No sound coming from spekaers - turntable?


Okay, if you've seen my previous question, I'm aware I sound like an idiot here, but I figured the belt thing out. apparently I had to leave it on the platter and not the turntable itself.

Anyway, I've come across another problem. The platter spins, I can hear the cartridge tracking the record, all cartridge wires are connected and in the correct spots, I've set the tracking force/alignment to an approximately accurate value (without the help of a gauge, which might have been the source of the problem, but I doubt it).

All cables from the turntable to the amp (which is a NAD C315BEE integrated amp) are connected.

All cables from the amp to the speakers (Wharfedale Diamond 10.1). Unless I'm missing something and the speakers have a hidden power button, everything is fine.

Except...no sound is coming out of the speakers. None at all. I can hear the tracking sound coming from the turntable itself, but nothing else.

Help?
toxicwaterfront
I checked the specifications for your amplifier. It only has line level inputs. Are you connecting the turntable to one of those? From your post that seems like what you are doing.

That will not work. You need to use a phono preamplifer with a turntable. Because your amplifer does not have one built in you need to use an external one.
The NAD C315BEE does NOT have a built-in phono stage! You will need to get a standalone phono stage.

I looked at the NAD website and it says the C315 is line level only.

That's the problem.
Your Turntable has a built in phono stage used to increase the low signal from the cartridge.

"The DP-300F includes a built-in phono equalizer to connect the player to an integrated amp or receiver that does not have its own phono input."
You say all cables from turntable to amp, is it an integrated amp? Do you have a phono preamp? Cartridge voltage needs a lot of gain and usually a phono preamp supplies this.
I do not believe your NAD integrated has a phono input. If this is the case you will need an external phono preamp. What cartridge are you using? Different types of cartridges will have different requirements for the phono preamp. The cartridge output, even from MM cartridges which are usually the highest at approximately 5 millivolts, will not work on most preamp or integrated amp inputs that are designed for 1 to 2 volts.
Your integrated does not have a phono stage (aka phono pre-amp) built in. As Uru975 says, the phono cart output (typically btween 0.1 and 5 millivolts) is much lower than line stage voltage (say from a cd player or tuner, typically about 1 - 2 volts) so it needs additional amplification (or gain) but it also needs equalization or modification of the frequency characteristics due to some engineering tricks performed during recording of LPs to improve performance due to some limitations of the medium. This is called the RIAA equalization, so even if you had enough gain, the sound would not be natural or satisfying.
The output from an external phono stage can be fed to any of the line level inputs on the intergated amp, regardless of how it's labeled. However, you should hear "something" if turn the volume way up. If you don't check to make sure that you have not engaged the tape monitor circuit (if there is one). If not, something else is wrong. BTW, a stand alone phono stage can be purchased new for as little as about $100. for used, look under pre-amps and then phono on Audiogon. You've not told us if you have a MM, MI, or MC cart. Low and perhaps moderate output MC (moving coil) carts require even more amplification than MI, MM or High Output MC carts and some pre-amps are built for them and have an MM/MC switch. You'll need to match that properly. What cart do you have?
Okay, thank you guys! I figured it out.
My Denon turntable does have a built in phono pre-amp, but it was turned off.
Now that I've turned it on, sound IS coming from the speakers, but at a low volume even with the volume up "high." I think that has to do with the fact that I haven't placed my speakers properly (just left them on opposite sides of the room).
Hmm, it's weird. I placed the speakers according to my manual, but the volume is still low. It's not like before, where I couldn't hear anything, since I can clearly hear the music, it's just at a very low volume (with the volume knob on my amp turned up to the highest possible value).

Do you think this is related to the fact that my room is full of...things? I placed the speakers > 2 feet from a wall and >3 feet from a corner, but that isn't necessarily saying there's 2 feet of free space between the speakers and the wall. I have boxes and drawers, etc.

Another thing is that I'm leaving the speakers on the tile floor, without any stands whatsoever. The volume issue is still there even when I sit on the floor, level with the speakers. Would buying stands fix this issue?

Again, thanks in advance.
I tried a different record on it, just to see if this specific album (which I may or may not have slightly damaged while getting my stuff set up yesterday) is faulty. Same problem.

I even put my ear right on the speakers to see if the placement was an issue, and the volume coming from the speakers themselves was frustratingly low.

Checked my amp, I'm inputting through the AUX line (again, my built in phono pre-amp is turned on), the lights are all turned on, the connections are all good, etc.
Sorry for the triple post. I'm wondering if my cartridge is the problem. It's a Shure M97XE, brand new.
Make sure your speakers are plugged in.
I do not believe your NAD integrated has a phono input. If this is the case you will need an external phono preamp. What cartridge are you using? Different types of cartridges will have different requirements for the phono preamp. The cartridge output, even from MM cartridges which are usually the highest at approximately 5 millivolts, will not work on most preamp or integrated amp inputs that are designed for 1 to 2 volts.
Do you have a mute button or tape monitor button. If so, push it.
They are.
I am not familiar with the Denon turntable you are using, however, if it does have a built in phono stage, check to see if there is a gain setting, low/high or a DB setting for the gain, in which case you may want to set higher, or, even a boost switch. The gain switch might be labeled with a DB value, perhaps 35,40,45, 50, 55, 65, I really do not know, but you might want to use a higher setting to see if that helps. If you are still hearing noise from the speakers but at a low volume, check the wires on the back of the turntable to see if they are securely plugged in all of the way, also check the headshell wires. Also, not being familiar with the NAD you are using, make sure to check that if an individual setting for each source is not set too low, on many home theater receivers, the volume for each source can be manually set, therefore meaning a source could potentially not be sourced matched with the rest of the components in terms of volume.

Ciao,
Audioquest4life
Do you have a mute switch on your amp? Do you have a tape monitor switch?
fixed. The light was on 'tuner' instead of 'aux.' everything's working properly now, and it sounds amazing :D
Glad to hear you are up and running Toxic. Each of us have had our issues with our gear, and very often you will find that is does turn out to be something quite simple. Enjoy the music!