recovers. Good luck, Peter!
He is unfortunately a very high risk individual. This is fall out from his physical condition, an important message for those of you who do not take care of themselves. I'm not sure how NY is handling it but in NH he would have been about 6 weeks ago. 

Hang in there Peter, I'm not hearing of anything that is not manageable yet. Pulmonary emboli are usually not fatal unless they are miss diagnosed. That is how my mother died. She was told she had a cold three separate occasions. 
Wishing Peter a very speedy recovery!
A great asset to the community.
"Latest is that it reduces the recovery time by 400%."

Something is wrong with this calculation.

Fingers crossed for Mr. Lederman.
Prayers for his recovery.
He's an innovative genius and a great guy!
Wishing Peter a speedy recovery! 
Best wishes for Mr. Lederman on a quick and complete recovery. 
Best wishes To Peter!  Great Guy - stay strong.  
I met Peter on one occasion to discuss a rebuild of an amp.  He was very busy as well as very polite.

There is one male person I know that suffered through two bouts of Covid and his blood type is AB.  There have been some reports that blood type
is a marker as to the severity of the infection and the ease of becoming infected. https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20210303/why-blood-type-may-matter-for-covid-infection

Peter is only the second person in my small circle that "caught" it twice.

Get well Peter we are all pulling for you.

Regards,
barts  

+1 from a UK-based customer and fan.
The pulmonary "emboli" of COVID are not really embolic in the true sense of the word; they are small clots that form in situ in the small vessels and capillaries of the lung, because the endothelial cells of those vessels bear ACE2 receptors that permit virus to directly infect them. This releases local clotting factors that promote the formation of the small clots or microthrombi in the tiny vessels that serve the alveoli or air sacs. Thus those air sacs may be functionally OK but they get no blood supply to pick up oxygen. These clots are very slow to resolve during recovery, which takes months, if indeed they ever go away completely.  I gather Peter is not in hospital (because he was able to respond to someone here) and is not requiring supplemental oxygen (because if he were, he would be in hospital), both of which are good things in his favor. However, if he knows he has clots in his lungs, he may well have a slightly reduced arterial oxygen or at least the characteristic confirmatory chest x-ray findings, which is best if it does not get worse.
I still wonder why he was not vaccinated at least a month or more ago. Maybe because with a prior history of COVID, he felt he did not need vaccination.  Actually, immunity due to vaccination with either of the RNA vaccines is probably superior to natural infection in providing protection against clinical illness.
Leronlimab, the monoclonal antibody recommended above, is probably worthless for COVID, certainly worthless for a person who already has significant pulmonary involvement. It was developed for HIV, which uses the CCR5 receptor.

Being an elderly male with Type A blood constitutes a risk group for severe disease per se.  Don't know about Type AB.
Well, he's not in hospital. So that's gotta be good news.
From all the above hard to know if Peter is or isn't in the hospital currently. Hopefully he's at home recovering and in good spirits.
Wishing him a speedy and full recovery.
@lewm , keeping up on it! Several small quips. I have one older woman S/P hospitalization for Covid on supplemental O2 at home. I have seen several large pulmonary emboli resorb completely over the years. These micro emboli should resorb completely. I do not think you can see them on a CXR or even a CT. We know they are there because we see them at autopsy. It is unknown what happens with healing because we do not do posts on living people. Eventually we will know for sure. I am also not convinced that the vaccine gives better immunity than the disease. That would fly in the face of just about every other viral disease we developed vaccines for. Keep in mind the pharmaceutical industry controls the media. What do you think all those wasted dollars on commercials is about.  Young people may actually be better off getting the disease. There are many antigens on the surface of that virus. This is nature's way of training good immune systems for the next sars virus that comes along. Also keep in mind that this disease is extremely minor in most people. People who have gotten both the flu and covid will tell you almost universally that the flu is worse. This is not to belittle the seriousness of this disease in the elderly, seriously obese people, and diabetics. 
One other small point. I have had over 200 patients with Covid and two people expire. I have not had anyone get the disease twice, this is more than likely a delayed response to the initial infection or a miss diagnosis somewhere down the line. The tests we have been using are not the most accurate. Many false positives.
Another wishing Peter a quick and full recovery. We need his expertise in the audio world.
I just chatted with a cart tech/builder who works at Soundsmith. He said it isn’t good. He has actually taken a second job right now because the company is simply in bad shape overall without Peter there. As a small company, I can see that happening.
Mijo, Just to be clear and as I said the first time, I was not talking about "emboli"; I was talking about "microthrombi", tiny clots that occlude the capillaries that run in the alveolar septal walls and which are needed for oxygenation of blood. Those microthrombi are caused by direct virus infection of the endothelial cell lining of the capillary. Injured cells then release clotting factors locally, resulting in clot formation. This process is rather unique to COVID.  The mode of death in COVID very often involves the generation of these microthrombi on a massive scale throughout the lung, such that the patient does not have the alveolar perfusion necessary to maintain life off a ventilator.  Patients with COVID can certainly have classical pulmonary emboli, as well.

Like you, I also am not "convinced" that the (RNA) vaccines give more solid or longer lasting immunity to disease; I tried to convey the possibility that that "may" prove to be the case. Seasonal coronaviruses do not induce lifelong immunity to seasonal coronavirus diseases, and so it is possible that persons with COVID will not be protected lifelong from COVID. (Note, I am talking about clinical illness, not infection per se.) If the RNA vaccines induce effective memory responses, it is at least possible that long term protection will be as good as or better than natural infection in protecting from future disease. However, there is no way to know at this time. In 5 years, we will know. The reasons I say what I said about the RNA vaccines vs naturally acquired infection are complex, would take a couple of paragraphs to explain.

I do agree it seems that getting COVID twice (over the short history of the disease) is at least very rare. That’s why I wrote earlier that we probably don’t have all the facts straight regarding Peter L. Also, every documented second illness due to COVID that has been reported in the literature was LESS severe than the original disease in that person, except for one report that I can recall. So if PL is having his second illness, and if it’s worse than his first, he is in a very rare category for sure. There is a better chance that we don’t know all the facts.
@lewm

The tech I have chatted with is basically the only builder besides Peter himself. He knows what is going on, believe me. I didn’t feel the need to pry any future than my initial concern, and if he could verify the reports.

Peter has been in the hospital for a week now, but he did state, ‘he would be fine’. Hopefully that is the case, but because of how Peter operates his company, any significant time out of the office/shop can create issues. They only have a handful of employees, and business-wise, Peter ‘wears most all the hats’. That is the case of many small companies as Soundsmith. I’ve worked in a few small Architectural firms, and if the principle was be gone for any significant time unexpectedly, it can create issues vs them being there.

Lets just pray Peter recovers fully again, and can get Soundsmith to full operation sooner than later. But his absence seems to be taking a toll, and did earlier. Remember, Peter’s own hand is involved in building most of the highest end products himself. At least that is my understanding.
Peter Ledermann is a living example of the old art of craftsmanship. Skills that were passed down father to son, or to apprentices, we may now lose altogether if we lose Peter. Let's hope he pulls through- and recovers and gets busy training others to carry on with the craft.
My Straingauge is currently winging it's way across the Atlantic to NYC for stylii replacements/energiser upgrade.
Peter gets my full patience.
All the best to Peter.  You are in the thoughts of many more than you can even imagine.  Get well soon.
Hope he is ok and can pull through all of that.
Thoughts, prayers and good vibes to Peter.
Peter is a class-act human being and his goodness goes well beyond this industry.  I wish him well, a speedy recovery, and a long & healthy life ahead.
Wow. About 6 weeks ago, I received my Beogram 4002 (of which I am the original owner) from Soundsmith, to whom I had sent it to for restoration. As part of this process, Soundsmith could have easily sold me a new cartridge, or charged me for rebuilding the existing cartridge, and I would have accepted and paid for this. But instead, they did neither. The extensive and professional service report included the following:
" ... original MMC20CL cartridge evaluated by Peter Lindermann, 40% usable for additional 500 hours. ..."
We need more like him and his company. I am hoping for the best, which, as far as I am concerned, is what he deserves.
@lewm, of course I knw you are talking about microthrombi. My guess is quite a few people are getting these at a lower rate but have recovered. The cases that expire were worse. Do microthrombi have the same composition as larger thrombi? If they do than they certainly will be resorbed. Until we start posting people who had severe covid but recovered we will not know for sure what happens after.

@bkeske, medical issues have a habit of getting twisted around even in the first person. Sometimes it is the doctors fault. They will frequently give a very shorthand explanation of what is going on and get miss understood. I usually do not get the full story until I get the notes from the hospital. Even then sometimes I remain confused. Hospital care has taken a dive since the recruitment of hospitalists. The job of a hospitalist is to make money for the corporation. In metropolitan areas primary care physicians got locked out of hospitals. The way they did it was in order to get inpatient privileges you had to have at least 20 inpatient cases a year. Very few of us have that many inpatient cases on a yearly basis. Many primary care physicians are happy with this as hospitals can be a PITA.
You make more money with less work staying in your office. The loser is as always the Patient. Medicine has become industrialized and impersonal. It's job is making money and not getting sued. Having been personally involved with "the best" hospitals in Boston on multiple occasions recently. I have had surgery 5 times in the last 2 years and each one was followed by complications, one a serious and iatrogenic osteomyelitis of my left clavicle which required 6 weeks of IV antibiotics and a bone graft from my right hip followed by an ilioinguinal neuropathy and a huge hematoma. I have fully recovered but am left with two steel plates and sixteen screws in my shoulder. 
"Hospital care has taken a dive since the recruitment of hospitalists."

"You make more money with less work staying in your office. The loser is as always the Patient."

How would the patient in the hospital benefit from the doctor who can see her/him once a day and who otherwise has to take care of a stream of patients coming to her/his office in a different location? How does such a doctor focus on the patient in the hospital?

Again, fingers crossed for Mr. Soundsmith. It is hard to find a person so universally liked and appreciated.
@rsf507

As of yesterday he was still in the hospital, and has been there for for a week now.
@mijostyn

The tech/builder/employee has given no detail about Peter’s condition, only that ‘it isn’t good’, and also, ‘he will be fine’. Again, I did not pry for detail, but just wanted to confirm the ‘reports’ out there, particularly from Michael Fremer. He didn’t seem aware that the information was ‘out there’ at all.

But, per all his accounts of working with Peter and at Soundsmith, he in intimately involved in the business overall, and Peter as well. That’s all. I’m not trying to give ‘first hand knowledge’ of what Peter’s condition is nor the details of it, but simply tried to confirm the general reports.
I guess this is all pure speculation, until the man himself informs us of his circumstances. He did take part in the thread highlighting the Covid-related issues that Soundsmith were contending with last Summer.
It'll be hugely reassuring if Peter recovers sufficiently to do the same this time around.
@bkeske, medical issues have a habit of getting twisted around even in the first person. Sometimes it is the doctors fault. They will frequently give a very shorthand explanation of what is going on and get miss understood. I usually do not get the full story until I get the notes from the hospital. Even then sometimes I remain confused.

Hospital care has taken a dive since the recruitment of hospitalists. The job of a hospitalist is to make money for the corporation. In metropolitan areas primary care physicians got locked out of hospitals.

The way they did it was in order to get inpatient privileges you had to have at least 20 inpatient cases a year. Very few of us have that many inpatient cases on a yearly basis. Many primary care physicians are happy with this as hospitals can be a PITA.You make more money with less work staying in your office.

The loser is as always the Patient. Medicine has become industrialized and impersonal. It's job is making money and not getting sued. Having been personally involved with "the best" hospitals in Boston on multiple occasions recently. I have had surgery 5 times in the last 2 years and each one was followed by complications, one a serious and iatrogenic osteomyelitis of my left clavicle which required 6 weeks of IV antibiotics and a bone graft from my right hip followed by an ilioinguinal neuropathy and a huge hematoma. I have fully recovered but am left with two steel plates and sixteen screws in my shoulder.

Yikes! So you have seen up close and personal what I have been talking about for some time now. I was there too last year and saw it myself.

Even after I got out and recovered and had enough energy to go back and try and let them know what happened, my "Patient Advocate" turned out to be a total corporate lackey, they flat out lied about things I know happened and it developed into a situation where I had to either give up or try and push a major federal case. Got a good life ahead of me, not about to devote it to trying to fix our broken health care system!  

It is well and truly broken. So broken that when I hear Peter is in hospital my first thought is not gee I hope whatever he has doesn't kill him, it's gee I hope "health care" doesn't kill him! I remember as a little kid the general attitude among people my parents age was oh no the hospital, is where people go to die! Medicine then made tremendous progress, thanks to science, only to swing back to the dark ages, thanks to financialization. 

The sooner he can get out of there the better. Godspeed.

"The sooner he can get out of there the better."

It took 13 lines to come up with this conclusion?
So I have been following this stock for over a year now..
It is actually gaining traction hurt by terrible PR..
There was a similar super positive account in Britain and now from the Philippines..Peter's Docs should investigate this..Please.

https://seekingalpha.com/news/3679216-cytodyn-updates-on-leronlimab-treated-covid-19-patient