more power from both sockets?


can one draw all the power from one socket
(of a standard US 2-socket outlet)
that one could draw using both sockets?

[I ask because I'm wondering, if I want to use just one outlet to power multiple components, could I draw more power if I bought another power conditioner for the other socket?]

thank you!
coyote2
More instantaneous power for music peaks YES. More total power no. (If the wire you now have is NOT getting warm to the touch, you have enough current available via the wire you now use. If the one cord you now use IS warm to the touch, a second wire, or a larger gauge cable is neccessary, or, like you ask, two cables for total power usage.
If your wire is cool to the touch it is sufficient for the total power you are using. If you want a chance to have more instantanious current available, a second wire dedicated from the wall to our amp is the way to go. (or to the power conditioner for your amp) OR a bigger gauge cord will basically do the same thing.
I am planning to add a second line from the wall to my stuff where now i have a 40+ foot 14 gauge A/C cord from a 20 amp wall socket (it is alone, no other outlets for that 20 amp)
So I made a really long cord that winds around everything to get to where my stuff is. i think a second just for my amp Pc would give me a bit more dynamics.. maybe. and since it will be a dual 12 guage or two 12 gauge it will be overkill? (but why not, hey?)
Remember, inside the wall the fixture is connected to a Romex directly to ONE of the two sockets, and only a thin (built in) bridge connects the second in nearly all fixtures anyway.. so if you go with one fat cable, check inside to see that you are plugged in to the one straight to the romex. As long as you are inthere, replace the outlet with a new good quality 15/20 amp Schurter, or other $3.50 or so good A/C receptical (not an audiophile one for ten to one hundred times the price)
To add to Elizabeth's post: If I were worried about the available current at the wall, I would (hire an electrician if you do not know how) check all of the series connections of that socket back to the box. You'd be amazed at how poor some of those connections may be. Re strip the wire and make sure it is using the screw connection, not the push in holes.
Just to gain more insight to this question, would it be advantageous to have a separate dedicated line to each component?
I like to have one dedicated line reserved for the amp, a second for the front end, and a third for digital.
Just to gain more insight to this question, would it be advantageous to have a separate dedicated line to each component?

If your components use three pin AC plugs, that's perhaps the worst thing you could do. It only makes ground loop issues worse.
There should be no ground loop problems if multiple dedicated lines are all on the same 120V leg.

There should be no ground loop problems if multiple dedicated lines are all on the same 120V leg.

The classic ground loop is created by the AC safety ground. Or more specifically, interchassis leakage currents that are flowing through the AC safety ground.

The magnitude of the noise created by these leakage currents is a function of the impedance between the AC safety grounds of two or more components. The higher the impedance, the greater the magnitude of the noise.

The ideal condition is to have all of the components' AC safety grounds connected via the lowest possible impedance, such as plugging them all into the same outlet or outlet strip on a single AC line.

If you connect multiple components to multiple dedicated lines, the impedance between the components' AC safety grounds is dramatically increased because now they're connected via the long runs of AC wiring back to the service panel.
All of that book theory is fine, but it does not reflect real world audiophile experience. Thousands of audio enthusiasts run their systems on multiple dedicated lines -- on the same 120V leg -- with no ground loop issues. What is the person with the large audio or HT system of multiple high powered amps supposed to do ? Run everything on a single 20A circuit for fear of having a ground loop ?

All of that book theory is fine, but it does not reflect real world audiophile experience. Thousands of audio enthusiasts run their systems on multiple dedicated lines -- on the same 120V leg -- with no ground loop issues. What is the person with the large audio or HT system of multiple high powered amps supposed to do ? Run everything on a single 20A circuit for fear of having a ground loop ?

I didn't say multiple dedicated lines would necessarily create a ground loop (many manufacturers isolate the signal reference ground from the chassis which is tied to the AC safety ground).

Only that they would acerbate any ground loop issues that do exist.

Your post implied that as long as they're all tied to the same 120 volt line, this would prevent ground loop issues, which simply isn't the case.