Movies/TV Shows Look like Video

In certain newer HDTV's, movies and filmed TV shows look like they were shot on video. I have debated this with family members, as I am convinced this is a function of their TV settings, not how the movies/shows are supposed to look. They say I am outdated; tghias is the way it is supposed to appear.

Am I imagining things, or have they misset their TV's -- or have I?
I agree the ability of current TVs to show high resolution allows people to see what resolution the incoming program is in. Some HD (especially news, sports) is stunning in clarity. While other stuff is just not.
Why is another question.
A lot depends on the cable company, or if you are straight over the air.
Or even if the person is using an HDMI cable, or common RCA from the cable box, or the anntenna input.
So a lot of variables in the way the signal is received.
I have only over the air HDTV.. and find I do not need to spend a hundred bucks a month for the endless cable co. trash.
I totally agree. A lot of BlueRay movies look like they are closed circuit TV or soap opera video to me. Way too much contract and too sharp. Interestingly, it doesn't look like this when you see it at the movies.

I have not bought into BlueRay yet because of this. I just don't enjoy watching a movie when it looks like actors on a soundstage instead of characters in a story.

It's a preference thing. Many people think it is really cool to see things with such realism. But for me it just takes away from the movie experience.
There's supposed to be feature in the menu that can turn this effect off. I got into a discussion with a Chess Master who thinks the effect looks normal(his set-up is horrible).

A new video game called "Rage" debuted a couple of months ago and was said the be the Sh.t. It had the "Soap Opera" effect causing the immediate removal my Xbox 360.

It reminds me of the early MTV efforts where it was really shot on tape.
Most tv shows and a lot of films are no longer recorded to film but are recorded to video tape or another form of digital storage. Film for tv has been gone for quite a few years
Sorry to say but its not the bluray format or Hdtv shows that does this to the look of the picture. It's a feature in the newer tv's ( turn it off!) and is very unnatural to the original source and is the very reason recently when my Pioneer Elite 64" gave out on me I went straight to a 73" Mitsubishi Dlp, The picture rivals film and is very pleasing. I own Lcd's and have friends with Plasma's (My seacond choice)Keep in mind before you get to fustrated most of the people who think this the way its supposed to look listen to Mp3's! Think about that for awhile.
Jdub is right. That is most certainly an effect, and is definitely not how it is supposed to look. When you properly calibrate one of the newer TV's, you should turn off this feature. You can find a forum or article with the proper calibration methods for your specific TV, or you can just pay someone from your nearest home theater store (or even Best Buy) to come and calibrate it for you.

So, don't worry Nglazer. You're definitely right, and your friends are wrong.
I have noticed it too, and refrained from buying a newer monitor as a result. I have not seen any sets which have this so-called feature (e.g., Samsung 8000 series) where the feature is turned off. What is the name of this feature that makes everything look like video, which can be turned off?
Edge enhancement is what it usually is called
I am certain plenty of proprietary names are used with slight variations. But basically it creates a 'hard' edge between colors.
Makes the picture 'POP' out of the screen more, and fools some into thinking the picture has greater resolution.
We don't need tone controls on audio gear, so why should our TVs have picture quality controls? It mucks with the signal. I say do away with them and bask in all natural video. BEtter yet, do away with high res digital TVs and go back to nice creamy looking analog
I think they are making some look like video on purpose. Like Battle: Los Angeles, they want that reality TV looks that is all the rage. I myself never like liked it and do not watch reality TV, I get enough real life in real life. When the fad is over they will go back to good TV and Movies, hopefully.
Elizabeth- I don't think this problem has much to do with Edge Enhancement. What produces the "soap opera/video/cartoonish" appearance in newer LCDs and LED/LCDs involves how these displays combine frame interpolation with their higher refresh rates in an attempt to reduce motion artifacts. The settings are sometimes hard to isolate, but usually are labelled with terms like "Smoothing" or "Motion Flow".

Mapman- Of course we need picture quality controls to adjust the display to the conditions in the room. Have you ever calibrated a display against a reference standard? Many of the picture settings end up quite far from their neutral positions. It is fine if you personally choose not to adjust any of your settings, but most likely your picture quality will suffer as a result.


I'm joking of course.

My background is in digital image processing.

Just trying to make sure the old fashioned audio purists out there that poo poo extra circuits in their audio gear aren't asleep.....
Guess I wasn't quite with it yet this morning, pretty funny!
I've noticed this with a friend's newer TV, which has some LED elements in it. I hate the effect, except with sports.

Along those lines, I also hate the digital projection I've seen in local movie theaters lately. They tout this as a feature, but can anyone actually think it looks good? Grainy,colors washed out, poor blacks, terrible resolution of dark scenes, panning problems. Dreadful. Can this feature have any benefits other than cost reduction?