More curious than a real question- remote trigger? Anyone use it?


So my amp can be switched on one of two way. Pushing the power button on the front or by connecting a short cable to the preamp and then using the preamp's remote to trigger the amp on.

I am sure other amps can be remotely turned on as well. Just wondering if anyone actually uses the remote trigger feature. I don't, but I tried it for a day or two for sh*ts and giggles. 

I have a straight forward 2 channel system. Perhaps if I were running a bank of amps, I could see the usefulness. 
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The remote trigger was used mainly in home theater installations where amps might be hidden or even in another room.  Most  'philes I know with strictly 2 channel systems don't use that feature...
Makes sense
my friend just hooked up his Pass X250.8 and XP-20 that way, and is quite happy with it...
"my friend just hooked up his Pass X250.8 and XP-20 that way, and is quite happy with it..."

Nice!
It's particularly useful for high power, multi-channel.

Nice to be able to turn off the surround/center amps when only listening to 2 channel.

Some power conditioners will also do this for you in case your amps do not.

Best,

E
I have used it for years with no sonic issues. It is a 12v circuit and has not given me or others I know any diminished performance. Logic tells me, it triggers the unit on and off, again via a separate power supply and is a micro second of employment, and at those two moments, your not listening. It triggers a relay to toggle the power switch and is present in the circuit whether in use or not. My opinion, and may not be a full scientific analogy of the logic, but I like the convenience. Besides if it did cause diminishing performance, would companies targeting the best performance include it?
I have used it a lot, especially with complex setups. There really is no way it could effect sound. The only real possibility is if it triggered an independent path for line power, separate from the on/off switched path AND that path was in some bizarre way current limiting for the line in. I have never seen this, nor seen a schematic for such a separate, duplicate line in feed.
I hadn't suggested it affects sound, but I was simply curious about usage. Thanks all! 
Wow this is very important i have one on the amp don't use it as i don't  have Audia Flight preamp but it is way cool.
northernescape
...  There really is no way it could effect sound. The only real possibility is if it triggered an independent path for line power, separate from the on/off switched path AND that path was in some bizarre way current limiting for the line in
It isn't clear what you're trying to say here. A key advantage of using a power trigger is that an amplifier can be plugged into a separate, dedicated outlet solely for it, while the component that sends the trigger signal to the amplifier is powered from a separate line.

In a way, every power line is "current limited." That's why they use circuit breakers, right?

I use the remote trigger on both my McIntosh and Audia Flight systems.  I like the convenience of turning everything on with a single push of a button.  After all, if I'm turning on the preamp, the amp is going to be turned on anyway. 
So as to the question about sound quality, no, the trigger switches do not affect sound quality.

However, I like to leave my main amps on 24/7. A lot easier on the planet with Class D. :)

Best,

E
I use a trigger…finger…it's part of my hand, and it does have an effect on the sound as it can be used for level adjustment, utilized with other fingers (also part of my hand, of which I have 2) it can move things around, and will allow most components to be turned on and off. Other uses are, frankly, none of your business.