Jazz for aficionados


Jazz for aficionados

I'm going to review records in my collection, and you'll be able to decide if they're worthy of your collection. These records are what I consider "must haves" for any jazz aficionado, and would be found in their collections. I wont review any record that's not on CD, nor will I review any record if the CD is markedly inferior. Fortunately, I only found 1 case where the CD was markedly inferior to the record.

Our first album is "Moanin" by Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers. We have Lee Morgan , trumpet; Benney Golson, tenor sax; Bobby Timmons, piano; Jymie merrit, bass; Art Blakey, drums.

The title tune "Moanin" is by Bobby Timmons, it conveys the emotion of the title like no other tune I've ever heard, even better than any words could ever convey. This music pictures a person whose down to his last nickel, and all he can do is "moan".

"Along Came Betty" is a tune by Benny Golson, it reminds me of a Betty I once knew. She was gorgeous with a jazzy personality, and she moved smooth and easy, just like this tune. Somebody find me a time machine! Maybe you knew a Betty.

While the rest of the music is just fine, those are my favorite tunes. Why don't you share your, "must have" jazz albums with us.

Enjoy the music.
orpheus10

Has anyone ever wondered why absolutely nothing that came from Africa survived US slavery?

All throughout the Caribbean and South America, stuff survived that came over with the slaves from Africa.   But not even one drum lick that came from Africa survived US slavery; voodoo over here came from Haiti. Blackey had to go to Africa to discover the African drum.
Has anyone ever wondered why absolutely nothing that came from Africa survived US slavery?
I disagree with this statement.

All throughout the Caribbean and South America, stuff survived that came over with the slaves from Africa.  But not even one drum lick that came from Africa survived US slavery; voodoo over here came from Haiti. Blackey had to go to Africa to discover the African drum.
I'm confused. Haven't you been saying that during the slave trade the Africans brought all of their tribal musical traditions all over the world and subsequently it disappeared from Africa (which I also disagree with). If you believe that how could Art Blakey go to Africa well after slavery ended and find the African drum.

Have I missed something?

Pjw, you understand what you want to understand, and don't understand what you don't want to understand.

You don't even understand that the US and Brazil are two different places.


I understand what was, is, and will always be.
010

With all respect I am not trying to have a war of words with you but your very defensive answers, in which you are belittling me while not answering with primary sources your opinion/firm belief? absolutely nothing that came from Africa survived US slavery?  

And your opinion/firm belief? that traditional African tribal music has vanished entirely from Africa after the centuries of the slave trade. Is there any way you can support this with facts from primary, secondary or tertiary sources?

And if this is true how could Blakey learn African drums if it has disappeared, as you contend from prior posts, from the African continent after the centuries of the slave trade.

I understand what was, is, and will always be.
Well then I guess my time is wasted since you understand all. Please leave the personal insults out of your replies.
So, let me get this straight, O-10. According to your own words, you claim to “being able to distinguish various African rhythms“ due to your DNA; even though you are from a different continent and live centuries later.  Yet, the DNA of African slaves, the very folks who lived those rhythms in Africa, and their descendants had that DNA completely erased when brought to the America’s.  Got it!