Music DVD burning question

I recently downloaded a couple of free high res tracks from HDTracks. I burned them to a DVD-R using a free version of Ashampoo 6 Burning Studio. For burning music that could be played on players other than a computer I had one choice: Create a WMA CD/DVD/Blu-ray Disc.

I added the high res files to the list to be burned and it said that the files were WAV files which is what HDTracks said they were. The size of the files on the disc that I burned is the same as the files I downloaded. The disc plays on my Oppo BD-95 and my PS Audio PerfectWave transport and DAC but not other DVD players. The PerfectWave transport gives the correct resolution for the two tracks, 176.4/24 and 192/24.

What kind of disc did I burn? A data DVD, a music DVD, a DVD-A, or what? Is this a good way to collect high res files until I get a server system going or am I ending up with DVD-Rs that aren't full high res?

Thanks for any help.
Since you found that the burned DVD plays on the PS Audio PWT, the disc is in the format of a data DVD. The PWT will not play standard DVD or DVD-A formatted discs, only WAV files burned as a data DVD in the UDF format. Since the PWT indicates the correct bit depth and sampling rates you did indeed burn the files in the proper high resolution format. So now I hope that you can enjoy the tunes in high resolution!
I know I'm going to date myself and sound like a craggy old man but why are we going through so many contortions to listen to music these days? So many acronyms, so many formats. I cannot wrap my feeble brain around the whole computer-generated fiasco any longer. Was it not more fun to put a record on a TT, drop a tonearm, smoke some dope and listen?
Lindisfarne - It was, it is, it will be...'cept I don't smoke that stuff no mo'. 2 out of 3 ain't bad - simpler and still sounding good.
Thanks for the info Bill.

Lindisfarne, it's sad but true, as we age the world gets stranger and harder to understand. The good news is that you can still play Lps and probably get better weed now.