Live show audience noise


Listening to Getz Au Go Go. I understand that when they made the recording, the audience were asked to refrain from whistling in appreciation. Unfortunately, they didn't. I find it irritating that so many recordings are spoiled by excessive whistling. Opinions?

Previewnoromance
shame on them......geesh.
Immature, attention seeking, twits. Sorry, they're everywhere. 
Or they're just very psyched..
Well recorded audience noise is one of the best things about live recordings, being able to place each sniffle and clink of a glass is a great test of verisimilitude. For example, a visitor brought round a live Horowitz CD yesterday and I really enjoyed teasing out the differences between creaking chairs and the noise of the piano action. For me it's these idiosyncrasies and "faults" in a recording that make this hobby real and why I often prefer live versions to the studio originals
Audiences have become increasingly rude and noisy, ruining not only live recordings but concerts as well. Unfortunately, asking the audience not to make too much noise only alerts the idiots who want to hear themselves on the record.

I don’t think anything can be done about it because these people have paid their $25 and damn it! they’re going to whistle and yell whenever they want! I don’t see the trend reversing any time soon.
Agree with folkfreak. I listen to 90% classical and appreciate well recorded live performances. Regarding Jazz performances, that’s the nature of the beast. Jazz enthusiasts can’t help themselves when they’re absorbed in the music; I’ve been to jazz clubs and that’s just the way it is, even when it’s announced that the show is being recorded.

At a classical performance, there is proper etiquette that some jerks don't follow. And it bugs the hell out of me.
$25 for a live concert?  Lucky you.
Depends.

An intrinsic element to Gieseking’s 1944 Emperor is the anti-aircraft cannon in the background. This makes perfect sense of the phrase of rambling chaos up and down the keyboard, of what happens when the emperor gets lost - people die. As such, it is part of what makes this the greatest Emperor ever recorded. If not audience noise, it's what neither performer nor composer intended.

Folk music is often improved by the audience, although the most intrusive lout ever recorded can be heard on the Kingston Trio’s Hungry Eye (1958).

Like I say, depends.
Yeah. It's not audience noise that bugs me, it's he ear-splitting whistling. I love the live murmur in a jazz speakeasy!
A live Dead recording is ruined by it and a lovely moment between Roy Harper and Jimmy Page destroyed forever by some idiot. Etc. I was at a Melani Safka gig once and a woman beside me whistled all the time. It was ridiculous.