Is this a good leveling tool?


Hi,

I recently came accross this item, while reading on a forum.

http://srm-tech.co.uk/epages/4c008923-2265-416e-a207-cc9dd8b06028.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/4c008923-2265-416e-a207-cc9dd8b06028/Products/TSL1

I used my clearaudio level gauge to level my TT but I can't place the level gauge in the very center of the platter. This one can be placed on the very center. Is it helpful or is the presentation of it o the SRM-tech website just rubbish? Has anyone here used this item before?

Otherwise they have a clamp with a bubble level as well. Any feedback would be welcome.

http://srm-tech.co.uk/epages/4c008923-2265-416e-a207-cc9dd8b06028.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/4c008923-2265-416e-a207-cc9dd8b06028/Products/RSC

Best,

B.
boozendormi
i have used a circular bubble level and a line level to level TT

both work bubble level trickier
Thanks for your anwser. But what about placing the bubble level in the exact center of the platter? Is it really more accurate?
Assuming the platter is to specs, it shouldn't matter what level you use. The only difference would be that if you use a straight bubble level, you just need take 2 non parallel measurements. (90 degrees rotation is easiest.) It doesn't matter if the level doesn't pass through the center of the platter.
I don't believe their statements regarding only a level that fits over the spindle
hole is appropriate. That would imply that different parts of the platter are in
different planes. Better get rid of that platter then! If that were true, no level
would work. A 2x4, pipe etc. will be level if one end is level as long as it is not
bent. Buy a good quality machinist's level and learn to trust it. Much more
expensive than what you are looking at but if you want accuracy.
I
recommend and use the 8 inch model
But what about placing the bubble level in the exact center of the platter? Is it really more accurate?
No, if the platter is level, then any place on the platter will be the same, level. If there is a difference between two points on the platter, then as Wntrmute2 said, "Better get rid of that platter then!"
Well, in some cases, the above is bad advice. Pink Triangle, and others made intentionally dished platters on some models to flatten pinch warped LPs when used with a supplied clamp.

In these instances a laser level adjusted to the inner and outer edges, or the spindle level, would seem to be the best ways to accomplish this.
Right. That makes totally sense to me when you explain things that way. Thank you gentlemen for your accurate and detailed answers.
I use a digital straight level in the manner ZD explained. The digital readout is a bit more accurate than a bubble.
Thanks for this last tip Viridian. Well, my platter is flat and has been designed to be leveled at any point but I'll keep your advice in mind, just in case :)
If you have a suspended table think twice about using an 8" level. It'll imbalance the suspension and give a mis-read.

Try these instead, in mirrored positions on the platter.
They are so light they won't affect the platter.

http://www.russandrews.com/product-Bubble-Level-Twin-Pack-5021.htm

You can verify the product accuracy by reversing them through 180 degrees at the same location. Just ensure the platter surface is scrupulously clean.
Coincidently, I was looking at the subject of which level yesterday, on the Linn Forum site. The (jist of the)answer was to use a long level(maybe 8-inches or more)on the plinth, because wood has enough minor imperfections that make smaller levels inaccurate. Of course, there are a lot of other things involved in the setup of this turntable, so maybe those make the longer level more accurate for this turntable.
There's no need to level the plinth on the OP's TT. And on a Clearaudio, it's probably not made of wood anyway. You first level the shelf, then put the TT on it and level it at the platter. That's all you need to do.

"08-16-15: Viridian
Well, in some cases, the above is bad advice. Pink Triangle, and others made intentionally dished platters on some models to flatten pinch warped LPs when used with a supplied clamp.

In these instances a laser level adjusted to the inner and outer edges, or the spindle level, would seem to be the best ways to accomplish this."

Those platters are not very common. But if you ever have to level one, the spindle level would be a last choice. You have no way checking anything beyond the spindle itself. So if there is any type of imperfection further out, you would have know way of knowing.

I guess you could use a laser level, but the dish design platter has been out long before laser levels were available. The way you level those is almost exactly the same way you do a regular platter. You use a longer level and make sure it passes over the outside edges (the highest point), in 2 places. And you'll need to take measurements from 2 non parallel lines, just like in the first example.
Don't use a laser level because dished platters were invented before laser levels were available. I'm not sure of the logic in this.

Does it then follow that we should not use USB microscopes to set SRA as the phono cartridge was invented before the USB microscope?
LOL it's just a piece of plexi-glass attached to $3 pocket bubble level.
I believe that it carries the purpose of convenience and nothing more.
If you adjust the position of your plinth placing bubble level closer to the edges, you can get more precise alignment than if it placed at the very center.
This is all you need. $7.00 on Ebay !
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Turntable-Platter-and-Tonearm-Headshell-Bubble-Level-Combo-Kit-/251943100095?hash=item3aa8fa9ebf
"09-10-15: Viridian
Don't use a laser level because dished platters were invented before laser levels were available. I'm not sure of the logic in this."

I agree. If you pick a statement apart the meaning can change. When that happens logic is optional. Lets have another look and see if we can make some sense of all this.

""08-16-15: Viridian
Well, in some cases, the above is bad advice. Pink Triangle, and others made intentionally dished platters on some models to flatten pinch warped LPs when used with a supplied clamp.

In these instances a laser level adjusted to the inner and outer edges, or the spindle level, would seem to be the best ways to accomplish this."

It doesn't seem that way to me. If you use a spindle level, you have no way of knowing if anything beyond the spindle is true. And as Czarivey states, the center is the least accurate place to take a measurement.

Although you could use a laser level, there's really no reason to. You don't need to take high and low point measurements.

To answer your question of not seeing the logic in using a laser level because the dish platter was around long before it was invented, my intension was not to say you couldn't use a laser level. But what did they use. And in this case, you would use a long bubble level that passes over 2 outer (High) points of the platter. You'll need to take 2 non parallel readings like with any other platter. If the platter happens to be warped or bent in some way, it won't level.

Here's exactly what I sais in my 1st post. I think its pretty clear.

"Those platters are not very common. But if you ever have to level one, the spindle level would be a last choice. You have no way checking anything beyond the spindle itself. So if there is any type of imperfection further out, you would have know way of knowing.

I guess you could use a laser level, but the dish design platter has been out long before laser levels were available. The way you level those is almost exactly the same way you do a regular platter. You use a longer level and make sure it passes over the outside edges (the highest point), in 2 places. And you'll need to take measurements from 2 non parallel lines, just like in the first example. "
Again, I respectfully disagree. A longer level will certainly work on some turntables, but not those with spring suspended subchassis, unless the level weighs approximately the same as an LP and the weight is centered as an LP would be.

I have never used a spindle level but if, as you say, it tells you that the spindle is true, and the platter is not, this would probably indicate a problem in the manufacturing process, as the spindle should always be true to the platter. If it is not, the ensuing issues will be much greater than leveling can remedy.
09-10-15: Czarivey
LOL it's just a piece of plexi-glass attached to $3 pocket bubble level.
I believe that it carries the purpose of convenience and nothing more.
If you adjust the position of your plinth placing bubble level closer to the edges, you can get more precise alignment than if it placed at the very center.


LOL indeed I have no idea what you are referring to, as I use a tripod mounted laser level and there is really nothing particularly convenient about it. Sometimes assumptions are just that; as are dismissive comments. I was speaking of leveling the platter, not the plinth so no, I would not measure the level of the platter by placing a bubble level closest to the edge of the plinth, unless you are speaking of closest to the circumference of the platter.
What do you make of this?

"That’s good advice. How do you prepare?

A firm, level work surface is necessary. Basic hand tools are required along with any special tools needed for tonearm or suspension adjustments. Special tools are usually furnished with the turntable or tonearm. A precision alignment gauge must be used to align the cartridge and set stylus overhang. A carpenter’s level is essential. A straight edge level works much better than a round bubble level.

When the work area is ready and the tools are collected how do you begin the set-up?

I start assembling a mass-isolated table by leveling the platter. The feet should be adjusted to be as close to the plinth as possible and locking nuts tightened to eliminate vibration and movement. Next verify that the plinth is level. If the platter is level and the plinth or arm mounting surface is not level, you’ve got a serious problem. Fix it before you proceed. All level checks should be done in two perpendicular directions—side-to-side and front-to-back. That covers the first stage of set-up for tables without spring suspension.

Are suspended turntables assembled differently?

Many suspended tables, like Linn Sondeks, must be elevated for access to the chassis adjustments. These tables should be mounted in a secure set-up jig that allows you to work above and below the plinth. The set-up jig must be level.

Again the first step is to level the platter and verify that the arm mounting surface is parallel to the platter surface. If the arm mounting surface is not absolutely parallel to the platter surface the situation must be corrected. The tonearm will not work correctly if there is even a small deviation from parallel. Fix the problem or replace the defective part. Do not use shims in an attempt to compensate for non-parallel surfaces!

After we’re sure that everything is level and true, what’s next?

At this point I install the cartridge in the tonearm with the bolts positioned at the midpoint of the headshell slots, mount the tonearm on the turntable and pre-adjust the counterweight. Before suspension adjustments begin, the tonearm cable and belt should be installed and the tonearm should be placed in the midpoint of travel over the playable surface of the record. Then the suspension can be leveled."

Here's a link to the entire article.

http://brooksberdanltd.com/turntable-setup-by-richard-hardesty