Need help regarding isolator wiring configuration.


Hello everyone. I just bought and received a Topaz Ultra Isolator. Am I wrong in thinking so or is it already wired for balanced power? It looks odd in both the configuration and using both brown and red wiring jackets (which from what I understand usually are both used for hot wires), and the jumper from the third terminal to the second is odd to me. I'm not really educated enough in this matter to know what's going on here and there's not really a detailed wiring configuration like one seen on other models, only a single picture on the side that I've included.

The unit's input is a 6-20r input plug which needs to be replaced with a 20 amp iec inlet (due to the plugs being reversed on the 6-20r I have no idea if the hot and neutral wiring would be reversed as well compared to a usual 20 amp plug, but I'm assuming not?), and I wish to replace the outlets as well, but I want to make sure of everything before tackling this.

http://https//i.ibb.co/dLcQvbW/DSC06471.jpg

http://https//i.ibb.co/Yfjz3RT/DSC06472.jpg

http://https//i.ibb.co/nP4Yk7X/DSC06473.jpg

http://https//i.ibb.co/QXt2Jv2/DSC06474.jpg

http://https//i.ibb.co/rv4YKsf/DSC06475.jpg
vze2r8xz
I couldn’t get any of your links to work.

As for the 6-20R. The number 6 signifies 250 volt.
Next number is ampere rating, 20 amps.   
R = Receptacle.

I think you might mean 6-20P, inlet plug.
Example:
https://www.westwayelectricsupply.com/wiring-devices/general-purpose/plugs-connectors-inlets-outlets....

Some marketing genius came up with balanced power to help sell conditioners. Its a terrible phrase because we do have balanced connectors in audio and so saying something is balanced immediately makes anyone aware of this think balanced power is similar. Well its similar only in that both create expectations in the imagination that go unfulfilled in the real world.

Speaking of the real world it matters only slightly which part of it you are in. Outlets and voltages vary but in general are the same everywhere: if the plug fits go for it. I travel and have used lots of things in lots of countries with wildly varying voltages and outlets and never the slightest problem.

If you're still concerned about safety well this is the web if I can look up and find what color wire goes on which pin to rewire a USB connector you for sure can find your plug and wire info.

What I would be concerned with is you paid a lot of money for something where even the tiniest details like which plug and how is it connected matter. So rather than swapping plugs or worse using adaptors I would be looking at finding suitable wire that can be used without modification. And I say that being an experienced modder who recommends modding all the time. When it makes sense. DYODD.
Some marketing genius came up with balanced power to help sell conditioners.


Pretty sure it predates audiophile power conditioners becoming a "thing"

Its a terrible phrase because we do have balanced connectors in audio and so saying something is balanced immediately makes anyone aware of this think balanced power is similar.


There are some similarities, like the rejection of common mode noise. That preamp makers make a big deal of being "fully balanced" is not the fault of the tech, but of the hype. 

Personally, if I had the money, I'd run 240V from the entrance to the room, and then use a 2:1 balanced step down transformer.  This gives you an unbroken chain of balanced power, with high CMRR (common-mode rejection ratio) right up to the back of your electrical gear, along with a very low impedance path.  Since 240V transmission takes half the current of 120V, you have less of a voltage drop with long lines. A 10guage cable will seem to have half the impedance.  Though I'm on the fence about having such a great connection to the outside power without additional filtration.
Assuming the OP is correct, the transformer primary winding is fed by 240V. We don’t know if the primary is designed as a dual voltage 120/240V. (Two windings)


The unit’s input is a 6-20r input plug which needs to be replaced with a 20 amp iec inlet (due to the plugs being reversed on the 6-20r I have no idea if the hot and neutral wiring would be reversed as well compared to a usual 20 amp plug, but I’m assuming not?)

No matter how hard you push you will not make a 125V 20 amp 5-20R female cord cap fit a 250V 6-20P panel mount power inlet.
No way in hell.

.

Ok, used a new image host. These are the only three images that really matter.

https://imgur.com/a/kdMt8Rphttps://imgur.com/a/pFAgCYthttps://imgur.com/a/A8IehDJ
If hard wiring a cable in is best then that's fine. I was planning on using the unit with a power regenerator and regulator if possible if that may help or hinder things that would be good to know. I just mistook the inlet plug for a normal 5-20 one in the photos, so I'm trying to make the best of my mistake.
The outlets on the unit are normal 5-20 receptacles.

It did come with a compatible cable, unfortunately it has a male 6-20 plug end as well so a 6-20r to 5-20p adapter cable (https://www.lockingpowercords.com/Products/981-5-20p-to-6-20r.aspx) would need to be used in its' stead. The female end on the cable the unit came with could be removed and put on a cable of my choosing if necessary, but again I have no idea if the pins being a reverse of 5-20 means the hot and neutral would be reversed as well.
It's not that I'm necessarily trying to wire it for balanced power (thought it would be nice if it was), I'm just wondering what the wiring is exactly. I've already looked up the color coding and went to numerous sites and I cannot find a match.

https://imgur.com/a/pFAgCYt
It has a single primary winding and a single secondary winding. (It is not a balanced power output system)


It appears to be wired as an "Isolated Power System". In English the secondary output of the transformer is floating above ground. Both leads, legs, are Hot ungrounded conductors. Neither Hot will have a reference to ground.

Primary voltage input? There should be data printed somewhere on the transformer.
Input voltage
Output voltage
Va rating



https://imgur.com/a/kdMt8Rp
The panel mount inlet looks the same to me.

https://www.westwayelectricsupply.com/wiring-devices/general-purpose/plugs-connectors-inlets-outlets...


@erik_squires 
I like your idea of 240 volts to the entertainment room. 
What filtration do you feel would be ideal for this approach?
Hey @ptss 

It would be worth seeing if EquiTech or another balanced power conditioner provider had a 240V version. A step down transformer and balanced power transformer are identical except for the winding ratio, so it's a natural offering. In addition, those coils will slow down surges and reduce both common mode and differential noise, not to mention eliminate DC. 

Alternatively, use a wall mounted step down transformer, and something like a Furman Elite before your gear.  Furman may also have a 240-> 120V conditioner. 

Best,

Erik
Thank you for the help Jea48.
No there's nothing else printed on the unit save for that picture of the wiring and another sticker with only the model number and Topaz Electronics printed on it. It's the only one of these Ultra Isolators that I've seen that has no real details on it. It also it brand new/unused. Even the model number is something I could not find any info on and Topaz no longer makes these, sends you to another company for info that subsequently sends you to another company down the chain, and there was nothing they have info wise either. The only thing I know is that the inlet plug is 250v 20a, outlets are standard 20a and the weight matches up with 1.8 kva units from Topaz, MGE, and Daitron.The Topaz, MGE, and Daitron units that closest match up with this one are 120/240 input and 120/240 output compatible (all 240 volt units seem to be 120v input and output compatible) so I'm hoping that that means there would be no issues with using 120 input, but again there's no info on the unit at all.
http://www.pacificparts.com/vends/mge/images/t1.pdf
@ vze2r8xz

Because of the 6-20P power inlet my guess is the primary input voltage is 220V
or 240V.
Secondary output voltage is 115V or 120V.

Connecting the primary to 120V will only give you around 60V on the output.
Make sure you check the output voltage with a voltmeter before connecting anything to it.


Thank you for your help. Only way to know is to test now.
@erik_squires. 
Yes, Equitech makes models of 240v. I use a 120 model and wouldn’t be without it. 
Finally checked the unit with a multimeter, and it’s only outputting 65/66 volts to the outlets on the unit when 120 volts is the input. Looks like I bought one of the few pure 240 volt units (all the other units I’ve ever seen that had 240 volt input and output also had 120 volt input and output capability). I had never seen a pure 240 volt one until now, figures. The outlets are 125 volt ones too so it has step down capability on the output.