Max. dB level at break in w/ VR4jr


What is the maximum (not average) peak dB level that you play your Von Scheikert VR4jr's at during extended break in? About what would the overall average dB be during extended break in? How far away from the speakers is your measurement?
Also how accurate is the Radio Shack Sound Level Meter?
Thank you
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Placing a Dixie cup on the woofer and pressing several times does loosen the woofer surrounds a little. THis was advice I got from a well respected speaker designer who has built speakers since before I was born. And it does work (a little). Like everything else it is unecessary to do anything more than normal listening to break equipment in.
I think I mentioned during one of our conversations that I played my GenIII's loud enough during the first 100 hrs. that I couldn't stand to be in the same room with them & not because they were so loud, rather they just sounded so bad. I would guess in the mid 90 dB range & now 3 yrs. later they can play 105 comfortably at the listening position w/o any problem whatsoever. I would think the same set of rules apply to the jr's too. You can always call out there & talk to them about it.

Once I got past those first 100 hrs, I just did what I do now-sometimes I play it loud, other times at the lowest audible level.

My listening position is 10' from ea. spkr
"try using a Dixie cup centered over the dust cap"

yeah, don't do that.

They sound good now? Just listen and enjoy. Filling in the weight chamber with lead/sand and getting them positioned correctly will do more than break in.
"To break in woofers a little faster try using a Dixie cup centered over the dust cap to press GENTLY on the woofers about ten times. Be very careful not to make any off-axis movements."

What is this supposed to due, loosen up the surrounds? Sounds scary.
To break in any speaker I would recomend playing a disc at a slightly lower volume level than normal listening level while NOT at home (while at work or whatever). This way power surges or disc skips are less likely to damage the speaker and the neighbors are not going to complain.

While at home just play them at normal listening levels.

Both Radio Shack SPL meters are good because they have been the accepted poor-man standard forever. If they are off it would be relative to the rest of the Radio Shack SPL meters that have been used since the dawn of time.

In my opinion break-in of all equipment is relative to listening levels. There is no need to run-in the equipment at volume levels that you are not going to listen to.

To break in woofers a little faster try using a Dixie cup centered over the dust cap to press GENTLY on the woofers about ten times. Be very careful not to make any off-axis movements.

Listening to new speakers slowly break in is part of the fun. They evolve into a great sounding speaker gradualy and are more enjoyable after having witnessed teh change.

Enjoy.