Is it necessary to use the same cable brand and model for bi-wiring??


I have a pair of Wharfdale Denton 80th Anniversary  speakers that can be bi-wired. I have read many pro and cons about bi-wiring improving the sound quality.  I still like to give it a shot, but do not want to use an expensive pair of speaker cables to satisfy my curiosity  All comments and recommendations welcomed    
sunnyjim
What are you currently using for cables? You might want to look into or making your own set of jumpers instead of the jumper strips that came with your speakers. Also experiment the configuration on how to hook up cables with jumpers. There's plenty of info out there and Nordost Cables among others have their recommendations on it as well.
Check these out: Available in other lengths too. Work great for me.

http://www.amazon.com/BI-WIRE-Audiophile-Speaker-Terminated-Connectors/dp/B00UT2FZ0Y?ie=UTF8&psc...


No, it is not "necessary" to use the same brand and model of cable for bi-wiring, just as it is not necessary to use the same brand and model of amplifiers when bi-amping.
Then you are using the cables as a tone control. 
stevizzy31 posts05-13-2016 7:51pmThen you are using the cables as a tone control.

What cable is NOT colored?
Exactly my point. 
stevizzy32 posts05-13-2016 8:49pmExactly my point.
OK, if I don’t want to use cable for tone control, what do you suggest? How do I connect my amp to the speakers?   Bluetooth?

You should select cables that compliment your speakers then biwire with identical cables. 
You should select cables that compliment your speakers then biwire with identical cables
.
By selecting cables, isn't that tone control?   You prefer tone the selected cable over others?  Every cable has a sonic characteristic?

Yes, all cables have a "character". 
What might be a wonderful and expensive cable might not be the best choice for certain speakers or amplifier. 
Find a good dealer who is familiar with your speakers and electronics and ask for their advice. 
Also, Music Direct sells a variety of cables at various price points and you can try them for a few weeks and have the option to return them if you aren't happy with the sound. 
Thats what dealers are for. 
Yes, all cables have a "character".

Right, you're tone controlling by selecting a cable.   So what's the difference in using same or different cables for bi-wiring, still tone control?

BTW, I would use the same cable for bi-wiring.
What might be a wonderful and expensive cable might not be the best choice for certain speakers or amplifier.
Find a good dealer who is familiar with your speakers and electronics and ask for their advice.
Also, Music Direct sells a variety of cables at various price points and you can try them for a few weeks and have the option to return them if you aren't happy with the sound.
Thats what dealers are for.
How's this relevant to the discussion on tone control?   
All of audio is about tone control. What difference does it make if I change speaker around to suit my cables, or change cables around to suit my speakers?
People basically change gear/cables around to suit their personal tastes. It's nothing to make a fuss about.

Put 10 audiophiles in a room to discuss biwire, and they will emerge with at least 11 different theories.

The majority of speakers today have biwire connections, however only a minority have been specifically designed for this from the ground up. For the rest it's just an add-on to maintain audio fashion. The manufacturers of the speakers that are specifically designed for biwire only recommend using two separate runs of identical cable for the biwire. So it appears they think it is necessary.

I agree that changing cables can make a difference in tonal character of the sound, however IMHO it doesn't make common sense to try and change high and low inputs on a speaker separately. That could cause an imbalance of frequencies at the crossover point.




Thanks to all who have contributed to this thread.  Let me assure those who responded, I am not using cables as tone controls. I just want to see if there is a qualitative improvement in sound, and to find this out with moderate expense.   The single cables I currently use are the Grover Huffman "EZ"  ( not sure what that logo stands for. o bought the cables from a sound engineer who works for Warner Brothers. He raved about their sound, ands was pretty much on the mark. I also have a pair of Harmonic Technology Pro 11+ which were highly touted and rightfully so. The only probably they are thick fire hose girth and a 12 ft pair.  That is why I was asking about speaker cables for bi-wiring the Wharfdale  Denton monitors. which are excellent.  
Well it sounds like you have two dissimilar pairs of speaker cables already. So you can try the experiment on your own. I've done it, don't worry, you won't blow anything up.
See for yourself if it works or not, let your own ears decide.
Let us know what you think.

Oh, and I have used cables as tone controls. I think everybody does, some just don't like to admit it. If you choose a cable that sounds best to you, in your system, then you are choosing the cable that matches the tonal qualities that you like best. Hence, using cables as a tone control.
I wouldn't get too hung up on spending a ton of money on speaker cables for your Wharfedale's which I'm sure is a nice set of speakers. A very good and neutral biwire jumper by Clear Day Cables will work just fine. All cables are some sort of a tone control, even ultra expensive cables. I'm using WyWires Silvers with Clear Day Jumpers and they work just fine; I have a set of WyWires jumpers coming so using my Clear Days for now. I've not heard your Wharfedale's but I suspect my Aerial's dig a bit deeper and I don't feel not running two separate runs of speaker cables is going to change things much; they sound pretty darn good as is. The point is people with much larger speakers that have more top and bottom end get along just fine with a single run with jumpers. I'd recommend buying the best single run you can afford and use quality jumpers over two pairs for the same amount of money. 
Hi Jim,
I agree with adg101. I believe the benefits of bi-wiring likely become greater when running speakers with large, power-hungry low frequency drivers. For your Wharfdales, I would simply run those HT Pro 11+ cables, or your GHs, full range to the MF/LF terminals, use some high quality jumpers to the HF and enjoy the music.
I would consider using jumpers made with something like this:
http://www.partsconnexion.com/wire_hookup_neotech_cu_tef_sc.html
Since these are solid core wires, you can easily use a single wire without connectors as jumpers.
If you jump from the MF/LF posts to the HF posts, I would probably select the 16-18awg wire. If you jump from the HF posts to the MF/LF posts, then I would use the largest 12awg wire. Four 6-10 inch pieces should work just fine. They also offer the same OCC wire as stranded, which may be kinder to your HFs. You may need spades or banannas if you use the stranded wire.
http://www.partsconnexion.com/wire_hookup_neotech_cu_tef_st.html
Somewhat on topic. I just went to a bi-amp setup with my VR 33's and read in a review that the internal cabling of the speaker was Analysis Plus 14 gauge. Since I need new wire to replace my current bi wire cable (Morrow sp-5), I was wondering about cable matching to the internal wiring. Looking at the costs for some of the Analysis Plus cabling being sold here on Audiogon would there any benefit of much more expensive cabling outside connecting the speaker than there is internally? I could save hundreds but wouldn't realize what the actual difference would be without hearing both. Don't have much experience with system setups. Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks.
As some have mentioned previously, talk to a dealer for ideas of cables that might sound good with your particular electronics and speakers.  I have owned various models of Vandersteen loudspeakers for the last 30 years.  His crossover networks are intended by design to be used with biwiring.  In conversations with the folks at Vandersteen they are quite emphatic that you not mix brands or cable topologies.  What I did to maximize quality and control the price of speaker cables to some extent was to buy two sets of Audioquest cables from the same "family".  The mid-high cable had the highest quality conductors and the bass cable was one step below in that family with slightly less pure conductors.  I am confident you could employ such a strategy with cables from numerous manufacturers.
Its best to use the same cable...as a matter of fact, its even better to bi-wire with seperate (but same) cable for each leg  (4 cables/side)  Cables that have single connection on one end and double (4) connections on the other are not as good.
Right on stringreen!